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Old 01-10-2012, 11:46 AM
 
1,653 posts, read 5,159,266 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ckhthankgod View Post
Well, I was thinking in terms of the whole area and it is the biggest city in that area. What about the seafood and other southern cuisine? Perhaps I should have said Norfolk.
I've actually read a few articles recently about Norfolk becoming a "foodie" place. And seafood is a given in the Norfolk area. Tons of great, locally owned seafood joints that serve freshly caught fish from the Bay and Atlantic. I will say that there isn't much in the way of "southern" cuisine. There's a few places here-and-there, but you have to look for them.
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Old 01-10-2012, 12:08 PM
 
Location: Durham, NC
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Living on the beach near Charleston or Savannah means you are in the line of fire for hurricanes and will likely have to board up your windows at least once every few years. You'll also have a lot of extra maintenance due to the sea breeze that carries a lot of salt to your house, rusting out just about any exposed metal there is. Things like AC units generally only last about half as long in a beachfront home in the southeast as they do on a home not on the coast due to the harsh environment. And if you want to enjoy that nice sea view afforded from your oceanfront location, you'll need to wash those windows almost weekly to get all the seaspray grime off. It's quite different than beachfront living in SoCal.
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Old 01-10-2012, 12:39 PM
 
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With that income you could get beachfront in metro Cleveland. Lake Erie in the right spots can be very warm, clean, and tranquil. Also, areas of Chicago.

Not salted water, but you can't see the other side and the waves can get big!
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Old 01-10-2012, 05:53 PM
 
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A place I'm surprised no one mentioned is Providence. You have seafood, Italian, Portuguese based and Latin American cuisine. It is close enough to the ocean and perhaps places like Newport or Middletown would be alternatives.
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Old 01-10-2012, 06:26 PM
 
Location: roaming gnome
12,391 posts, read 24,555,922 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mdp_az View Post
Living on the beach near Charleston or Savannah means you are in the line of fire for hurricanes and will likely have to board up your windows at least once every few years. You'll also have a lot of extra maintenance due to the sea breeze that carries a lot of salt to your house, rusting out just about any exposed metal there is. Things like AC units generally only last about half as long in a beachfront home in the southeast as they do on a home not on the coast due to the harsh environment. And if you want to enjoy that nice sea view afforded from your oceanfront location, you'll need to wash those windows almost weekly to get all the seaspray grime off. It's quite different than beachfront living in SoCal.
This is true, I grew up literally on the beach... so many bike chains rusted from the salt, along with other things.
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Old 01-10-2012, 08:57 PM
 
Location: Oak Park, IL
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Quote:
Originally Posted by grapico View Post
I hear it isn't that difficult to immigrate to Australia. They need a lot of medical/psych/social work type people.
Physicians in America are paid significantly higher than almost anywhere else in the world. This means moving overseas will usually result in a significant loss of income. Now, maximizing income is not the be all/end all in life, but most people would probably think long and hard about making a career decision resulting in a loss of 1/3 to 1/2 of their income.

Also, an income of 350k is plenty to have a lakefront high rise in Chicago, but it definitely won't buy you a lakefront SFH in a desirable neighborhood.
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Old 01-10-2012, 10:12 PM
 
Location: where u wish u lived
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kidphilly View Post
Well if they would consider toughing out the snow an option though probably a little different than the coastal living of the west coast.

If being a foodie is the top criteria then NYC, Chicago, and SF are best; the next set are LA, Philly, and Boston IMHO

Living on the beach is different on the East Coast as you will in general be a little further from the actual city wheras in LA and SD and SF (to a little lessor extent) you are closer.

Chicago if you can believe the lake is the ocean isnt bad either.
How the heck is Chicago and SF better food cities than LA? LA gives NYC a run for its money never mind the other 2, LA has more diversity than NYC nuff said.
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Old 01-10-2012, 11:54 PM
 
Location: In the heights
22,114 posts, read 23,634,230 times
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Originally Posted by CaliSon View Post
How the heck is Chicago and SF better food cities than LA? LA gives NYC a run for its money never mind the other 2, LA has more diversity than NYC nuff said.
There are probably a number of reasons for why SF does so well in that regard. It's got pretty good fresh seafood coming in at all times. It has an incredibly productive valley for produce to its immediate east and another one for high-end wines within its metro (and not just wines though). It has an overall very affluent population who can and do spend a great deal on food. It's also an area that places a really strong emphasis on dining experience which is why you have people like Thomas Keller setting up shop there.

Also, it's arguable that LA does not have more diversity as much of LA's population is rooted in Mexico and Central America while NYC has a far more even spread. It's also likely that the greater frequency of dining out in NYC (and possibly the Bay Area, but I don't actually know that) along with a far smaller number of fast food and quick sit down chains (LA outside of the Westside, Downtown, the areas adjacent to downtown, and the San Gabriel Valley is huge on chains) might also play a part. However, LA should be considered a top food city except for maybe the high-end dining range unless you throw in Las Vegas.
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Old 01-11-2012, 09:30 AM
 
Location: Village of Patchogue, NY
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NYC. You have the Hamptons in the summer. 5 hours from California, 5 hours from Europe.

2nd choice: Miami.
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Old 01-11-2012, 09:10 PM
 
1,586 posts, read 1,538,718 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CaliSon View Post
How the heck is Chicago and SF better food cities than LA? LA gives NYC a run for its money never mind the other 2, LA has more diversity than NYC nuff said.
I've heard that LA's food reputation has really suffered in recent years -- when it comes to the high-end stuff, at least. The Michelin Guide gives 23 stars to Chicago restaurants, including two three-star establishments. It lists a total of 342 restaurants there. San Francisco has 541 restaurants -- that's more than Paris -- with 47 stars, and also has two with three-star ratings. Los Angeles had 263 listings and got 20 stars with no three-star restaurants, and then Michelin bailed out. That last guide was published in 2008.

Michelin's is just one opinion, of course, but it also happens to be the most respected opinion in the world.
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