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Old 01-08-2012, 04:47 PM
 
835 posts, read 899,151 times
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I have a few questions.

What happens after Gentrification?

Will every city be able to Gentrify?

Will there still be Minority Majority neighborhoods in cities like NY or Boston?

What happens to suburbs and other parts of the city that the poor are pushed to?

What part of your city or what suburb has been on the downturn in your state because of poor being driven in?
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Old 01-08-2012, 06:35 PM
 
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Gentrification in Chicago's Near West and Near South may be contributing to problems farther west and farther south. Some of the diehard middle-class neighborhoods on the south and southwest sides are starting to go downhill, as are some west suburbs and especially south suburbs.

Then there is the gentrification of Hispanic areas like along the Blue Line or in Pilsen, which may serve to further consolidate the Hispanic majority in neighborhoods farther in, or in suburbs like Cicero.
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Old 01-08-2012, 06:57 PM
 
835 posts, read 899,151 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by j_cat View Post
Gentrification in Chicago's Near West and Near South may be contributing to problems farther west and farther south. Some of the diehard middle-class neighborhoods on the south and southwest sides are starting to go downhill, as are some west suburbs and especially south suburbs.

Then there is the gentrification of Hispanic areas like along the Blue Line or in Pilsen, which may serve to further consolidate the Hispanic majority in neighborhoods farther in, or in suburbs like Cicero.

Any neighborhoods really standing out in that downward trend?
Is it really noticeable or is it just a small change in the quality of life that residents can get use to or don't even notice?
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Old 01-08-2012, 07:01 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ilovethecommunity View Post
Any neighborhoods really standing out in that downward trend?
Is it really noticeable or is it just a small change in the quality of life that residents can get use to or don't even notice?
I know someone whose parents moved out of one of the south suburbs because it had gone so far downhill.
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Old 01-16-2012, 07:14 PM
 
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Gentrification is a damn shame as it spreads around undesirable types of people to places where they just don't belong. Its a contributing factor along with the government insisting that every community let in section 8 residents.
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Old 01-16-2012, 07:42 PM
 
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The previous middle class suburbs become ghettos while the inner city becomes the nice area.
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Old 01-16-2012, 08:46 PM
 
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Originally Posted by cry_havoc View Post
The previous middle class suburbs become ghettos while the inner city becomes the nice area.
Exactly! Many of today's urban ghettos were middle and upper class neighborhoods 40-60-100 years ago. As those places become middle class again, they are actually "re=-gentrifying". And if social attitudes and economics were to continue as they have in this country, I wouldn't be surprised to see the gentrified places go back to low income yet again. It's a cyclical process. As for the suburbs, the post WWII burbs will continue to go "downhill" as the urban neighborhoods re-gentrify. Metro areas are organic beings, they don't stay static!
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Old 01-16-2012, 10:06 PM
 
Location: South Beach and DT Raleigh
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Gentrification is about where money goes....and when I say money, I mean people with money. If money leaves somewhere, it will decline....period. In some cases, money will return to where it previous left....but only after returning becomes too cheap to resist and there remains some sort of viable value in what was previously abandoned. This will not bode well for cookie cutter suburbia. Because, frankly, without continuous money to keep it propped up, it will lose its value quickly once abandoned. Perhaps the location alone will entice people back in the future? But, that's only after it's been bulldozed and re-imagined as something else. Heck, that's already happening. Malls, strip centers and crappy apartments are being demolished in key places around the country for the land/location alone.
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Old 01-16-2012, 10:33 PM
 
Location: now nyc
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ilovethecommunity View Post
I have a few questions.

What happens after Gentrification?
Nothing. Same houses. Same streets. Same geographic coordinates. Just people with different ancestries occupying them.

Quote:
Will every city be able to Gentrify?
Only cities with diversity in their region. Unless there is a random huge wave of migration (like the Northern migration of the early 1900's)

Quote:
Will there still be Minority Majority neighborhoods in cities like NY or Boston?
Probably. But minorities will not just disappear into thin air. A lot of the poorer ones will be pushed further into suburbs. A lot of people like to overlook the black middle class and hispanic middle class which actually do exist in large numbers so they will likely be able to live where they choose.

Quote:
What happens to suburbs and other parts of the city that the poor are pushed to?
Areas that the poor move into will obviously go downhill. But not all gentrification involves poor people moving in. In my part of the state, most gentrified areas involve influxes of middle class and upper middle class minorities moving in and i'm sure the same could be said in many other regions.

Quote:
What part of your city or what suburb has been on the downturn in your state because of poor being driven in?
Everybody has their own idea of what is "downhill" though so it's hard to give a straight answer on this.

(If you want to know the few ones in particular that do fit that category then please go to the Long Island forum or send me a private message. I don't feel right talking down to those communities on a national stage.)

But a lot of areas around where I live have diversified considerably but not gone downhill (though some ignorant and sheltered people are still in the mindset that anywhere that is less than 90% white is a ghetto). The School District that serves my community has always been very diverse [since it was created in the 1960's] and it has managed well, it has good performance and most people get along, every neighborhood that the school district serves has middle class to upper middle class median household incomes. Yet a lot like to endless whine and babble about things going "downhill", "changing", "undesirable" or whatever code words people like to use nowadays.

Last edited by LongIslandPerson; 01-16-2012 at 11:41 PM..
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Old 01-17-2012, 04:57 AM
 
6,349 posts, read 8,389,809 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rnc2mbfl View Post
Gentrification is about where money goes....and when I say money, I mean people with money. If money leaves somewhere, it will decline....period. In some cases, money will return to where it previous left....but only after returning becomes too cheap to resist and there remains some sort of viable value in what was previously abandoned. This will not bode well for cookie cutter suburbia. Because, frankly, without continuous money to keep it propped up, it will lose its value quickly once abandoned. Perhaps the location alone will entice people back in the future? But, that's only after it's been bulldozed and re-imagined as something else. Heck, that's already happening. Malls, strip centers and crappy apartments are being demolished in key places around the country for the land/location alone.
For awhile now people have actually tried to save suburbs by promoting smarter growth and creating public transportation, but the people living in the suburbs actually rejected it due to 'socialism' or 'freedom to drive a car," or some other nonsense. The real force against these things are developers who want to make a ton of money making low quality generic McMansions without regulation, or care of the problems they make. They pay politicians to get their way and politicians whip voters into a frenzy. Ironically the voters are pooping where they eat.

There is this, but suburbs have more woes. First, energy is going to continue to climb. Driving around will continue to be expensive, and inefficient suburbs will become more undesirable.

The federal, and state governments, are becoming hostile to building new infrastructure and maintaining old infrastructure. Congestion will continue to get worse, even as people flee the suburbs.

Finally, they are not desirable. There is a generation of kids who grew up in boring McHouses coming off age who dont want to live the same miserable way their parents did. They saw their parents go crazy from sitting in traffic, remember not knowing any of their neighbors, saw the soul crushing lifelessness of suburbs, and remember the boredom.

People counter, "when they have kids they will need to move for a better school district." These people tend to be older and forget that younger people dont think like them. Instead of running from a problem and hiding from it in a McMansion and watching Jersey Shore to forget their problems younger people are trying to make the world a better place. That means improving things, something lost on the selfish suburban attitude.

Finally, City schools will improve as cities become wealthy from gentrification, and suburban schools will become the new inner city public schools.
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