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Old 12-30-2011, 12:49 PM
 
Location: Bothell, Washington
2,701 posts, read 4,667,251 times
Reputation: 3671

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Garfieldian View Post
Exactly, not sure what people aren't grasping. From the Mississippi and eastward, the U.S. AND Canada are far more integrated with far more population dispersement.
A lot of the west is simply inhospitable to live in to begin with.
Out of the lower 48, the Pac NW is easily the most isolated region.
Look at my light map again for reference or a topographical map which another user submitted...
Not sure what there is to even argue about.
I don't care how you "felt" out there, that is subjective, and for your one "not feeling isolated" there are plenty who do feel the disconnect, and it is a REAL one.
California is somewhat isolated itself, but there is so much population out there (the most populous state) and real world connectivity that it doesn't seem near AS isolated as the Pac NW.

So to put this in perspective again. Is it as isolated as an island (i.e Hawaii)? No.
Is Pac NW isolated? Yes of course it is, is it as isolated as an island (i.e. Hawaii)? Again, the answer is no. Is it more isolated than any other region of the U.S., yes.
I guess it depends on how you define your regions, and what you really mean by isolated. I would argue from my own living experience that much of the Rocky Mountain region is more isolated than the Pac NW is. I have lived in Billings, Montana and spent time in Wyoming and Colorado, and that area to me is more isolated than it is out here in the PacNW. And by isolated I mean simply how far you are from even a couple other major population centers. Let's say you are in the middle of Montana- you are probably farther from any major metro area at all than anywhere else in the country. And take Denver- it is really on an island because it is a long 8 hour drive to Kansas City, and probably at least that long if not longer to Salt Lake City.
Sure there are spots in the PacNW that would be equally as isolated, but with Seattle and Portland being only 3 hours apart gives a small band of pretty good population giving at least a small version of that "not seeming so isolated" feeling you mention for California. You don't even get that in much of that Rocky Mountain area or even in large swaths of the Midwest (such as North Dakota or South Dakota, places I also lived in the past).

I am not arguing that the PacNW is not isolated- it definitely is, and I agree it is one of the most isolated areas for sure. But I don't think hands down THE most isolated area, and I say that because of all of the other truly desolate, isolated areas I have lived in.
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Old 12-30-2011, 01:02 PM
 
816 posts, read 1,586,112 times
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Ummm you aren't making any sense. And this is bugging me so I will break it out for you and everybody else who isn't getting it.

The topic of this thread is [regional isolation] from the [REST of the U.S].

NOT how city A in region X is directly adjacent to larger cities in sub-region B of region X, more so than specific city C in Region Y was adjacent to sub-region D of Region Y.

Using a few geographic exceptions about "life in Nebraska" or "Seattle is between Portland and Vancouver" doesn't break the main point.

And by the way, even in Nebraska (the outer edge of the midwest) you would be closer to the rest of the U.S.
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Old 12-30-2011, 01:19 PM
 
281 posts, read 587,754 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Garfieldian View Post
. Is it more isolated than any other region of the U.S., yes.
I get the impression that you have not spent much time in the PNW. For a little perspective on how isolated it is, I can jump in my car right now and be in the bay area by this evening. I could also drive up to PDX and catch a non-stop flight to the east coast, Asia or even Europe (all of which I have done).

It also seems you might be confusing the smaller regional population with isolation and what you describe as an "inhospitable" environment when in actuality the majority of the region is very hospital, but owned or managed by the government and is therefore unavailable for development. And while a person living on the east coast may view mountains and deserts as a significant barrier, people living in the west are quite accustomed to crossing them throughout the year.
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Old 12-30-2011, 01:36 PM
 
816 posts, read 1,586,112 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Sizzle-Chest View Post
I get the impression that you have not spent much time in the PNW. For a little perspective on how isolated it is, I can jump in my car right now and be in the bay area by this evening. I could also drive up to PDX and catch a non-stop flight to the east coast, Asia or even Europe (all of which I have done).

It also seems you might be confusing the smaller regional population with isolation and what you describe as an "inhospitable" environment when in actuality the majority of the region is very hospital, but owned or managed by the government and is therefore unavailable for development. And while a person living on the east coast may view mountains and deserts as a significant barrier, people living in the west are quite accustomed to crossing them throughout the year.
From a little perspective for yourself, try picking up a map. The desert areas and high alpine are generally inhospitable. There is nothing as extreme in the rest of the contiguous U.S. which forms boundaries. Aren't the west coasters always talking about their extreme geographic variation? Can't have it both ways.
It seems as people from the Pac NW can't take a slight on them and are coming up with all kinds of ways to get out of the scenario. It is like saying Manhattan doesn't have the most skyscrapers in the U.S. for example. Pac NW is the most isolated are of the contiguous U.S., and from the rest of the U.S. isolation also does not mean it is negative, it just is. Though it is very like people to bundle up their subjective feelings when open to critique. There is a reason people view the area as soft, and it shows in just as much anecdotal evidence parallel to the same type of anecdotal evidence said posters are trying to posture with! So if something needs to hold weight, I will posture both hold equal weight. I can feel the accumulated ego of the region somehow frowning...Drat.
Again, pick up a map.
I have been to Iceland, it is isolated certainly. That doesn't mean I need to go to Bermuda to figure out that it is also isolated.
I have been to Pac NW and lived on the west coast, but my subjective experience NOR yours should have any bearing on it. It can be in ADDITION to it, being purely anecdotal to the actual, but it can't form the basis as many posters are proposing. The Pac NW is an isolated region, again see my prior posts, it breaks it down quite nicely.
I'm signing off, I can't argue with people who can't understand basic geography or logic. Happy New Years.
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Old 12-30-2011, 01:49 PM
 
Location: Bothell, Washington
2,701 posts, read 4,667,251 times
Reputation: 3671
Quote:
Originally Posted by Garfieldian View Post
Ummm you aren't making any sense. And this is bugging me so I will break it out for you and everybody else who isn't getting it.

The topic of this thread is [regional isolation] from the [REST of the U.S].

NOT how city A in region X is directly adjacent to larger cities in sub-region B of region X, more so than specific city C in Region Y was adjacent to sub-region D of Region Y.

Using a few geographic exceptions about "life in Nebraska" or "Seattle is between Portland and Vancouver" doesn't break the main point.

And by the way, even in Nebraska (the outer edge of the midwest) you would be closer to the rest of the U.S.
So now isolation is to mean simply being farther away from x number of states, as in not bordering as many as another region? I thought it meant being far from people, from population centers.
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Old 12-30-2011, 01:50 PM
 
281 posts, read 587,754 times
Reputation: 466
Okay, let's agree to a compromise: people living in the east think the pnw is isolated while people actually living in the pnw think people on the east coast enjoy telling people they're isolated when they're really not.

Last edited by Sizzle-Chest; 12-30-2011 at 02:06 PM..
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Old 12-30-2011, 02:43 PM
 
Location: Zurich, Switzerland/ Piedmont, CA
32,320 posts, read 55,123,408 times
Reputation: 15389
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sizzle-Chest View Post
Okay, let's agree to a compromise: people living in the east think the pnw is isolated while people actually living in the pnw think people on the east coast enjoy telling people they're isolated when they're really not.
I concur 100%.

Makes them feel superior. Isnt it cute?
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Old 12-30-2011, 04:49 PM
 
Location: Bellingham, WA
9,745 posts, read 14,175,460 times
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I honestly don't feel even a little isolated where I live. The most isolated I've ever felt was driving between Chicago and Seattle. Especially in the middle of nowhere in South Dakota. I've never felt further from everything else in the country.
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Old 12-30-2011, 04:53 PM
 
Location: The City
22,331 posts, read 32,138,839 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 18Montclair View Post
I concur 100%.

Makes them feel superior. Isnt it cute?
Now this is quite ironic coming from you...
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Old 12-30-2011, 05:02 PM
 
Location: The Bay and Maryland
1,362 posts, read 3,190,822 times
Reputation: 2148
I don't think the Pacific Northwest is any more isolated than anywhere else in America. Maine and the Dakotas are pretty isolated as well. However, I will say that the Pacific Northwest is often looked at distinctively different than California. When most people think of the West Coast, they think of California. Specifically the Bay Area and L.A. People think of L.A. even more so than the Bay Area when people say "West Coast". Sort of how like everyone associates NYC more with the East Coast than DC or Baltimore. The Pacific Northwest is located on the West Coast of the United States. However, the Pacific NW is different culturally and demographically than most of California. For example, when most people think of the West Coast, they think of year-round sunny mild weather, palm trees and classic American cars/tricked out low-riders. These really aren't stereotypical facets of Pacific NW culture. CA cities are also much more diverse than those in the Pacific NW, which are the Whitest big cities in America (i.e. Seattle, Portland).
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