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Old 01-17-2012, 05:09 AM
 
16,437 posts, read 19,150,535 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by LongIslandPerson View Post
Nothing. Same houses. Same streets. Same geographic coordinates. Just people with different ancestries occupying them.


If only it were so. Unfortunately, reality demonstrates otherwise.
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Old 01-17-2012, 05:16 AM
 
Location: World
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Cost of driving to far flung suburbs has increased a lot since our parents time. Many people wish to be closer to city center, work place as well as utilise public transportation.
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Old 01-17-2012, 05:22 AM
 
Location: now nyc
1,458 posts, read 3,668,232 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bideshi View Post
If only it were so. Unfortunately, reality demonstrates otherwise.
So reality "demonstrates" that the houses will evaporate into thin air, the earth will suddenly shift changing the geographical coordinates and the streets will sink into the ground leaving no trace of their prior existence?
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Old 01-17-2012, 05:31 AM
 
16,437 posts, read 19,150,535 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by LongIslandPerson View Post
So reality "demonstrates" that the houses will evaporate into thin air, the earth will suddenly shift changing the geographical coordinates and the streets will sink into the ground leaving no trace of their prior existence?
You left out falling through the cracks of reality, and slipping into a parallel universe...
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Old 01-17-2012, 05:44 AM
 
Location: now nyc
1,458 posts, read 3,668,232 times
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Originally Posted by Bideshi View Post
You left out falling through the cracks of reality, and slipping into a parallel universe...
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Old 01-17-2012, 09:41 AM
 
Location: New York NY
4,270 posts, read 6,356,752 times
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The ultimate end of gentrification I think is that many US cities--espeically our older ones like NYC, Boston, DC, Philly, Chicago, and SF--will end up looking more and more like Paris where there is a very wealthy central city with a ring of poorer suburbs. And the poverty line will begin where the subway lines or easy mass transit runs out. People who can, will pay a premium to reclaim negihborhoods with easy access to the city center. That's already happened in NYC in many neighborhoods and will continue as the economy revives. Parts of the tough neighborhoods in the South Bronx, Washington Heights, and Bushwick, are already seeing more middle-class residents moving in, and transportation has long been a factor in the revitalization of parts of Harlem and Williamsburg. Similarly, some (but defintley not all) of the most dangerous neighborhoods in NYC are at or near the far ends of the subway lines--The Rockaways, Jamaica, Brownsville, East New York. This process of middle class folks living in the nabes with easy trasit to the city center has already happened in most of Manhattan.

I'm curious about how it wll play out in the outer boroughs. Because there is little incentive for anyone in most 'burbs to build low-cost housing I think that many of the poor will leave the area altogether and the city proper will become increasingly affluent. This will, however, take decades to play out fully, and it will be mitigated to some degree by new low-income and mixed-income housing in the outer boroughs of NYC. And because my city is so large it still may be that hosuing-wise, the outlying neighborhoods will serve the same demographic as the poorer inner ring suburbs near other cities.
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Old 01-17-2012, 10:08 AM
 
Location: now nyc
1,458 posts, read 3,668,232 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by citylove101 View Post
The ultimate end of gentrification I think is that many US cities--espeically our older ones like NYC, Boston, DC, Philly, Chicago, and SF--will end up looking more and more like Paris where there is a very wealthy central city with a ring of poorer suburbs. And the poverty line will begin where the subway lines or easy mass transit runs out. People who can, will pay a premium to reclaim negihborhoods with easy access to the city center. That's already happened in NYC in many neighborhoods and will continue as the economy revives. Parts of the tough neighborhoods in the South Bronx, Washington Heights, and Bushwick, are already seeing more middle-class residents moving in, and transportation has long been a factor in the revitalization of parts of Harlem and Williamsburg. Similarly, some (but defintley not all) of the most dangerous neighborhoods in NYC are at or near the far ends of the subway lines--The Rockaways, Jamaica, Brownsville, East New York. This process of middle class folks living in the nabes with easy trasit to the city center has already happened in most of Manhattan.

I'm curious about how it wll play out in the outer boroughs. Because there is little incentive for anyone in most 'burbs to build low-cost housing I think that many of the poor will leave the area altogether and the city proper will become increasingly affluent. This will, however, take decades to play out fully, and it will be mitigated to some degree by new low-income and mixed-income housing in the outer boroughs of NYC. And because my city is so large it still may be that hosuing-wise, the outlying neighborhoods will serve the same demographic as the poorer inner ring suburbs near other cities.
I actually think all the 5 boroughs (except for Staten Island) will become much more affluent. The poor/working class will likely be pushed into the suburbs outside of the 5 boroughs.

Most will not actually buy property since the taxes in the NYC suburban countries are sky-high (to keep out the low-income and working class) so what will probably happen is that many of the middle class suburban homeowners will start converting their detached houses into illegal two or even three-family houses and rent them out for relatively affordable prices.

Think about it, most apartments in Manhattan used to be much larger than they are but they were subdivided and turned into smaller units.
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Old 01-19-2012, 10:17 PM
 
374 posts, read 991,872 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ilovethecommunity View Post
Any neighborhoods really standing out in that downward trend?
Is it really noticeable or is it just a small change in the quality of life that residents can get use to or don't even notice?
Although its not a South Side or West Side neighborhood, Rogers Park comes to mind particularly Juneway Jungle and on the southside, Roseland aka The Wild Hundreds... The most noticeable is the south suburb of Harvey and the west suburb of Maywood.... Country Club Hills actually has a became more noticeable... And for the hispanic population, definitely Cicero.... I've actually heard there are former Cabrini Green residents living as far west as Iowa City, IA....
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Old 01-20-2012, 05:15 AM
 
Location: now nyc
1,458 posts, read 3,668,232 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lastonestanding View Post
Although its not a South Side or West Side neighborhood, Rogers Park comes to mind particularly Juneway Jungle and on the southside, Roseland aka The Wild Hundreds... The most noticeable is the south suburb of Harvey and the west suburb of Maywood.... Country Club Hills actually has a became more noticeable... And for the hispanic population, definitely Cicero.... I've actually heard there are former Cabrini Green residents living as far west as Iowa City, IA....
I heard that Country Club Hills had a rather large new luxury homes development built. I'm surprised to hear it's going downhill

Last edited by LongIslandPerson; 01-20-2012 at 05:35 AM..
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Old 02-03-2012, 06:38 PM
 
Location: Carrboro and Concord, NC
964 posts, read 2,048,314 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by j_cat View Post
Gentrification in Chicago's Near West and Near South may be contributing to problems farther west and farther south. Some of the diehard middle-class neighborhoods on the south and southwest sides are starting to go downhill, as are some west suburbs and especially south suburbs.
This has been a ferocious problem down in Charlotte, as close-in neighborhoods have spiffed up quite a bit, and the 50s-60s-era suburbs East of uptown have really, really become infested with ... issues. And those are the types of low-density suburban neighborhoods that are a bit more impossible to gentrify - once you lose them, they're gone.
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