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Old 01-08-2012, 12:09 PM
 
Location: a swanky suburb in my fancy pants
3,391 posts, read 7,568,371 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by HtownLove View Post
even though the development isn't stretched to cover the vast land areas of the metro, the development style is still a high percentage of single family homes though.

the developed areas may be smaller, but the development style is still sprawly
LOL sprawly?
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Old 01-08-2012, 12:10 PM
 
1,495 posts, read 1,950,229 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by HtownLove View Post
even though the development isn't stretched to cover the vast land areas of the metro, the development style is still a high percentage of single family homes though.

the developed areas may be smaller, but the development style is still sprawly
Yes, it is sprawly. Trust me, I lived there for more than a decade, and I'm just starting to get a handle on it, long after leaving.

Then again, in Phoenix as in most of the West, the lot sizes are relatively small and there are very few gaps in development, and most people just take that for granted.
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Old 01-08-2012, 12:14 PM
 
Location: Oakland, CA
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I think the best definition would be: In what proportion of the metro area is it possible to live without using a car everyday? If you have to drive to work, to school, to shop, to socialize, and you barely know the people in your neighborhood, then the area is probably a sprawl-fest.

I'm guessing Honolulu and New York City are the least sprawly metros.
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Old 01-08-2012, 12:24 PM
 
Location: Up on the moon laughing down on you
18,509 posts, read 28,201,873 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by usuario View Post
I think the best definition would be: In what proportion of the metro area is it possible to live without using a car everyday? If you have to drive to work, to school, to shop, to socialize, and you barely know the people in your neighborhood, then the area is probably a sprawl-fest.

I'm guessing Honolulu and New York City are the least sprawly metros.
lol, that is a horrible definition.

I have been to many condense areas where the neighbors hardly new each other.

In my cousin's small town in England you can walk everywhere but everyone still had cars. He drove me to the train station everyday before I realized the station was only a 15 min walk away.

Then on the flip side I have been in metros that went on forever but people did without cars. Just because you can do without cars doesn't mean the metro does not sprawl. The NY area isn't exactly one I would say that doesn't sprawl.
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Old 01-08-2012, 12:30 PM
 
1,495 posts, read 1,950,229 times
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Originally Posted by usuario View Post
you barely know the people in your neighborhood
Yeah this part's kind of random. I live in an apartment building in a big city and I barely know my neighbors. Why? Well partly because I don't really want to know them! So this knowing-your-neighbors bit is rather off-topic for talking about sprawl.

But I see that you're in Charlottesville so I'll just chalk your comments up to a small-town perspective (which is not a bad thing).
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Old 01-08-2012, 12:30 PM
 
Location: a swanky suburb in my fancy pants
3,391 posts, read 7,568,371 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by HtownLove View Post
lol, that is a horrible definition.

I have been to many condense areas where the neighbors hardly new each other.

In my cousin's small town in England you can walk everywhere but everyone still had cars. He drove me to the train station everyday before I realized the station was only a 15 min walk away.

Then on the flip side I have been in metros that went on forever but people did without cars. Just because you can do without cars doesn't mean the metro does not sprawl. The NY area isn't exactly one I would say that doesn't sprawl.
I have to agree. Walkability has nothing to do with sprawl or the lack of it.
Google it. Wikipedia claims it has to do with development that skips over empty space so as to not utilize every available piece of ground first. BTW I just love Charlottseville, such a beautiful town.
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Old 01-08-2012, 12:32 PM
 
Location: Underneath the Pecan Tree
15,989 posts, read 30,712,804 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by HtownLove View Post
even though the development isn't stretched to cover the vast land areas of the metro, the development style is still a high percentage of single family homes though.

the developed areas may be smaller, but the development style is still sprawly

Phoenix 515 sq miles at 3000ppsm
Mesa 135 sq miles at 3500 ppsm
Gilbert 75 sq miles at 2800 ppsm
Tempe 40 sq miles at 4000 ppsm
Scotsdale 135 sq miles at 1300 ppsm

the development is just as sprawly as the rest of the sunbelt
Not necessarily; once you leave the core of Phoenix metro; there is little to no development outside of it. It's confined in one area unlike Houston or Dallas where you have development sprawled all over the metropolitan area. Phoenix is a great example of what the OP is talking about.
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Old 01-08-2012, 12:36 PM
 
Location: Up on the moon laughing down on you
18,509 posts, read 28,201,873 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bryson662001 View Post
I have to agree. Walkability has nothing to do with sprawl or the lack of it.
Google it. Wikipedia claims it has to do with development that skips over empty space so as to not utilize every available piece of ground first. BTW I just love Charlottsville
I hate that Houston does that A lot.

Huge swaths of virgin land in big spots in lots of parts of the city
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Old 01-08-2012, 12:49 PM
 
1,495 posts, read 1,950,229 times
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Originally Posted by HtownLove View Post
I hate that Houston does that A lot.

Huge swaths of virgin land in big spots in lots of parts of the city
I don't know, I can see the plus side. I live in Chicago and it would be nice if we had a few more patches of "nature" in town.
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Old 01-08-2012, 01:02 PM
 
11,179 posts, read 22,403,520 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by blkgiraffe View Post
Phoenix.
LEAST sprawly, not most.....

Phoenix is not known for a place where you can walk everywhere and has a high/compact density.
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