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Old 12-25-2011, 01:46 PM
 
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Would you say it's the central Midwest, California, the Pacific Northwest, the Southwest, or the Rockies? I mean it has to be one of those.

Or I guess it could be the accent used by northern implants into southern cities as well.
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Old 12-25-2011, 02:21 PM
 
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Depends on where the program is based/set.
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Old 12-25-2011, 02:22 PM
 
Location: Jefferson City 4 days a week, St. Louis 3 days a week
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Quote:
Originally Posted by canucker View Post
Would you say it's the central Midwest, California, the Pacific Northwest, the Southwest, or the Rockies? I mean it has to be one of those.

Or I guess it could be the accent used by northern implants into southern cities as well.
All of those.
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Old 12-25-2011, 02:28 PM
 
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Originally Posted by stlouisan View Post
All of those.
Exactly, though I hear St. Louis is often used as the gold standard accent for national news broadcasts.
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Old 12-25-2011, 02:48 PM
 
Location: Both coasts
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What kind of television?

National News? generally Californian or Midwestern (Great Plains states like Iowa/ Nebraska) sounding, even in markets where the majority of ppl may not even speak like that (ie the South or urban NE)

TV dramas? actors will usually sound very Californian or Midwestern (Great Plains states) unless they want to portray interesting stereotypes by using Southern or distinct NE accents

The SW has a slightly stronger sounding accent imo...the Pacific NW is kind of like a blend of California-and the Midwestern Great Plains accents (people in Seattle say "bag" more like in the Midwest than CA)...also within the Midwest definitely imo states like MO and OH and IN sound more "drawl-ly" so I dont think they're representative of the speech you hear on tv..

Last edited by f1000; 12-25-2011 at 02:58 PM..
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Old 12-25-2011, 02:51 PM
 
Location: Jefferson City 4 days a week, St. Louis 3 days a week
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Quote:
Originally Posted by homiej View Post
Exactly, though I hear St. Louis is often used as the gold standard accent for national news broadcasts.
That's not true entirely. While it is true the generations after the Baby Boomers speak General American, that is not the case for prior generations. The native St. Louis accent has pronunciations that make it unique. The most distinct one is how "or" is pronounced. "Or" is pronounced "Ar." So for example, "forty"="farty". Also, "sundae" is pronounced "sundah". St. Louis is in the lower, not central Midwest...go about 100 miles to the south, or 'cross the Ohio River, and you're in the South. When I say the central Midwest, I'm thinking of Eastern Nebraska, Northwest Illinois, Iowa, and far Northern Missouri. The Lower Midwest is comprised of Kansas, most of Missouri, 2/3 of Illinois, Indiana, and Ohio." Once you go east and hit the Great Lakes, the accent is "inland North." The Midwest is divisible into North Midland, South Midland, Inland North, and Upper Midwest. The North Midland is the accent in the Midwest most closely associated with General American...and St. Louis has been mimicking that accent for a long time now.
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Old 12-25-2011, 05:58 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by stlouisan View Post
That's not true entirely. While it is true the generations after the Baby Boomers speak General American, that is not the case for prior generations. The native St. Louis accent has pronunciations that make it unique. The most distinct one is how "or" is pronounced. "Or" is pronounced "Ar." So for example, "forty"="farty". Also, "sundae" is pronounced "sundah". St. Louis is in the lower, not central Midwest...go about 100 miles to the south, or 'cross the Ohio River, and you're in the South. When I say the central Midwest, I'm thinking of Eastern Nebraska, Northwest Illinois, Iowa, and far Northern Missouri. The Lower Midwest is comprised of Kansas, most of Missouri, 2/3 of Illinois, Indiana, and Ohio." Once you go east and hit the Great Lakes, the accent is "inland North." The Midwest is divisible into North Midland, South Midland, Inland North, and Upper Midwest. The North Midland is the accent in the Midwest most closely associated with General American...and St. Louis has been mimicking that accent for a long time now.
The younger generation has the Northern Cities Vowel Shift, which is not General American. You don't hear newspeople say "maaam" for "mom" like in St. Louis. Yes, St. Louis comes close to having a General American accent, but the influence from the NCVS kinda ruined that.

I think the accent the OP is talking about is found in this area:

General American - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
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Old 12-25-2011, 07:37 PM
 
Location: East Coast of the United States
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It's just standard American accent - the kind of accent you will most typically hear in states like New York, California, Pennsylvania or Maryland.
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Old 12-25-2011, 07:46 PM
 
Location: Jefferson City 4 days a week, St. Louis 3 days a week
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Smtchll View Post
The younger generation has the Northern Cities Vowel Shift, which is not General American. You don't hear newspeople say "maaam" for "mom" like in St. Louis. Yes, St. Louis comes close to having a General American accent, but the influence from the NCVS kinda ruined that.

I think the accent the OP is talking about is found in this area:

General American - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Yeah, that's the region I was talking about. This map defines it pretty well. General American is also known as "North Midland." To the north of that lies two regions which exhibit some Canadian traits in their speech patterns: the Upper Midwest and inland north (along the Great Lakes), and to the south is South Midland, which features some southern traits. Below South Midland is Southern dialect, which can be subdivided into many different dialects IMO (Mountain South, Deep South, Piedmont, Tidewater, etc.)
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Old 12-25-2011, 08:17 PM
 
Location: Midwest
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Central Iowa
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