U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > General U.S.
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 01-19-2012, 10:00 PM
 
Location: Up on the moon laughing down on you
18,509 posts, read 28,173,289 times
Reputation: 7598

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by Trimac20 View Post
Maybe it's a good thing Charleston and Savannah didn't become big cities. I like the charm they have.
so do I
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 01-19-2012, 10:49 PM
 
Location: NOVA
316 posts, read 558,393 times
Reputation: 339
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mutiny77 View Post
NYC and Boston were much more industrialized earlier in their histories and did not have their cities and economies devastated by the Civil War. Those are the main reasons why Charleston and Savannah are not major cities, which we've mentioned several times here. It has absolutely nothing to do with the mindsets of present-day citizens; it's all due to historical reasons.

I agree with you 100 percent, but current mindsets does have an effect on a community regardless of its history. If you go visit any particular city you will find that many of the inhabitants are similar. New Orleans is a prime example.

Atlanta was burned badly during the Civil War as well, so what is Charleston's and Savannah's excuse? For one thing the people in Atlanta are not stuck on the Civil War. Atlanta is now past that stage. When you go around Atlanta you will not see as many Confederate flags waving like you would in the other two cities. I am not trying to start a fire with my comment, but SAV and CHAR are still stuck in the past. Therefore human mindsets can either help or hinder any potential growth. Modern Industrialization tends not to involve cities that are stuck on history alone, especially when it is something that will only cause division amongst the people.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-19-2012, 11:48 PM
 
Location: Katy-zuela
4,852 posts, read 8,995,231 times
Reputation: 2364
Quote:
Originally Posted by annie_himself View Post
It would probably be more like DFW, with Galveston and Houston sharing the metro area.
DFW as we know it would not exist except for that hurricane. The bulk of Texas' population lived between Houston and Galveston at that time. Three-fourths of the people in Alief moved back to Ellis County (Waxahachie) after that disaster. If the capital had stayed in Houston, it would be the center of government, and Galveston would be the epicenter of commerce in the state. This might be a bigger rivalry than Houston and Dallas due to the distance!!!
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-19-2012, 11:51 PM
 
Location: Denver
14,151 posts, read 19,763,005 times
Reputation: 8803
Quote:
Originally Posted by KerrTown View Post
DFW as we know it would not exist except for that hurricane. The bulk of Texas' population lived between Houston and Galveston at that time. Three-fourths of the people in Alief moved back to Ellis County (Waxahachie) after that disaster. If the capital had stayed in Houston, it would be the center of government, and Galveston would be the epicenter of commerce in the state. This might be a bigger rivalry than Houston and Dallas due to the distance!!!
I don't know about that. Ft. Worth had a healthy economy from cattle and cotton right?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-20-2012, 09:47 AM
 
Location: Austin, Texas
3,093 posts, read 4,136,788 times
Reputation: 3117
Quote:
Originally Posted by HtownLove View Post
pfffft, I don't smoke


Then if you have heard it before, are you just being daft repeating it over and over again?

You have been told that you were incorrect more than once, how many more times do you need correcting before you to stop repeating erroneous info?

And then he gets upset that he has been corrected while admitting he has been corrected before

how about this: STOP MAKING STUPID STATEMENTS THAT HAVE BEEN SHOWN TO BE WRONG AND MAYBE PEOPLE WILL STOP CORRECTING YOU ON IT.
It's a joke! Some people really need to get a life.

Honestly, who gives a crap whether Houston or Galveston would have been bigger? I sure as hell don't. I'm actually a huge fan of Houston and would love to live there. Thank God not everybody there is as belligerent and reactionary as you were behaving in your past couple of posts.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-20-2012, 09:54 AM
 
Location: Washington D.C. By way of Texas
18,633 posts, read 27,064,736 times
Reputation: 9577
They could have done to Galveston what they did with Miami. Move Galveston to the mainland and make the island Galveston Beach. Same thing they do with Miami. If they did that, it would have been very interesting to see how that would have been built. That 1900 hurricane scared people away from that city. Sad. More charming city than Houston and I think it's urbanity on the main corridor is impressive as well.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-20-2012, 10:09 AM
 
Location: Denver
14,151 posts, read 19,763,005 times
Reputation: 8803
Quote:
Originally Posted by Spade View Post
They could have done to Galveston what they did with Miami. Move Galveston to the mainland and make the island Galveston Beach. Same thing they do with Miami. If they did that, it would have been very interesting to see how that would have been built. That 1900 hurricane scared people away from that city. Sad. More charming city than Houston and I think it's urbanity on the main corridor is impressive as well.
That would have been interesting. Downtown should have been where Texas City is now and Houston/Galveston straddling the bay. I like the nature of Galveston more compared to Houston. Would make for urban beach communities on the island and the Bolivar Peninsula.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-22-2012, 07:44 AM
 
29,944 posts, read 27,375,616 times
Reputation: 18517
Quote:
Originally Posted by cordtwo View Post
I agree with you 100 percent, but current mindsets does have an effect on a community regardless of its history. If you go visit any particular city you will find that many of the inhabitants are similar. New Orleans is a prime example.

Atlanta was burned badly during the Civil War as well, so what is Charleston's and Savannah's excuse? For one thing the people in Atlanta are not stuck on the Civil War. Atlanta is now past that stage. When you go around Atlanta you will not see as many Confederate flags waving like you would in the other two cities. I am not trying to start a fire with my comment, but SAV and CHAR are still stuck in the past. Therefore human mindsets can either help or hinder any potential growth. Modern Industrialization tends not to involve cities that are stuck on history alone, especially when it is something that will only cause division amongst the people.
It still goes back to Atlanta being industrialized much earlier due to the arrival of the railroad with an economy that wasn't anywhere near as reliant on the "peculiar institution." Southern cities like Atlanta and Charlotte that were more inland were poised to benefit from railroad connections and the industrialization spurred by them, such as textile mills. I can't speak for Savannah, but in Charleston proper most Confederate flags you will see are associated with historic sites. Its citizens are committed to preserving the character of their city, but that hardly means they are opposed to progress; they just realize that a city doesn't have to lose its identity while progressing. If you're familiar with the accolades Charleston has received over the past several years, coupled by its high growth rate and landing big economic development deals like the Boeing plant, I fail to see how you could come to the conclusion that you do.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-07-2013, 02:00 AM
 
Location: Bishkek
1,978 posts, read 1,817,568 times
Reputation: 1247
Quote:
Originally Posted by Trimac20 View Post
Maybe it's a good thing Charleston and Savannah didn't become big cities. I like the small town charm they have.
Halleluiah!
That type of life style is so much nicer. IMO And we certainly need variety in this country.
A bit of Europe in America.
But all of the above comments are true, and thank GOD.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-07-2013, 04:41 AM
 
Location: NC
1,177 posts, read 2,217,417 times
Reputation: 787
I'd rather take a rare charleston and Savannah (to have in America and visit) than a carbon copy city....they are perfect the way they are. Beside the Civil War, Charleston also had a huge earthquake that destroyed most of the city when the infrastructure wasn't strong enough then too......
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > General U.S.
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top