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View Poll Results: Are you a fan of new architecture?
Yes 12 36.36%
No 21 63.64%
Voters: 33. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 01-16-2012, 11:13 AM
 
Location: MN
378 posts, read 604,185 times
Reputation: 264

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Quote:
Originally Posted by annie_himself View Post
What 1800s era home is ugly? All of these McMansions look alike with cheap materials and little character. You mean suburban subdivisions?
What is "character" in this context?
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Old 01-16-2012, 11:34 AM
 
Location: Denver
14,157 posts, read 19,801,033 times
Reputation: 8810
Quote:
Originally Posted by 2018 View Post
What is "character" in this context?
I'd look like an idiot trying to put it into words, honestly. It's just a bad feeling in most subdivisions when you walk outside and see 6 houses that can look directly in your backyard, no one outside, and 3 out of 7 houses are identical, even the same color.
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Old 01-16-2012, 11:36 AM
 
Location: MN
378 posts, read 604,185 times
Reputation: 264
Quote:
Originally Posted by annie_himself View Post
I'd look like an idiot trying to put it into words, honestly. It's just a bad feeling in most subdivisions when you walk outside and see 6 houses that can look directly in your backyard.
Agreed. That's a function of small lot size, not age.
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Old 01-16-2012, 11:43 AM
 
Location: Vancouver, Canada
1,255 posts, read 2,115,418 times
Reputation: 787
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lamplight View Post
I'm definitely an Art Nouveau fan, although some of the architecture I've seen is a bit too far over-the-top for my taste. With Art Deco, I tend to either love it or despise it.
Art Deco makes me feel conflicted. I think I'd have liked it more if I'd been born a hundred years ago.

One art deco building in an area of older buildings can look interesting, edgy, and sleek. One art deco building in a sea of mid- to late-twentieth century minimalism can fail to have much eye-catching power.

I like the Miami Beach Art Deco district because it fits the theme and mood of the place exactly.

As for Nouveau, I lean more to Horta's sinuous designs than to the blockier, more literally organic Gaudi works.
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Old 01-16-2012, 11:55 AM
 
Location: Denver
14,157 posts, read 19,801,033 times
Reputation: 8810
Quote:
Originally Posted by 2018 View Post
Agreed. That's a function of small lot size, not age.
Yet trees are hardly a part of newer subdivisions, while in older ones they have had time to grow.
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Old 01-16-2012, 01:06 PM
Status: "Greenville Works" (set 2 days ago)
 
3,288 posts, read 5,442,620 times
Reputation: 1069
Quote:
Originally Posted by annie_himself View Post
I'd look like an idiot trying to put it into words, honestly. It's just a bad feeling in most subdivisions when you walk outside and see 6 houses that can look directly in your backyard, no one outside, and 3 out of 7 houses are identical, even the same color.
Exactly if you drive into modern neighborhoods you don't see as much character as before. The first four houses are ok, then you start realizing that all the houses are the same.


Btw: I do like the Comcast center, it's actually nice. But I'm just wondering how long will this "glass" phase last? It seems like every tower being built now has a glass facade.
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Old 01-16-2012, 01:17 PM
 
Location: Chicago (from pittsburgh)
3,700 posts, read 4,539,441 times
Reputation: 2911
Quote:
Originally Posted by jm02 View Post
I can't answer this poll. I am a fan of good architecture, regardless of when it was built.
Exactly.Best answer.

Prime examples

Wrigley-Trump.....Old-New -- Chicago | Flickr - Photo Sharing! (http://www.flickr.com/photos/dennym/3955999653/ - broken link)

The beautiful Wrigley Building a few short steps from the impressive Trump Hotel and Tower
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Old 01-16-2012, 01:18 PM
 
Location: Bellingham, WA
9,745 posts, read 14,207,442 times
Reputation: 14796
Quote:
Originally Posted by CairoCanadian View Post
Art Deco makes me feel conflicted. I think I'd have liked it more if I'd been born a hundred years ago.

One art deco building in an area of older buildings can look interesting, edgy, and sleek. One art deco building in a sea of mid- to late-twentieth century minimalism can fail to have much eye-catching power.

I like the Miami Beach Art Deco district because it fits the theme and mood of the place exactly.
I think "conflicted" is a good word for it. I can't pretend to be well-versed in architecture, I just know that I like certain things, and that includes some Art Deco architecture but certainly not all. When it comes to Art Deco I think I'm more fond of the style in prints, such as posters and that sort of thing, and to some extent, furniture.

Quote:
Originally Posted by CairoCanadian View Post
As for Nouveau, I lean more to Horta's sinuous designs than to the blockier, more literally organic Gaudi works.
I'm definitely in full agreement with you here.
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Old 01-16-2012, 05:59 PM
 
Location: Milwaukee
915 posts, read 1,664,326 times
Reputation: 1550
I love pre WWII classic brick/stone ornate buildings with nice proportions, details and high quality materials. The problem IMO deals with costs. To build a building such as the Woolworth building in NYC would be cost prohibitive due to the expense of skilled labor and materials. A modern glass skyscraper, big box store or modern apartment complex is cheap compared to a building built in the golden age of the 1920's.

I like some new buildings, but many look cheap and are for the most part disposable with a 35 year life span. The early part of the 20th century consisted of the perfect conditions for classic architecture. Low labor cost, abundant labor, wealth, abundant high quality materials, advances in technology in construction, desire for classic design etc. Now we are not so fortunate and do not meet all the above mentioned requirements.

Hopefully society will continue to make an all effort to perverse classic architecture, because once it is gone it isn't coming back. Cheap imitations don't cut it. Some MLB stadiums have successfully brought back classic architecture, but this is the exception and not the norm.
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Old 01-16-2012, 07:19 PM
Status: "Greenville Works" (set 2 days ago)
 
3,288 posts, read 5,442,620 times
Reputation: 1069
Agreed. The Major leagues have definitely done well with building retro-stadiums.

Also if these major companies want to show there power by building tall, iconic skyscrapers then they should build it with quality.
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