U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > General U.S.
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 01-15-2012, 08:34 AM
 
413 posts, read 652,988 times
Reputation: 697

Advertisements

For awhile now, I have been looking for a data source that shows purchasing power by metro area. Cost of living, and per capita income alone do not provide a sense of the average resident's purchasing power. They need to be combined. I think it's possible that the average resident of a high income, high COL metro area could have more purchasing power than the average resident of a very low income, low COL city. If I could find this data, we would have a ranking of MSA's by average purchasing power. That would be really interesting and really useful.

The nearest thing I can find are the "See the equivalent salary for a specific job in two different cities" websites or Moderator cut: link removed, linking to competitor sites is not allowed but who knows where that data comes from or when it was last updated.

The Census Bureau's website has all sorts of data but it is difficult for me to find what I'm looking for on American Fact Finder, their data repository.

I have done a lot of Google searching for terms like "real per capita income", "adjusted per capita income", and "purchasing power by metro area" and have come up empty.

Does anyone out there know if data like this exists? I would appreciate any insights that you can give. Thank you.

Last edited by Yac; 01-24-2012 at 04:46 AM..
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 01-15-2012, 01:26 PM
 
Location: Zurich, Switzerland/ Piedmont, CA
32,372 posts, read 55,173,351 times
Reputation: 15449
Thank you for asking. This is a great question.

Denver, Minneapolis, St Louis and Pittsburgh appear to do exceptionally well in this regard.

Among the largest Metro Areas(MSAs), DC and SF are still the top 2 even after the comparative cost of living adjustment.

On the other hand, NY and San Jose seem to take huge dives.



The Link:
Regional Exchange Rates: The Cost of Living in US Metropolitan Areas | Newgeography.com


*The (2009)data used for this report is the latest per capita income available by the US Commerce Department and can be accessed directly as bea.gov

Last edited by 18Montclair; 01-15-2012 at 01:39 PM..
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-15-2012, 03:23 PM
 
56,618 posts, read 80,930,134 times
Reputation: 12508
You might be able to find something here: BEA Regional Economic Accounts
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-15-2012, 06:03 PM
 
Location: IN
20,849 posts, read 35,958,846 times
Reputation: 13297
Quote:
Originally Posted by 18Montclair View Post
Thank you for asking. This is a great question.

Denver, Minneapolis, St Louis and Pittsburgh appear to do exceptionally well in this regard.

Among the largest Metro Areas(MSAs), DC and SF are still the top 2 even after the comparative cost of living adjustment.

On the other hand, NY and San Jose seem to take huge dives.



The Link:
Regional Exchange Rates: The Cost of Living in US Metropolitan Areas | Newgeography.com


*The (2009)data used for this report is the latest per capita income available by the US Commerce Department and can be accessed directly as bea.gov
It doesn't really surprise me that STL and KC rank the highest in income adjusted for cost of living. That is one of the few advantages that I like about KC when I lived there.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-05-2012, 08:31 AM
 
75 posts, read 83,664 times
Reputation: 81
The information is misleading because it includes the people who make lots of money in places like Washington DC which gives the impression that the average middle class person is doing well in this high cost metro area.

A better chart would be a description of how people in typical jobs, like teachers, barbers, administrative assistants, do in each place in comparison to the cost of living. Would a teacher making $36K in Atlanta have more money left over after paying expenses than a typical teacher making $50K in Washington DC?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-05-2012, 03:27 PM
 
21,193 posts, read 30,379,606 times
Reputation: 19627
Quote:
Originally Posted by regular folk View Post
The information is misleading because it includes the people who make lots of money in places like Washington DC which gives the impression that the average middle class person is doing well in this high cost metro area.

A better chart would be a description of how people in typical jobs, like teachers, barbers, administrative assistants, do in each place in comparison to the cost of living. Would a teacher making $36K in Atlanta have more money left over after paying expenses than a typical teacher making $50K in Washington DC?
It's not misleading information. What many people fail to grasp is that salaries remain proportional. Don't you suppose there would be some kind of crisis if teachers, barbers and administrative assistants (and others) couldn't afford to live in DC?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-05-2012, 03:28 PM
 
21,193 posts, read 30,379,606 times
Reputation: 19627
Quote:
Originally Posted by 18Montclair View Post
Thank you for asking. This is a great question.

Denver, Minneapolis, St Louis and Pittsburgh appear to do exceptionally well in this regard.

Among the largest Metro Areas(MSAs), DC and SF are still the top 2 even after the comparative cost of living adjustment.

On the other hand, NY and San Jose seem to take huge dives.



The Link:
Regional Exchange Rates: The Cost of Living in US Metropolitan Areas | Newgeography.com


*The (2009)data used for this report is the latest per capita income available by the US Commerce Department and can be accessed directly as bea.gov
Excellent data and it reinforces why the DC area is a great option for those looking for work (with a 5.7% unemployment rate) if one can get past the fallacy that it's unaffordable.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-05-2012, 04:28 PM
 
Location: Indianapolis
3,895 posts, read 4,570,760 times
Reputation: 957
Quote:
Originally Posted by kyle19125 View Post
Excellent data and it reinforces why the DC area is a great option for those looking for work (with a 5.7% unemployment rate) if one can get past the fallacy that it's unaffordable.
And the Unstable Growth/Reliance on the government for jobs/heavy traffic/high cost of living and taxes. Plus way to many people.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-08-2012, 11:41 PM
 
5,553 posts, read 6,983,406 times
Reputation: 2806
Quote:
Originally Posted by kyle19125 View Post
It's not misleading information. What many people fail to grasp is that salaries remain proportional. Don't you suppose there would be some kind of crisis if teachers, barbers and administrative assistants (and others) couldn't afford to live in DC?

Salaries do NOT remain proportional to COL. Why do you think so many recent college grads move out of California after only a few years there? Reason - they cannot afford to keep living there. Most salaries are national, meaning you get paid the same in a low COL area as in a high COL. An engineer in Los Angeles does not get paid over twice what the same engineer would be paid in Cincinnati, despite the huge COL difference.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-09-2012, 08:34 AM
 
21,193 posts, read 30,379,606 times
Reputation: 19627
Quote:
Originally Posted by Broadrippleguy View Post
And the Unstable Growth/Reliance on the government for jobs/heavy traffic/high cost of living and taxes. Plus way to many people.
Umm, the federal government and related industries are hardly unstable. Two key fundamentals to economic stability for a city are government and education. If one has noticed, both types of cities (state capitals and college towns) have consistently held unemployment down throughout the recession. In terms of "way too many people", welcome to the big city...
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > General U.S.
Similar Threads
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top