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Old 01-20-2012, 11:41 AM
 
Location: Ohio, USA
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Any state that borders Canada has the most in common with the part of Canada it borders.
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Old 01-23-2012, 10:22 PM
 
Location: Sault Ste. Marie, MI
302 posts, read 591,820 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jtur88 View Post


There is no "relative ease in crossing the border" anymore. When I arrived in China, I got through customs and immigration faster and with less fuss than at Sault Ste. Marie. Americans simply never go to Canada anymore, nor vice versa, unless there is a compelling need or if it's going to be a trip of several days.
I concur that many Americans living on the Canadian border don't pass into Canada as often as they used to, based on personal experience. At least in the Sault area, though, I'd disagree that Americans and especially Canadians "never" visit the other country. I've worked retail on and off in Sault Ste. Marie, Michigan for years, and Canadians from Sault Ontario are a big part of the customer base, maybe even a majority. Picking up half empty Tim Horton cups was part of my nightly routine.
At least on the US side, being a border town is part of our identity; I remember singing "Oh Canada" after the US National anthem in school. I know many Canadians who live and or work on the US side of the river (I know of no Americans on the Canadian side, though I personally don't spend all that much time there).
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Old 01-23-2012, 10:58 PM
 
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I'd agree with others who feel that the connectedness has actually been declining a bit over time.

I remember reading articles back in the late 1990's about tightened border security, and how towns sitting across from each other on the Montana-North Dakota/Saskatchewan-Manitoba border were having more and more trouble doing simple things like playing one another in high school sports games - shared computerized databases meant that people with DUII trouble from 25 years ago were being turned back and told to seek visas from the regional consulate; longtime border guards who knew people's faces were being rotated out with brusque agents unhappy with their rural postings; hours were trimmed at some posts (making it impossible to hold games in the evening); and the physical border itself was fortified with acoustic monitoring devices, fencing, and ditches, and unauthorized crossers were arrested and held in detention cells rather than merely sent back (no more crossing over on foot to your buddy's house across the field for get-togethers - you'd have to drive several miles to the crossing then several miles back, even though your houses are line-of-sight from one another).

It's hard to maintain as much "connectedness" when the border is treated as a fortified post where a slip-up could get you incarcerated. The opposite model would be something like the French-Belgian border, where numerous restaurants and pubs intentionally build over the boundary line as an amusement for tourists, who can cross an international border with drinks in their hands.

There is still one somewhat famous place along the US-Canada border where something like that is kind of the case - Derby Line, Vermont and Stanstead, Quebec. But even there, things have tightened up over the years.
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Old 01-24-2012, 12:52 AM
 
3,285 posts, read 5,432,089 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jtur88 View Post
In terms of personal travel, the Germans and the French are more willing to casually visit each other's country, than the Americans and Canadians, and they can do so with far less indignity and trepidation inflicted upon them. Compared to the average border crossing in the world, the US and Canada are behaving like lifelong enemies.
Two words: European Union.
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Old 01-24-2012, 02:38 AM
 
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Originally Posted by f1000 View Post
Ya I dont see too much deeper connection between the Pacific NW and Canada besides some superficial weekend "road trips", and even then it is so surprising how many ppl in Seattle have NOT been to Canada
To me, its odd that you say this because growing up, it was basically a rite of passage that we go to BC on our 19th birthday. I grew up with many peers who have visited the Capilano bridge, so obviously there's good number of Seattleites visiting (visited) BC. But then Seattle does have a lot of transplants and who knows what they've done.


Quote:
Originally Posted by f1000 View Post
5) dont they say "eh" in the Upper Midwest, and some areas have "Canadian raising" in speech whereas it is non-existent in the Pacific NW
Do BC folks say "Eh"? I don't think I've ever heard one of them say it.
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Old 01-24-2012, 10:11 AM
 
Location: MN
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Keep your sticks on the ice boys!

Minnesota has more in common with Ontario and Manitoba than Texas or Florida.
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Old 01-24-2012, 03:06 PM
 
Location: Seattle, WA
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Inkpoe View Post
To me, its odd that you say this because growing up, it was basically a rite of passage that we go to BC on our 19th birthday. I grew up with many peers who have visited the Capilano bridge, so obviously there's good number of Seattleites visiting (visited) BC. But then Seattle does have a lot of transplants and who knows what they've done.




Do BC folks say "Eh"? I don't think I've ever heard one of them say it.

Its odd I've had the opposite experience accent-wise. Growing up in the midwest and visiting places like Toronto I always thought that Canadian's didn't have any accents. Now having lived out in Seattle for many years, I find the Canadian accent much more noticeable in B.C. For me one of the markers is how you pronounce out.
Ben
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Old 01-24-2012, 03:20 PM
 
Location: The canyon (with my pistols and knife)
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I'd say the part of the United States with the strongest ties to Canada is Arkansas.
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Old 01-24-2012, 05:22 PM
 
Location: On the Great South Bay
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Gnutella View Post
I'd say the part of the United States with the strongest ties to Canada is Arkansas.
I could be wrong but I think I read somewhere that Walmart is giving the Hudson Bay Company alot of competition.
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Old 01-24-2012, 05:43 PM
 
605 posts, read 1,235,188 times
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Originally Posted by 18Montclair View Post
The Pacific Northwest and Alaska.
Agreed easily the Pacific Northwest and Alaska. For starters Seattle is the largest American city literally a stones throw from Canada (2 hours from the border). I can't think of any other American city (of similar size and influence) that even comes close.

In fact seattle is at a higher lattitude than most of the eastern Canadian cities.
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