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Old 01-03-2012, 09:06 PM
 
1,495 posts, read 1,947,888 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ohiogirl81 View Post
although how much I benefit from pothole-riddled streets is questionable
How much do you benefit from having a job?
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Old 01-04-2012, 08:34 AM
 
Location: Springfield VA
4,037 posts, read 8,080,713 times
Reputation: 1499
Quote:
Originally Posted by j_cat View Post
I have happily made the move from suburbs to city, but I'm not one for dancing on graves. There was a reason Americans moved to the suburbs in the first place, and we need to remember the lessons from those times, lest we repeat them.
How reasonable and sensible. Why are some city boosters dancing on graves. Why can't both suburb and city prosper?

Quote:
Originally Posted by btownboss4 View Post
Ok this is suburban growth/City Growth
Boston 7/1
Atlanta 40.3/1
Washington Dc 38.9/1
San Francisco 7/1

I did this by finding the total growth and subtracting the growth in the city to get suburban growth, then dividing by the city growth to get an x/1 ratio.
* if you have a problem with my math please point it out so I can fix it.
Good job! b Interesting stats. Yeah I'm not surprised about DC. I guess I'm part of the 38.9.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Ohiogirl81 View Post
Moderator cut: off topic/personal Many cities levy an earned income tax on the people who work in those cities. I pay 3.4 (within a percentage point or two) percent of my income to Philadelphia, more than I pay to the state of Pennsylvania. Because of reciprocation, I do not pay income tax to the suburb in which I live.

My suburb is subsidizing street repairs, emergency services, and garbage pickup in Philadelphia.



I may be benefiting from city services (although how much I benefit from pothole-riddled streets is questionable, and my employer uses a private trash hauler), but I'm also paying through the nose for them.


Yeah, I've noticed that many city neighborhoods are out of the reach of many middle income and working class folks. Guess we're stuck living in the 'burbs, where housing is more affordable.
Really so Philly gets your tax dollars but not the community you actually live in? That sucks. But yeah us suburbanites are so evil practically snatching food from the mouths of babes. Along with kicking puppies and little old ladies.

Quote:
Originally Posted by j_cat View Post
Interesting. Still hoping someone can do year by year, because I suspect the ratios are gradually getting smaller in most metros. But thanks for that.
Census doesn't work like that. They do estimates but as someone pointed out they aren't always accurate. Only every ten years.
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Old 01-04-2012, 08:48 AM
 
Location: Springfield VA
4,037 posts, read 8,080,713 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by j_cat View Post
How much do you benefit from having a job?
That's a loaded question. I thought we weren't dancing on graves. There seems to be some implication that she "owes" the city of Philadelphia for having a gosh darn job! She already pays taxes to a city she doens't live in what more do you want?

I say this as someone who sometimes thinks about moving to the city. However, for me and for millions of Americans my job is deep in the suburbs. I used to live 10-15 minutes from downtown DC but moved further out into the suburbs to be closer to work (only to have my office transferred to a place even further from downtown). For me there's just more opportunity in the suburbs. I've had opportunities to live in the city for cheap thanks to friends but the commute to opportunities in the suburbs would be too much to bear (not to mention I hear income tax is higher in the District).

Some suburbs are on the decline. However, I can not say the same about the suburbs of DC. The District is growing and starting to prosper which is great but if its a competition (which it so isn't) then the suburbs still win. Because of the volatility of my job and just life in general, I've moved around a lot in the past 4 years and its always been here in the Virginia suburbs. The housing is newer and cheaper. There are more jobs in the suburbs. Let's not even get started on the schools for those with children. If you prefer city living then good for you but realize that cities have a long way to go before the majority of Americans choose them over suburban living. Nowadays I'm meeting a LOT of reverse commuters. There will always be some opportunities in the city but depending on one's field there will always be MORE opportunities in the suburbs as well. City and suburb need to find a way to co-exist instead of the us v them mentality that seems to be oh so trendy.
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Old 01-04-2012, 08:58 AM
 
Location: North by Northwest
7,442 posts, read 9,883,454 times
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That's why I love inner-ring suburbs (eg, Philadelphia's Main Line, Chicago's North Shore, Bethesda/Chevy Chase/Arlington in DC). They feature most of the pros cities and suburbs respectively have to offer without many of the cons.
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Old 01-04-2012, 09:19 AM
 
Location: The City
22,331 posts, read 32,166,272 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by terrence81 View Post
How reasonable and sensible. Why are some city boosters dancing on graves. Why can't both suburb and city prosper?



Good job! b Interesting stats. Yeah I'm not surprised about DC. I guess I'm part of the 38.9.



Really so Philly gets your tax dollars but not the community you actually live in? That sucks. But yeah us suburbanites are so evil practically snatching food from the mouths of babes. Along with kicking puppies and little old ladies.



Census doesn't work like that. They do estimates but as someone pointed out they aren't always accurate. Only every ten years.
Am pretty sure there is a tax sharing. Meaning income tax in this area levied based on where you work/reside. Some rates are higher (ie Philadelphia) so as a resident or employee in Philly you pay. So say the Philly rate is 4% and the local burb rate is 1.5%. Philly will with withold the 4% and transfer the 1.5% to the local burb of residence. Effectively 1.5% to the burb, 2.5% to Philly. If you work in the burb and reside in the city, the city gets all 4%. Employment/occupation taxes also exist in some areas. Typically these are taken one time based on where you work and range from 50 to 400 bucks to the best of my knowledge

Local Income tax is also deductable on your federal return effectively reducing ones AGI to determine Federal Income tax, though obviously that only provides relief for a portion of the absolute
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Old 01-04-2012, 09:30 AM
 
Location: Mexico City, formerly Columbus, Ohio
13,103 posts, read 13,491,061 times
Reputation: 5778
Quote:
Originally Posted by btownboss4 View Post
In metro Atlanta 1.613 Million people moved to the suburbs, 0.04 Million moved to Atlanta.
The Sun Belt cities are the ones still seeing the most suburban growth, but even there, most of that growth was pre-recession. The recession has changed things and may have altered building practices for decades to come. Most older cities in the North saw population growth in their urban centers for the first time in many years beginning with the 2010 census. I know that here in Ohio, suburban growth has plummeted while city losses have either stabilized or begun to grow again, and it began happening in the early 2000s. The trend only accelerated during the recession. Cleveland, Columbus and Cincinnati are all seeing billions of dollars in development to their urban cores, something that hasn't happened since the 1960s.
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Old 01-04-2012, 09:31 AM
 
Location: Baltimore, Maryland
374 posts, read 346,066 times
Reputation: 458
One of the things people are missing is that yes people are still moving to the suburbs, but who? A lot more poor folks are these days where as cities are increasingly attracting highly educated young professionals. This is a fact and the 2010 census proves it. Suburbs are still growing faster, but are now picking up lower income groups. It'll be interesting to see how they handle it.
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Old 01-04-2012, 10:15 AM
 
Location: Philaburbia
32,378 posts, read 59,846,787 times
Reputation: 54025
Quote:
Originally Posted by terrence81 View Post
Really so Philly gets your tax dollars but not the community you actually live in? That sucks.
Oh, I pay property taxes to the home community, along with separate service fees. It never ends.

Quote:
Originally Posted by j_cat View Post
How much do you benefit from having a job?
Not as much as I would if I weren't paying a boatload of income taxes to a city that provides me with pothole-ridden roads and malfunctioning traffic lights.
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Old 01-04-2012, 10:18 AM
 
998 posts, read 1,041,259 times
Reputation: 533
Quote:
Originally Posted by TommyCarcetti View Post
One of the things people are missing is that yes people are still moving to the suburbs, but who? A lot more poor folks are these days where as cities are increasingly attracting highly educated young professionals. This is a fact and the 2010 census proves it. Suburbs are still growing faster, but are now picking up lower income groups. It'll be interesting to see how they handle it.
Yes the young people move to the cities. After they have children & start comparing school systems, street influence & need more room, they run from the city even if it means lower pay.
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Old 01-04-2012, 03:04 PM
 
Location: Rochester, NY
466 posts, read 829,306 times
Reputation: 874
Quote:
Originally Posted by TommyCarcetti View Post
One of the things people are missing is that yes people are still moving to the suburbs, but who? A lot more poor folks are these days where as cities are increasingly attracting highly educated young professionals. This is a fact and the 2010 census proves it. Suburbs are still growing faster, but are now picking up lower income groups. It'll be interesting to see how they handle it.
This hasn't been the case around here. And for the most part, the 22-30 age range has always wanted to live in the city. When I was that age myself, my friends and everyone I knew lived in various neighborhoods in the city. As everyone began getting married and having kids, they all left for the suburbs. That's still that case today, at least here. I don't know how it is in other cities around the country. But in Rochester, the city school district is a disaster. If you have kids, you move to the suburbs as all of them have excellent schools.
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