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Old 01-06-2012, 09:07 PM
 
56,564 posts, read 80,847,919 times
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Slow, but steady and smart growth is fine with me.
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Old 01-07-2012, 01:02 AM
 
Location: Both coasts
1,582 posts, read 4,288,128 times
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18 million people within a 1 hr radius from where I live..no thanks to faster growth

However when I lived in smaller cities, I did wish there was more population/ growth spurts..perspectives can change very quickly
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Old 01-07-2012, 01:07 AM
 
Location: North Texas
23,991 posts, read 32,804,883 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Workaholic? View Post
American media is fascinated with boom towns with rapidly growing populations. In the 1990s places like Phoenix, Las Vegas, Atlanta, Charlotte, and Dallas were described as just wonderful because their populations were booming. The media really promoted cities that thousands of new residents were moving to every month.

Look at the cities on that list above today. The boom has turned into a bust and now they are full of empty homes, high unemployment and lots of social problems. While cities that never experienced a boom but just grew slowly are doing much better. (Places like Des Moines, Omaha, Pittsburgh and Minneapolis)

But maybe you see booming towns differently. Do you wish your hometown was growing faster?
God no...my hometown is Dallas and not only do I wish people would stop moving here, I wish people would move away. We don't have enough water or electrical capacity to sustain the population we already have.

Please stop moving to Texas, people!
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Old 01-07-2012, 01:32 AM
 
Location: Underneath the Pecan Tree
15,989 posts, read 30,671,383 times
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Do I wish my hometown [Waco] grew faster?? Yes. What I like about growth is the postives that come along with it. New developments, new people, new cultures, new infrastructure,etc

However, I live in Houston now and no I don't wish for faster growth. The growth here is controlled, but messy.
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Old 01-07-2012, 01:58 AM
 
Location: Metro Atlanta & Savannah, GA - Corpus Christi, TX
4,471 posts, read 7,287,827 times
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My hometown is Savannah, Georgia. Yes, I do wish my hometown saw faster growth, but I want it to be SMART growth.
Most of the growth I've seen taking place there is suburban sprawl. While some of it is fine, I would rather places like Pooler, Rincon, Port Wentworth and Richmond Hill grow smarter. Main Street growth, not anytown-USA growth. Downtown Savannah has seen a fair amount of revitalization in the past 20 years. A lot of the newer buildings are hotels. I would much rather they be condos/permanent residents that will help strengthen the downtown economy and become less reliant on tourists and SCAD.
The key to good, smart growth is good leadership which is a result of educated people. We need to invest more on our education. This will, in theory, give us better leadership which can help influence higher paying jobs to relocate to town, etc, etc.
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Old 01-07-2012, 04:08 AM
 
511 posts, read 2,084,439 times
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A little growth is fine but people seem to want population growth without limits or environmental rules. No one seemed to complain when they cut down a 1000 acre old growth forest outsito make cooker cutter homes and strip malls. When I talked to people about it they seemed unconcerned and said it was progress. Progress to me would be to save half of the forest in common areas and build the rest of it in smart high dentisty development- up not out.
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Old 01-07-2012, 07:59 AM
 
Location: Pittsburgh PA
1,127 posts, read 1,966,159 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by f1000 View Post
18 million people within a 1 hr radius from where I live..no thanks to faster growth

However when I lived in smaller cities, I did wish there was more population/ growth spurts..perspectives can change very quickly
your area might very well be adding one more person within the next couple of years Hard to argue with the weather of SoCal
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Old 01-07-2012, 09:03 AM
JJG
 
Location: Fort Worth
13,247 posts, read 19,173,700 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BigDGeek View Post
God no...my hometown is Dallas and not only do I wish people would stop moving here, I wish people would move away. We don't have enough water or electrical capacity to sustain the population we already have.

Please stop moving to Texas, people!
Well, tell Texas to stop doing so well over the past decade and a half....
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Old 01-07-2012, 07:50 PM
 
Location: Cleveland bound with MPLS in the rear-view
5,530 posts, read 10,135,719 times
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I lived in the "more ideal" slower growth/moderate growth area of Minneapolis, and although I prefer that kind of growth over hyper booms/busts, I still wish it'd grow a bit faster......something like 13%-18%, or anything under 20% every decade. Over 20% is too fast, IMO.
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Old 01-08-2012, 04:12 AM
 
511 posts, read 2,084,439 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by west336 View Post
I lived in the "more ideal" slower growth/moderate growth area of Minneapolis, and although I prefer that kind of growth over hyper booms/busts, I still wish it'd grow a bit faster......something like 13%-18%, or anything under 20% every decade. Over 20% is too fast, IMO.
How does fast growth something like 13%-18%, make the quality of life any better? Just because they replace forest and farm with more strip malls and cooker cutter subdivisions how does this help YOU and I?
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