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Old 01-16-2012, 07:30 PM
 
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someone probably already wrote these things, but more population generally means more sprawl.

if asked what are the least spread out (how far does the infrastructure and housing stretch regardless of how dense it is) for the 30 biggest metros,

Portland, OR could be #1 or way up there.
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Old 01-19-2012, 10:00 PM
 
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Originally Posted by Blue Earth View Post
Des Moines, Iowa. The farmland around the city is very fertile and very intensively farmed. Mostly corn. It's the best farmland in the world. That keeps the sprawl down. The downtown core is dense. The city of Des Moines itself is quite compact and does not annex rural areas extensively like other cities of its size usually do. City population is about 200,000, with about 500,000 in the metro. Compare this to cities like Omaha, Wichita, and Tulsa, which extensively annex rural and suburban areas to grow their population. There are some growing suburbs around the DSM metro, especially on the west and north sides, but like I said, suburban development is very cautiously approached because the land has so much value as farmland.
When the OP asked which areas have the least amount of sprawl Des Moines is the first city that came to my mind... Coming from Chicago entering the city of Des Moines, you wouldn't think the city even had a suburb. I actually would place Omaha, Wichita, and Tulsa on the same list as well as Columbus (for a large city, it actually has less sprawl. It is actually surrounded by farmland) Fort Wayne, IN, Toledo, OH, Flint, MI, Lexington, KY.... I'm guessing thats what he/she meant by less sprawly, a city where you can visually see the downtown skyline from farmland. Those the only ones I know of that Ive been to or lived in....
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Old 01-30-2012, 05:35 AM
 
Location: Phoenix
1,277 posts, read 4,158,095 times
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Originally Posted by lastonestanding View Post
When the OP asked which areas have the least amount of sprawl Des Moines is the first city that came to my mind... Coming from Chicago entering the city of Des Moines, you wouldn't think the city even had a suburb. I actually would place Omaha, Wichita, and Tulsa on the same list as well as Columbus (for a large city, it actually has less sprawl. It is actually surrounded by farmland) Fort Wayne, IN, Toledo, OH, Flint, MI, Lexington, KY.... I'm guessing thats what he/she meant by less sprawly, a city where you can visually see the downtown skyline from farmland. Those the only ones I know of that Ive been to or lived in....
You have a point about Columbus. People in the midwest tend to dog on Columbus for being a "sprawly" city. The citycore (pre WWII) is actually 60 sq miles. Then Columbus developed a "sprawly" post WWII "new city" that is about 170 sq miles. The suburbs are within this area, and only now, extending out beyond it.

Thus as a metro the cities and suburbs combined footprint is rather condensed and smaller than one would think.

This is due to the fact that Columbus annexed all townships (nearly) and then engulfed the suburbs. Not one piece of land is left unturned for development, thus forcing, more dense and less spread out suburbs/sprawl.

Going to some other metros you notice a lot of land between the central city or suburbs, in Columbus it all just continues and one can hardly tell the difference between the two. On the southwest side you can actually see downtown from what is now developing farmland (though this is one of the less developed sides of town)
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