U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > General U.S.
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
 
 
Old 04-21-2012, 03:30 PM
 
8 posts, read 11,638 times
Reputation: 14

Advertisements

I have trouble telling between a Canadian accent and a Upper Midwest (Michigan, Minnesota) accent I've heard they're very different though
Quick reply to this message

 
Old 04-21-2012, 03:47 PM
 
14,752 posts, read 28,608,889 times
Reputation: 8780
The Southern ones...how someone from TN knows that someone is from NC or GA or AL? Clueless. I'll just let Paula Deen be the "gold standard."

I do a little better with NY area, Philly, and New England, but further gradations are also challenging.
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-21-2012, 03:53 PM
 
8 posts, read 11,638 times
Reputation: 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by robertpolyglot View Post
The Southern ones...how someone from TN knows that someone is from NC or GA or AL? Clueless. I'll just let Paula Deen be the "gold standard."

I do a little better with NY area, Philly, and New England, but further gradations are also challenging.
I'm from the South and there are certainly differences. New Orleans (Nawlins), Cajun, and Charleston (Chalstin) are obviously different but there's definitely also a subtle difference between Alabama,South Virginia, Texas and Tennessee, however it's hard to tell the difference between TN and Kentucky or Alabama, North Florida and Georgia or even North Carolina and Virginia. I don't have a problem with distinguishing New York from New England but I sometimes get Philly confused with NY.
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-21-2012, 04:09 PM
 
Location: On the Great South Bay
7,131 posts, read 9,903,738 times
Reputation: 6423
Quote:
Originally Posted by ndejene View Post
texas is more of a midwestern accent
When I talk to representatives from the former AIG (now US Life) on the phone, they do indeed have a very pleasant sounding Southern accent. And they are located in Amarillo which is in the far northwestern part of Texas. So I would say that much if not most of Texas has a Southern accent.

Having said that, I cannot really distinguish different Southern accents apart. I can hear the differences, but I cannot tell what part of the South someone is from by their accent.

Anyway got to love Southern accents! Some of the best in the English speaking world.
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-21-2012, 06:01 PM
 
Location: West Tennessee
2,081 posts, read 2,898,733 times
Reputation: 1332
Quote:
Originally Posted by Florida32413 View Post
I'm from the South and there are certainly differences. New Orleans (Nawlins), Cajun, and Charleston (Chalstin) are obviously different but there's definitely also a subtle difference between Alabama,South Virginia, Texas and Tennessee, however it's hard to tell the difference between TN and Kentucky or Alabama, North Florida and Georgia or even North Carolina and Virginia. I don't have a problem with distinguishing New York from New England but I sometimes get Philly confused with NY.
Western and Eastern Tennessee sound alot different too. Eastern Tennessee has the mountain south dialect while Western Tennessee sounds a bit more like the Missouri Bootheel, Western Kentucky, Northeast Arkansas, and Northwest Mississippi.
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-21-2012, 06:39 PM
 
8 posts, read 11,638 times
Reputation: 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by GunnerTHB View Post
Western and Eastern Tennessee sound alot different too. Eastern Tennessee has the mountain south dialect while Western Tennessee sounds a bit more like the Missouri Bootheel, Western Kentucky, Northeast Arkansas, and Northwest Mississippi.
I think that's only far East Mountain Tennessee though as I can't tell the difference between somebody from Chatanooga as opposed to Memphis but I did meet some guys from Knoxville that sounded a bit different.
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-21-2012, 06:59 PM
 
3,644 posts, read 9,000,180 times
Reputation: 1798
Besides the really distinct ones, like New Orleans, different Southern accents are hard to tell apart. I think the variations have less to do with geography and more to do with social class, age, race, and rural vs urban. So in a given area of the South, you can hear many variations of the Southern accent, but you can go to another area and here the same variations. People I've met from East TN sound like a lot of people here in West TN.
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-21-2012, 07:02 PM
 
Location: Silver Springs, FL
23,440 posts, read 31,719,006 times
Reputation: 15560
I have a hard time with the western accents, such as AZ, Idaho, CO, etc.
Havent spent a lot of time there, and have never really known a lot of folks from those states.
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-21-2012, 07:35 PM
 
Location: Jersey City
6,488 posts, read 16,152,784 times
Reputation: 5637
Quote:
Originally Posted by gwillyfromphilly View Post
Well to each his own.
One of my coworkers who's from India lived here for several years before he was able to recognize that southerners and New Yorkers have different accents (initially all Americans sounded the same to him). If you're not exposed to the differences regularly, it's understandable that you might not be able to recognize them.



On a slightly different topic, Norfolk has quite a distinct accent among southern accents. But as with many localized accents, it seems to be fading away gradually. But the weird thing is that younger people in Norfolk seem to be speaking not with the "General American" accent that most accent-losers adopt, but with something of a "General Southern" accent. It seems the non-rhoticity, "oat and aboat," and other local phenomena are disappearing, and younger folks sound are speaking something more like "Nascar Southern." For instance, if you've ever watched The Ed Show on MSNBC, Ed Schultz is from Norfolk. Although Ed's not especially young (in his 50s), he speaks kind of a "generic southern," not Tidewater. It wasn't until I heard him slip up one night and say "fawwuhd" instead of "forward" that I looked him up on Wikipedia and discovered he's from Norfolk!

Anyway, do any other folks in areas with unique localized accents see a trend toward "generalization" that isn't necessarily toward "General American?"
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-21-2012, 07:42 PM
Status: "Be yourself. What's the alternative?" (set 18 days ago)
 
8,686 posts, read 10,836,637 times
Reputation: 12731
Quote:
Originally Posted by kshe95girl View Post
I have a hard time with the western accents, such as AZ, Idaho, CO, etc.
Havent spent a lot of time there, and have never really known a lot of folks from those states.
Az natives have no discernable accent that I've ever been able to hear. That's how I can tell natives--no accents.
Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


 
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:
Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > General U.S.
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top