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Old 01-09-2012, 06:33 PM
 
Location: The City
22,331 posts, read 32,143,293 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by j_cat View Post
Or at least Philly and Boston.

Now I can kind of see the Philly and NYC thing but Boston is extremely distinct from either a NY or Philly (or confused Philly for NY) accent. I honestly cant see how people cant see this distinction
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Old 01-09-2012, 06:36 PM
 
Location: Vineland, NJ
8,483 posts, read 10,460,458 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kidphilly View Post
Now I can kind of see the Philly and NYC thing but Boston is extremely distinct from either a NY or Philly (or confused Philly for NY) accent. I honestly cant see how people cant see this distinction
Definitely agree, the Boston accent to me sounds so distinct compared to the New York accent and Philly accent.
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Old 01-09-2012, 06:36 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kidphilly View Post
Now I can kind of see the Philly and NYC thing but Boston is extremely distinct from either a NY or Philly (or confused Philly for NY) accent. I honestly cant see how people cant see this distinction
Missing Rs (maybe not in Philly's case). Unusual A/O sounds. That's all some people hear. That's all I used to hear. Even now I could get it wrong if I don't hear key indicators.
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Old 01-09-2012, 06:43 PM
 
Location: The City
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Quote:
Originally Posted by j_cat View Post
Missing Rs (maybe not in Philly's case). Unusual A/O sounds. That's all some people hear. That's all I used to hear. Even now I could get it wrong if I don't hear key indicators.

Even with more mild accents you easily hear the difference between the accents IMHO


Philly rulez, Boston sucks - YouTube

Odlly the word Philadelphia is one of the easiest to distinguish between NY and Philly, if you hear people from the two places, listen how Tina says it, even with a mild Philly accent is is pretty apparent to me. And Boston is just flat out different
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Old 01-09-2012, 06:54 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kidphilly View Post
Even with more mild accents you easily hear the difference between the accents IMHO


Philly rulez, Boston sucks - YouTube

Odlly the word Philadelphia is one of the easiest to distinguish between NY and Philly, if you hear people from the two places, listen how Tina says it, even with a mild Philly accent is is pretty apparent to me. And Boston is just flat out different
I don't even hear an accent from her, so that doesn't quite help. And I didn't even know he was supposed to be from Boston. I suppose that's probably telling.
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Old 01-09-2012, 09:38 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kidphilly View Post
Even with more mild accents you easily hear the difference between the accents IMHO


Philly rulez, Boston sucks - YouTube

Odlly the word Philadelphia is one of the easiest to distinguish between NY and Philly, if you hear people from the two places, listen how Tina says it, even with a mild Philly accent is is pretty apparent to me. And Boston is just flat out different
I literally cant hear an accent from either one of them. They sound General American to my ears.
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Old 01-10-2012, 03:49 AM
 
Location: The western periphery of Terra Australis
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Smtchll View Post
I literally cant hear an accent from either one of them. They sound General American to my ears.
Me too.
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Old 01-10-2012, 01:25 PM
 
Location: The City
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Maybe it is just my ears from living in the area a long time are more acute to the subtleties. I agree neither is strong (his is stronger) but to me there are some distinct parts I hear. I guess is why I have trouble distinguishing accents from other areas.

Here are clear examples of differences


Perfect Boston Accent - YouTube


New York Accents, A Movie - YouTube


Accent... - YouTube
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Old 01-10-2012, 02:09 PM
 
Location: Jefferson City 4 days a week, St. Louis 3 days a week
2,709 posts, read 4,226,540 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BigDGeek View Post
People from the northeast mostly sound alike to me. I can hear a difference between New England vs New York/New Jersey, but that's about it.

Same with the midwest; they all sound alike to me.
I actually can tell people from the midwest apart. People from the Upper Midwest, especially around the Great Lakes area, have a slight Canadian accent, vs. further west or south, where the accent is either general american or has a slight Southern influence. I can easily tell a New England accent apart from a New York accent or Philadelphia accent...and a Baltimore one apart as well.

Finally, the Deep South and Upper South and mid-south have always been easy to distinguish for me as well. The Deep South is actually less twanged, and a richer accent, almost aristocratic. They tend to drop the "r's" in a lot of their words. It's also spoken more slowly. Then of course, you get into more complicated southern accents, like Tidewater, Piedmont, etc.

That said, general American I cannot distinguish very easily. If you tell me you were born and raised in the country and have a neutral accent, especially if you happen to a baby-boomer, which seems to be the last generation that follows the traditional boundaries of many dialects, I would conclude that you are either from the central Midwest or the west.
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Old 01-10-2012, 06:36 PM
 
Location: The western periphery of Terra Australis
24,683 posts, read 45,352,353 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by stlouisan View Post
I actually can tell people from the midwest apart. People from the Upper Midwest, especially around the Great Lakes area, have a slight Canadian accent, vs. further west or south, where the accent is either general american or has a slight Southern influence. I can easily tell a New England accent apart from a New York accent or Philadelphia accent...and a Baltimore one apart as well.

Finally, the Deep South and Upper South and mid-south have always been easy to distinguish for me as well. The Deep South is actually less twanged, and a richer accent, almost aristocratic. They tend to drop the "r's" in a lot of their words. It's also spoken more slowly. Then of course, you get into more complicated southern accents, like Tidewater, Piedmont, etc.

That said, general American I cannot distinguish very easily. If you tell me you were born and raised in the country and have a neutral accent, especially if you happen to a baby-boomer, which seems to be the last generation that follows the traditional boundaries of many dialects, I would conclude that you are either from the central Midwest or the west.
I would say the slight 'Canadian' accent is Upper Midwest - the Dakotas, parts of Nebraska, and especially Minnesota and Wisconsin. The Great Lakes accent, with the NCVS, seems a different thing entirely (typical Chicago, Cleveland or Buffalo accent).

The different southern accents are easy to pick apart. First you have the generic Southern/country music type accent which is really mostly a Texas/Upland South Accent - it's twangy, nasal, what most people think of as Southern. Then the Lowland/Piedmont/Deep South accent, e.g. a Streetcar named Desire/Foghorn Leghorn which is getting rarer these days. That's what people mostly talk about when they talk about the 'southern drawl.' This accent is also known for dropping of 'r's (non-rhotic) and can also be heard in a lot of movies to do with the Civil Rights set in the Deep South. The New Orleans/Louisiana accent is French-influenced and different altogether.
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