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Old 01-10-2012, 07:28 PM
 
Location: Mobile,Al(the city by the bay)
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I was suprised that the black Atlanta accent is a heavier southern dialect than coastal Alabama.
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Old 01-10-2012, 09:52 PM
 
Location: USA
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Trimac20 View Post
I would say the slight 'Canadian' accent is Upper Midwest - the Dakotas, parts of Nebraska, and especially Minnesota and Wisconsin. The Great Lakes accent, with the NCVS, seems a different thing entirely (typical Chicago, Cleveland or Buffalo accent).

The different southern accents are easy to pick apart. First you have the generic Southern/country music type accent which is really mostly a Texas/Upland South Accent - it's twangy, nasal, what most people think of as Southern. Then the Lowland/Piedmont/Deep South accent, e.g. a Streetcar named Desire/Foghorn Leghorn which is getting rarer these days. That's what people mostly talk about when they talk about the 'southern drawl.' This accent is also known for dropping of 'r's (non-rhotic) and can also be heard in a lot of movies to do with the Civil Rights set in the Deep South. The New Orleans/Louisiana accent is French-influenced and different altogether.
Movie accents esp. southern ones are often incorrect and exaggerated for effect. Non rhotic accents are more common in the eastern deep south (or were) than say east Texas s Ark n La areas. You really don't hear that part of the accent anymore much anywhere now. Mr. Ward Burton who was a nascar driver from the Va Piedmont has the non rhotic accent down good.
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Old 01-10-2012, 10:15 PM
 
Location: The Magnolia City
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hdwell View Post
Movie accents esp. southern ones are often incorrect and exaggerated for effect. Non rhotic accents are more common in the eastern deep south (or were) than say east Texas s Ark n La areas. You really don't hear that part of the accent anymore much anywhere now. Mr. Ward Burton who was a nascar driver from the Va Piedmont has the non rhotic accent down good.
Well, there are certainly some aspects of non-rhotic throughout the entirety of the Deep South, to include East Texas and Louisiana. I'm not as sure about Arkansas.
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Old 01-10-2012, 11:17 PM
 
Location: Jefferson City 4 days a week, St. Louis 3 days a week
2,709 posts, read 4,230,797 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Trimac20 View Post
I would say the slight 'Canadian' accent is Upper Midwest - the Dakotas, parts of Nebraska, and especially Minnesota and Wisconsin. The Great Lakes accent, with the NCVS, seems a different thing entirely (typical Chicago, Cleveland or Buffalo accent).

The different southern accents are easy to pick apart. First you have the generic Southern/country music type accent which is really mostly a Texas/Upland South Accent - it's twangy, nasal, what most people think of as Southern. Then the Lowland/Piedmont/Deep South accent, e.g. a Streetcar named Desire/Foghorn Leghorn which is getting rarer these days. That's what people mostly talk about when they talk about the 'southern drawl.' This accent is also known for dropping of 'r's (non-rhotic) and can also be heard in a lot of movies to do with the Civil Rights set in the Deep South. The New Orleans/Louisiana accent is French-influenced and different altogether.
The funny thing about the NCVS is that St. Louis has also adopted it. The I-55 corridor from Chicago to St. Louis has essentially channeled the NCVS southwest from Chicago through Springfield to St. Louis. So St. Louis has undergone the NCVS...it is the only city in the Midwest south of the Great Lakes to my knowledge to adopt it. The rest of the area surrounding it speaks South Midland, which features a couple of southern influences. The traditional St. Louis accent was certainly unique, and Chicago's is to a slight extent as well. People with a traditional St. Louis working class accent never say "or"...they say "ar" instead...forty becames "farty", your's="yar's", forest=farest, etc.
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Old 01-10-2012, 11:24 PM
 
Location: Jefferson City 4 days a week, St. Louis 3 days a week
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Nairobi View Post
Well, there are certainly some aspects of non-rhotic throughout the entirety of the Deep South, to include East Texas and Louisiana. I'm not as sure about Arkansas.
Arkansas to me is a sophisticated blend between a Deep South and Upper South/mid-south accent. I've heard elements of both in the state. But yes, Louisiana does indeed have the Deep South accent...it is as much a part of the Deep South as any other state. Florida at one time was the Deep South...not anymore, due to cultural dilution caused by Latin, Midwestern, Northeastern, and western migrants. The undisputed Deep South states are Louisiana, Mississippi, Alabama, Georgia, and South Carolina.
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Old 01-11-2012, 07:55 AM
 
Location: The Magnolia City
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Quote:
Originally Posted by stlouisan View Post
Arkansas to me is a sophisticated blend between a Deep South and Upper South/mid-south accent. I've heard elements of both in the state. But yes, Louisiana does indeed have the Deep South accent...it is as much a part of the Deep South as any other state. Florida at one time was the Deep South...not anymore, due to cultural dilution caused by Latin, Midwestern, Northeastern, and western migrants. The undisputed Deep South states are Louisiana, Mississippi, Alabama, Georgia, and South Carolina.
I might be wrong, but I wasn't aware that southern Florida was ever considered part of the Deep South. North Florida certainly is, today, as is East Texas.
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Old 01-11-2012, 11:58 AM
 
Location: The City
22,331 posts, read 32,176,306 times
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Great accent and maybe my favorite opening question/rant at a post game press conference Bobby Herbert and LSU

Sounds almost like a Canadian hockey player (well french canadian anyway)


Bobby Hebert criticizes Les Miles on BCS loss - YouTube
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Old 01-11-2012, 04:56 PM
 
Location: USA
2,779 posts, read 6,690,021 times
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Well excuse me Nairobi and ST Louisan, I just don't know what I'm talking about. I only live here y'know. Really if anyone down heeyah was to talk like you two seem to have it pegged, I wouldn't contest. But I never here such pronunciation. You're basing your opinion on old steriotypes that need to disappear forever. Fowah whut its woith. I never ever hear such. Nevah, evah. Hahaha.
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Old 01-11-2012, 08:16 PM
 
Location: The Magnolia City
8,931 posts, read 11,809,128 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hdwell View Post
Well excuse me Nairobi and ST Louisan, I just don't know what I'm talking about. I only live here y'know. Really if anyone down heeyah was to talk like you two seem to have it pegged, I wouldn't contest. But I never here such pronunciation. You're basing your opinion on old steriotypes that need to disappear forever. Fowah whut its woith. I never ever hear such. Nevah, evah. Hahaha.
I'm from down south, too. I'm not saying that non-rhotic accents are all over the south, but I was just saying that there are some elements of it throughout the Deep South.
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Old 01-12-2012, 08:17 AM
 
99 posts, read 198,975 times
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Nobody wants to believe they have an accent.
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