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Old 12-30-2011, 05:11 PM
 
Location: The City
22,331 posts, read 32,138,839 times
Reputation: 7737

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Lamplight View Post
I honestly don't feel even a little isolated where I live. The most isolated I've ever felt was driving between Chicago and Seattle. Especially in the middle of nowhere in South Dakota. I've never felt further from everything else in the country.

Actually I think this is a good point. The PAC NW is not the most isolated area of the country so to speak but among major cities, Seattle and Portland are further removed than probably any other other region (Maybe Denver and SLC would also be in a similar postion in this regard.
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Old 12-30-2011, 10:18 PM
 
Location: Los Angeles
5,367 posts, read 12,972,569 times
Reputation: 5348
Quote:
Originally Posted by Garfieldian View Post
But your point makes no sense, as there are 55 million people in the midwest and it's directly adjacent to the northeast and the south...while the pac nw is directly adjacent to well...mountain ranges, forests and plateau with scarce population.
You are having trouble with comprehension by the way.
By the way Vancouver shouldn't really be in the discussion as people in Cleveland or Detroit could just as easily drive over into Canada.
What on earth are you talking about? Vancouver BC is a major canadian metropolitan area. I've driven there or took Amtrak there over 2 dozen times. It is a major city in the PNW just like Seattle and Portland.
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Old 12-30-2011, 10:28 PM
 
6,056 posts, read 10,837,768 times
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When I lived in Seattle/Pacific Northwest, I never felt isolated from the rest of the USA.

The Pacific Northwest feels like its own unique distinct region from other regions of the USA, but that does not mean it is isolated.

Hawaii and Alaska are truly the areas of the USA that feels isolated from the rest of the USA instead of the Pacific Northwest.

The culture of the Pacific Northwest is one of my favorite regional USA cultures. My other favorite regional USA cultures are Coastal California, and also the Northeast megalopolis region.
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Old 12-30-2011, 11:46 PM
 
5,767 posts, read 10,297,507 times
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"Isolated" isn't really the right word for most people in the northwest. Perhaps "regionalist" is more accurate.

Oregon and Washington are large states (and British Columbia is gigantic), but most people in the region inhabit a fairly small strip of land that starts at Eugene and runs up to Vancouver, along Interstate 5. It isn't a terribly wide area of land, either. If you drive that route, you end up going through or running past cities and towns every few miles, with little interruption.

It feels more isolated if you leave that corridor, but within the corridor, things feel busy and populated.
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Old 12-31-2011, 02:44 PM
 
8,333 posts, read 9,790,982 times
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I lived in the PNW for several years. While I didn't think it 'isolated' at all, I liked how they seemed different from other areas. It's an admirable trait, and one that keeps the area as one of the most desirable in the nation to me.
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Old 12-31-2011, 06:59 PM
 
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If I had to say that about one major region, yeah. I'd say that about the pacific northwest. not so much the southwest because there's more population there, and its closer to TX which has lots of population.

fair amount of hubs in the southwest , as long as that includes Cali. not so true of the northwest.
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Old 01-01-2012, 09:55 AM
 
Location: Lakeland, Florida
6,971 posts, read 12,478,001 times
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I feel more isolated in Portland than I do Seattle. Portland feels very small and removed from everywhere to me. Both in personality and geographical location. It is strange in personality and rather insular, and lacking in respect for viewpoints from other regions of America. Everything is politics mainly represented for certain classes of people here. It is far from everywhere, Seattle being the closest Metro at almost 200 miles north. Every other large Metro is hundreds of miles away and there are few suburbs here to this small Metro. When you leave Portland thats it unless one considers Salem and Eugene as large Metro's.

Seattle on the other hand is wedged in between two Metro's and is or feels much bigger in Metro size and personality. It is much more international in personality and commerce, and with its proximity to Vancouver BC seems much less isolated.

However I do agree the PNW in general does seem isolated from much of the USA. Both by its remote location far from the rest of the US, and the cultures here are what they are.

It pretty here though.
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Old 01-01-2012, 11:14 AM
 
605 posts, read 1,234,519 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pwright1 View Post
What on earth are you talking about? Vancouver BC is a major canadian metropolitan area. I've driven there or took Amtrak there over 2 dozen times. It is a major city in the PNW just like Seattle and Portland.

Ya I agree. Vancouver B.C. is more integrated with Seattle and Portland than most of Canada LOL.

And the reality is that Vancouver is a very lonely Canadian city on the west coast. It pretty much is the last "large//major" settlement of humans on the northwest edge of the North American continent. (Sorry, but I am not including the smaller cities north of Vancouver). You can literally draw a line north of Vancouver BC and go straight to the arctic circle without crossing much land that is actually livable for humans.

Most of the PNW is isolated due to the numerous mountain, ranges, and plateaus that create a barrier with the rest of Canada and the United States. Of course there are plenty of small towns a long the way like Billings, Spokane, Boise, lilleot, Kelowna etc. But those cities are tiny compared to anything back east. Furthermore they are relatively in the middle of no where.
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Old 01-01-2012, 12:02 PM
 
Location: Both coasts
1,582 posts, read 4,286,964 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by skihikeclimb View Post
Ya I agree. Vancouver B.C. is more integrated with Seattle and Portland than most of Canada LOL.
That's why Vancouver is the only part of Canada that is somewhat included in an American regional classification (Pacific NW)..I have heard that regional-term used when I spent time in Vancouver (it's on restaurant menus "Pacific NW cuisine", in the newspaper, etc etc)
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Old 01-01-2012, 07:39 PM
 
605 posts, read 1,234,519 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Garfieldian View Post
Cleveland or Detroit could just as easily drive over into Canada.
The main difference being that Detroit and Cleveland are not identified, nor are they really that connected with their Canadian neighbors.

Cleveland and Detroit are both close to 5 hours from Toronto by car. People in Toronto don't have much if any affinity for the cities in the rust belt across the border. Whereas Seattle and Portland have a deeper connection with Vancouver B.C. Seattle is only a 2 hour drive from the border. The culture of three cities is tied together more so than any other major cities along the border.

In conclusion British Columbia = Pacific Northwest.
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