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Old 09-17-2012, 11:36 PM
 
Location: Mid Atlantic USA
12,330 posts, read 10,295,525 times
Reputation: 5389

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Quote:
Originally Posted by brentwoodgirl View Post
Wow, people are getting really upset in this thread. Loved the Oregon Trail reference, too funny!

I love the Pacific Northwest. The first time I visited Seattle I was in college, and I told my parents if it was about 2 hours closer by plane, I wouldn't have left. It's just gorgeous! I once stayed with a friend who lived in the Green Lake area, and that was amazing.
But I agree that it does feel more isolated. Not so much when you are there but when you are planning to go anywhere else. Or if you live in the smaller towns.

I have a friend who moved from Seattle to Nashville, and she was amazed how close everything was. She always joked that Nashville was an hour from everwhere. She did weekend trips to Atlanta, Memphis, KY Derby, quick flights to Chicago, NYC, etc. She was here 3 years and constantly commented on close everything was. Nashville is within a day's drive to 75% of the US population.

You really feel the isolation when you get out of Seattle to the east. The vast amounts of land are gorgeous, but isolated. Idaho Falls is more country than most parts of TN. Montana is unbelievably gorgeous, but the cities are tiny. Helena has a population of less than 30,000. I was amazed that it was just a small town.
Vancouver is wonderful, but it is 12+ hours to Calgary, which has a population of about a million. And from there, another 40 hours before you hit another city with a population of over a million (Toronto). So Vancouver is also very isolated.

I've flown into Seattle, driven up to Victoria Island, then to Vancouver, on to Banff, then Calgary, back down through Montana and into Wymoning and Yellowstone, so this isn't a Mapquest assessment, this is from experience. I've also flown into SLC and driven up through Idaho. Driven throug Wyoming, Utah, Nevada, etc., so I have so real experience, not just a map.

Southern California doesn't seem as isolated to me because you can drive for literally hours without seeing a break in between cities.

Drive through rural Washington, Montana, Idaho, etc and look at all the RVs/campers. An Idaho friend said they are so common because it takes so long to get anywhere in the West. They are not nearly as common east of the Mississippi, even in the rural areas.

It's not a slight on the PNW to say it's more isolated. It's a gorgeous area. But it is further from the major US population centers than most other areas, and with the time change, it's a harder flight as well.

Somehow I think this is exactly the reaction the Canadian wanted that started this thread. Been to Portland, a beautiful American city. It didn't feel one bit less American to me than Philly, just different.
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Old 08-11-2013, 02:59 AM
 
Location: Past: midwest, east coast
603 posts, read 707,724 times
Reputation: 621
Quote:
Originally Posted by Andy View Post
Nonsense, except the religion part. Look at Husky and Duck fans for a clue on sports, or both cities NBA sellout streaks, or Seattle leading both MLB and NBA in total attendance for multiple years and the Seahawks selling out most of the games in their history.
This is false. I've lived in Seattle for 7 years and can 100% vouch that this is far from a sports town. Several Seattle Times and Seattlepi columnists agree with these sentiments.

Seattle is a fair-weather sports town. Sports is not engrained in the culture of this place. I am from Detroit/Chicago so I know what a sports town feels like. Husky fans are nowhere near as passionate as Michigan/Michigan State/Ohio State fans; not even on the same radar (I attend the U. of Washington and know this first hand).

Mariners have the lowest attendance percentage in the MLB for years. Sonics' attendance has historically been very flaky, meaning that nobody attends when the team was bad but people show up when the team played well. This is pretty common for the NBA, making Seattle pretty average when it comes to basketball. It's no LA, Chicago, or New York.

Seahawks fans are mostly bandwagoners. They go to games and sell out tickets when the 'Hawks are expected to have a good season. Otherwise Century Link Field isn't anything spectacular when it comes to attendance. It is loud in there due to the stadium design and that's it.

I'll give Seattle soccer because Sounders fans show up win or lose. But all in all this is far from a sports town.

There are a few reasons for Seattle's lack of sports enthusiasm:
1) Metro population was never large until the tech boom of the last '90s. The metro still isn't as large as places like Detroit, Atlanta, etc. This means that the fanbases for Seattle teams are smaller.
2) Lack of media attention. Due to Seattle's geographic isolation, there are not many media outlets out here.
3) The teams aren't very old. Aside from the Sonics, the franchises here haven't been around for more than 30-40 years. Other cities have had some of their teams for 80+ years.
4) Limited success. The teams here haven't been all that successful. Only 1 championship ever. Limited playoff appearances as well.
5) Since the tech boom, many new people arrived here from other parts of the country. Transients typically root for their old teams. I see tons of San Francisco and LA sports fans here.

Last edited by Bimmerfanboy; 08-11-2013 at 03:16 AM..
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Old 08-11-2013, 03:06 AM
 
Location: Past: midwest, east coast
603 posts, read 707,724 times
Reputation: 621
It's easy to lump Vancouver, BC into the same category of Seattle and Portland (due to location) but I don't think this is appropriate.

I've been to all three cities many times. Vancouver feels very different from the other two. Once you cross the Canadian border there's a completely different vibe. Vancouver feels more like Toronto than it feels like Seattle/Portland.
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Old 08-11-2013, 04:09 AM
 
Location: Seattle, Washington
1,875 posts, read 2,693,182 times
Reputation: 1157
Quote:
Originally Posted by Seatown1 View Post
This is false. I've lived in Seattle for 7 years and can 100% vouch that this is far from a sports town. Several Seattle Times and Seattlepi columnists agree with these sentiments.

Seattle is a fair-weather sports town. Sports is not engrained in the culture of this place. I am from Detroit/Chicago so I know what a sports town feels like. Husky fans are nowhere near as passionate as Michigan/Michigan State/Ohio State fans; not even on the same radar (I attend the U. of Washington and know this first hand).

Mariners have the lowest attendance percentage in the MLB for years. Sonics' attendance has historically been very flaky, meaning that nobody attends when the team was bad but people show up when the team played well. This is pretty common for the NBA, making Seattle pretty average when it comes to basketball. It's no LA, Chicago, or New York.

Seahawks fans are mostly bandwagoners. They go to games and sell out tickets when the 'Hawks are expected to have a good season. Otherwise Century Link Field isn't anything spectacular when it comes to attendance. It is loud in there due to the stadium design and that's it.

I'll give Seattle soccer because Sounders fans show up win or lose. But all in all this is far from a sports town.

There are a few reasons for Seattle's lack of sports enthusiasm:
1) Metro population was never large until the tech boom of the last '90s. The metro still isn't as large as places like Detroit, Atlanta, etc. This means that the fanbases for Seattle teams are smaller.
2) Lack of media attention. Due to Seattle's geographic isolation, there are not many media outlets out here.
3) The teams aren't very old. Aside from the Sonics, the franchises here haven't been around for more than 30-40 years. Other cities have had some of their teams for 80+ years.
4) Limited success. The teams here haven't been all that successful. Only 1 championship ever. Limited playoff appearances as well.
5) Since the tech boom, many new people arrived here from other parts of the country. Transients typically root for their old teams. I see tons of San Francisco and LA sports fans here.
It's funny how you exaggerate everything, Mariners don't rank last an attendance ever. and Sonics set the record for highest average attendance in a season. During the 90's there was a 3 year waiting list for Seahawks season tickets. Not to mention the University of Washington always has crazy fan sport!
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Old 08-11-2013, 04:19 AM
 
Location: Past: midwest, east coast
603 posts, read 707,724 times
Reputation: 621
My hometown team, the Detroit Pistons, sold out their arena 8-9 years straight in the '00s.
The Detroit Red Wings have the most passionate fan base in the NHL, rivaling Toronto and Montreal in fan support.
The University of Michigan has the highest seating capacity in NCAA football and fills the stadium regularly. I am a student at the University of Washington and can tell you first hand that the football passion here is second-rate compared to the Midwest. The newly-renovated Husky stadium will hold 70,000 seats. Michigan stadium holds nearly 115,000. This huge discrepancy exists because the university knows they cannot fill more than 70K.
Mariners attendance is ranked 28/30 by percentage this year. It's been this way for over a decade.
NFL has 8 home games per year so teams normally sell out. Even the Detroit Lions always sell out.

My standards are probably higher since I grew up around sports-crazed people. Seattle's not all that bad of a sports town, but just not that good in my opinion. Atlanta definitely lacks fan support. Southern Florida is probably the worst when it comes to attendance/passion.

Looking back at my original post, I can see how I sounded a bit arrogant and exaggerative.
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Old 08-11-2013, 06:29 AM
 
9,967 posts, read 14,605,870 times
Reputation: 9193
Quote:
Originally Posted by Seatown1 View Post
My hometown team, the Detroit Pistons, sold out their arena 8-9 years straight in the '00s.
Yeah, but last three seasons they've been near the bottom of the NBA in terms of attendance. Last two seasons they've only filled 65% of the arena on average. Sounds like another warmweather fanbase that left when they team stopped winning--no different than anywhere else. Meanwhile the Trailblazers haven't won a playoff series in a decade and they still sell out most games.
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Old 08-11-2013, 12:48 PM
 
Location: Austin, TX
654 posts, read 1,613,929 times
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"It is just so isolated!"

This is the vague, dismissive, comeback remark of choice for residents of the east coast as a response to any positive recognition of regions outside of their own.
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Old 08-11-2013, 01:44 PM
 
Location: Seattle, Washington
1,875 posts, read 2,693,182 times
Reputation: 1157
Quote:
Originally Posted by Seatown1 View Post
My hometown team, the Detroit Pistons, sold out their arena 8-9 years straight in the '00s.
The Detroit Red Wings have the most passionate fan base in the NHL, rivaling Toronto and Montreal in fan support.
The University of Michigan has the highest seating capacity in NCAA football and fills the stadium regularly. I am a student at the University of Washington and can tell you first hand that the football passion here is second-rate compared to the Midwest. The newly-renovated Husky stadium will hold 70,000 seats. Michigan stadium holds nearly 115,000. This huge discrepancy exists because the university knows they cannot fill more than 70K.
Mariners attendance is ranked 28/30 by percentage this year. It's been this way for over a decade.
NFL has 8 home games per year so teams normally sell out. Even the Detroit Lions always sell out.

My standards are probably higher since I grew up around sports-crazed people. Seattle's not all that bad of a sports town, but just not that good in my opinion. Atlanta definitely lacks fan support. Southern Florida is probably the worst when it comes to attendance/passion.

Looking back at my original post, I can see how I sounded a bit arrogant and exaggerative.
The 2005 and 2006 mariners seasons were near the top of the league. When the mariners are good attendance goes up, simple. University of Washington doesn't need a 100,000 seat stadium, it's the top 10 loudest venues in america already, one of the best looking venues aswell off lake washington. 2007 NFL Football Attendance - National Football League - ESPN Take a look at this, By percentage the Seahawks rank top ten in the league almost every year, while Detroit is near the bottom until 2 years ago. So don't try to act like Detroit fanbase is amazing compared to Seattle because it's not. In fact their fans seem more fair weather then here by the numbers beside U of M, which ofcourse will get support. Heck even an 2007 when the Seahawks went 4-12 they ranked top 10 an attendance!
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Old 08-11-2013, 01:59 PM
 
1,981 posts, read 3,170,819 times
Reputation: 1575
Quote:
Originally Posted by Seatown1 View Post
This is false. I've lived in Seattle for 7 years and can 100% vouch that this is far from a sports town. Several Seattle Times and Seattlepi columnists agree with these sentiments.
YOU LIVE IN A CAVE!

Seahawks mania is huge right now! The P-I is dead, the Times is dying. Part of the reason is idiot sports columnists who think Tyrone Willingham can coach.

Quote:
Seattle is a fair-weather sports town.
No, it is a smart sports town. It refuses to get ripped off by inept/crooked owners unlike stupid cities that are asking for the status quo with their wallets. The TV ratings more than prove Seattle's worth.

Quote:
Sports is not engrained in the culture of this place. I am from Detroit/Chicago so I know what a sports town feels like. Husky fans are nowhere near as passionate as Michigan/Michigan State/Ohio State fans; not even on the same radar (I attend the U. of Washington and know this first hand).
That's nonsense. Again, you live in a cave. Husky Stadium is louder and more intimidating to play in than either Ann Arbor or Columbus.

Quote:
Mariners have the lowest attendance percentage in the MLB for years.
Mariners led MLB in total attendance multiple times since 2000. Just because fans are boycotting Armstrong/Lincoln doesn't make Seattle a bad baseball town. We are sick the stupidity. The TV ratings show the fans still care. The mega TV deal the Mariners just put together show that this is a valuable baseball market. A little over a decade ago the Mariners were a top 5 revenue franchise.

Quote:
Sonics' attendance has historically been very flaky, meaning that nobody attends when the team was bad but people show up when the team played well.
The Sonics attendance has always been excellent. Almost at capacity, even when the Okies were stealing the team! The Sonics led the NBA in total attendance multiple times. They set numerous NBA attendance records. First franchise to average over 20,000 fans a game over an entire season. They sold out every single game at Key Arena up until the lockout. Seattle is a top 10 NBA city.

Quote:
This is pretty common for the NBA, making Seattle pretty average when it comes to basketball. It's no LA, Chicago, or New York.
That's garbage. Per capita, Seattle exceeds those cities. The proof is on the basketball court. Seattle is a major hoops hot spot.

Quote:
Seahawks fans are mostly bandwagoners. They go to games and sell out tickets when the 'Hawks are expected to have a good season. Otherwise Century Link Field isn't anything spectacular when it comes to attendance. It is loud in there due to the stadium design and that's it.
More lies. The Seahawks were selling out games back in the 70's when most other cities were not. Multi-decade long season ticket waiting list for the Kingdome. The NFL's loudest fans. Always full during the regular season, mostly full for preseason while other cities struggle to fill seats...

Seahawks fans were loud in the Kingdome, loud in CenturyLink. Husky fans loud at Husky Stadium. Duck fans (many Seahawks fans) loud at Autzen stadium. Sonics fans loud at Key Arena. Sounders fans loud at CenturyLink.

See the trend?

Quote:
I'll give Seattle soccer because Sounders fans show up win or lose. But all in all this is far from a sports town.
3 of the 4 50,000 watt radio stations are sports radio. Seahawks, Mariners, Sonics, Huskies, and Sounders = all large attendance teams. Seattle is an elite sports city.

Quote:
There are a few reasons for Seattle's lack of sports enthusiasm:
1) Metro population was never large until the tech boom of the last '90s. The metro still isn't as large as places like Detroit, Atlanta, etc. This means that the fanbases for Seattle teams are smaller.
Seattle was once larger than Atlanta and is now similar in size to dying Detroit. Soon Seattle will be larger.

Quote:
2) Lack of media attention. Due to Seattle's geographic isolation, there are not many media outlets out here.
Again, 3 of the 4 50,000 watt blow torches = sports radio. Seattle's geographic isolation has made it a great sports city. An us vs. them.

Quote:
4) Limited success. The teams here haven't been all that successful. Only 1 championship ever. Limited playoff appearances as well.
Own goal. Further proof Seattle is an elite sports city. There are more titles when you throw in the Huskies as well.
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Old 08-11-2013, 02:08 PM
 
1,981 posts, read 3,170,819 times
Reputation: 1575
Quote:
Originally Posted by Seatown1 View Post
My hometown team, the Detroit Pistons, sold out their arena 8-9 years straight in the '00s.
Palace = ghost town these days. Seattle is by far a better NBA city than Detroit is a basketball city.


Quote:
The newly-renovated Husky stadium will hold 70,000 seats. Michigan stadium holds nearly 115,000. This huge discrepancy exists because the university knows they cannot fill more than 70K.
That's nonsense since they long averaged higher than that. The reason they can't go much higher is due to the surrounding neighborhood and its capacity to handle large events. Hopefully the future light rail extension will allow the UW to add seating capacity in the future.

Quote:
My standards are probably higher since I grew up around sports-crazed people. e.

Then get out that cave. There are tons of sports crazed people here.
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