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Old 01-03-2012, 09:40 PM
 
Location: Montgomery County, MD
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Even before I opened this thread I was thinking Pittsburgh. The town has so much going for it like a decent economy, cool quirky stuff and very low cost of living. Its also relatively close to DC, Philly and NYC and I think a lot of hipsters are already fleeing those places and moving there.
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Old 01-03-2012, 10:41 PM
 
Location: Cleveland Suburbs
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I have to agree with some of the responses on here. Milwaukee, Buffalo, and Pittsburgh all come to mind.

Milwaukee is just living in Chicago's shadow, but that's a good thing. Milwaukee has an awesome park system, an even better lakefront, and a good housing stock (even though its quality is mediocre). Museums are decent there, and the Third Ward is a good time. Affordability is great here!

I hope Pittsburgh's love from the media doesn't make it become some crazy haven place where affordability and quality of its neighborhoods sends it downhill. Colleges, the topography, cultural amenities are all good here!

Buffalo is extremely affordable, has some good neighborhoods, and the museums there are also great! I think out of all three, Buffalo is flying the most under the radar, but the trendiness factor will come into play soon with Buffalo. It has a stable economy and good housing stock.
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Old 01-03-2012, 10:44 PM
 
Location: Cleveland Suburbs
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Quote:
Originally Posted by caphillsea77 View Post
Real World



True, though young people will always be drawn to it regardless



Most of the Rustbelt, shortlist being

St. Louis
Madison (not so much rustbelt, but has a draw for hipsters)
Columbus
Pittsburgh
There are cities in the Great Lakes region of the country that just aren't rustbelt.

Minneapolis, Columbus, and Madison come to mind.
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Old 01-03-2012, 11:36 PM
 
Location: In the heights
22,231 posts, read 23,751,992 times
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I was thinking a more "realistic" option might be Philadelphia--it's not really considered trendy at this point, more middle of the road than anything.

Anyhow, Salt Lake City would be fun. Mountains and that Great Salt Lake. In the middle of the Mormon belt buckle. It'd be nice for the Salt Lake Valley to have some kind of urban growth boundary so at least some of the valley can be kept as either farmland or left to nature, but I'm guessing that's just not possible.
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Old 01-03-2012, 11:47 PM
 
9,967 posts, read 14,645,703 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by caphillsea77 View Post

Boise, ID: Good call. Boise is poised for population and economic growth, a good downtown, could attract the ski bunnies and dudes (Sun Valley on weekends), and attract the kind of hipsters drawn to Seattle, Portland (or Denver) minus all the homeless people.
There's kind of a running joke in Portland I've heard when people who've been here a while are talking about all the changes and gentrification around town and wonder where the "new Portland" is--and the answer is often Boise... Meaning that Boise is similar to where Portland was 25-30 years ago.

Though on the other hand I don't see Boise becoming the new Seattle or Portland. Despite being nominally part of the Northwest(depending on if you include Idaho in that designation), Boise feels a little different to me. More conservative in some ways and a little more clean cut and with a lot fewer pretentions. All in all it's probably closer to Salt Lake City and Denver. Portland and Seattle always had a kind of a funkier vibe that attracted disaffected East Coasters and Midwesterners looking for a cheaper artistic scene(in past years at least).

That being said, I hear downtown Boise is getting a lot trendier these days--I know people from Idaho who decided to move back there after stints in Seattle and Portland, and there's a decent number of music venues, bands, bars, and restaurants. A good number of events in the summer as well. It's still very unhyped and off the radar. Definitely attractive for those who love the outdoors with the good access to skiing and the mountains--and I see it attracting a similar demographic to those that flock to Denver--it could sort of resemble a smaller version of that city on some levels.
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Old 01-03-2012, 11:52 PM
 
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Boise and SLC are completely heinous! Boise is surrounded by endless rolling hills of nothing and SLC sprawls out into oblivion!
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Old 01-04-2012, 12:12 AM
 
Location: Both coasts
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agree with Pittsburgh...never really think of that city, but have noticed more (positive) light shed onto the place over the last few yrs..have to see for myself
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Old 01-04-2012, 12:18 AM
 
Location: Cleveland Suburbs
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Sizzle-Chest View Post
Boise and SLC are completely heinous! Boise is surrounded by endless rolling hills of nothing and SLC sprawls out into oblivion!
I did like all the development and transit-oriented development I saw in downtown SLC last I was there. They are building a new mall there (attractive with good quality materials) downtown instead of out in Sandy, so that's a plus. The area is still far too conservative and just backwards for me though.

I was in Boise mid 2011 and it was a big yawn. Only plus for me was the skiing nearby. Sun Valley was nice, but nothing on Park City.
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Old 01-04-2012, 02:17 AM
 
Location: Duluth, Minnesota, USA
7,653 posts, read 15,365,221 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SyraBrian View Post
Because of the late 1980's through early 1990's baby boom, any city that becomes trendy could see a large increase in population relatively quickly.

That's why Pittsburgh or Buffalo could surge. The housing stock is already in place.
Yes, Buffalo seems like a candidate too.
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Old 01-04-2012, 02:19 AM
 
Location: Duluth, Minnesota, USA
7,653 posts, read 15,365,221 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Traveler87 View Post
There are cities in the Great Lakes region of the country that just aren't rustbelt.

Minneapolis, Columbus, and Madison come to mind.
Minneapolis and Madison are already infested by hipsters.
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