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View Poll Results: Are you a fan of new architecture?
Yes 12 36.36%
No 21 63.64%
Voters: 33. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 01-16-2012, 07:51 PM
 
Location: Cleveland bound with MPLS in the rear-view
5,530 posts, read 10,140,743 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jerriblank View Post
You're not going to make a lot of friends here. Also in a hundred years or so I bet people will be praising and trying to protect the old McMansion homes. So it is all relavent.
They will all fall to pieces anyways, since they are cheaply built and mass-produced. THis is why 1800's homes are popular.....because they were built to last!
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Old 01-16-2012, 11:15 PM
 
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Agreed. McMansions will decline soon enough as demand climbs in cities.
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Old 01-17-2012, 08:17 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BMOREBOY View Post
Agreed. McMansions will decline soon enough as demand climbs in cities.
McMansions will never decline. As long as there is a population of children and families, there will be McMansions. Keep dreaming.
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Old 01-17-2012, 10:00 AM
 
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I can see where your coming from but i think there will be a transition of people living in the sububs to cities. With that said, the low-income people would begin living in suburbs. (its already starting to happen in a few cities).
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Old 01-17-2012, 07:05 PM
 
Location: East of the Sun, West of the Moon
15,523 posts, read 17,745,743 times
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Some people like Filet Mignon, others like a Big Mac, I am not going to criticize tastes, but whereas the faults of older building are due to a lack of the modern materials we have today, the faults of McMansions lay in the lack of respect for the art and craft of building and respect for those who will inhabit the lookalike, fake-facade stick house when they move on to the next tract.
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Old 01-17-2012, 07:19 PM
 
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Originally Posted by annie_himself View Post
It's just a bad feeling in most subdivisions when you walk outside and see 6 houses that can look directly in your backyard...
I'm not such a big fan of the suburbs myself, but I can't say I've ever understood this particular (frequently heard) complaint of "houses right next to each other". Suddenly density is a bad thing, just because it's in a suburban context?
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Old 01-17-2012, 07:21 PM
 
6,349 posts, read 8,394,085 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BMOREBOY View Post
Just one question; what happened to the "quality" look of American architecture?

The type of architecture that actually had craft in it, it seems like everywhere I go the new buildings look cheaply built. I'm a fan of progression in architecture but the buildings, home, etc being built now is crappy.

You dont see too much craft within these "McMansions", new office buildings, etc.

Am I the only one that feels this way?

I was in D.C. earlier this month and saw plenty of new construction going on but it all looked tacky to me. It's not just D.C. though, its everywhere. These new buildings aren't built to withstand the test of time, I can tell you that.
There was a time when Americans took pride in their buildings, whether they were rich or poor. The houses were beautiful and strong. You are right new construction is overwhelmingly cheap. The skilled craftsmen who made each building unique are replaced by Home Depot and standardization. Even a building that looks good on the outside is probably built cheaply on the inside. The buildings look too clean and artificial. American architecture is in a sad state, probably due to the decline in skilled workers.
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Old 01-17-2012, 07:21 PM
 
1,495 posts, read 1,948,249 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ABQConvict View Post
Some people like Filet Mignon, others like a Big Mac, I am not going to criticize tastes, but whereas the faults of older building are due to a lack of the modern materials we have today, the faults of McMansions lay in the lack of respect for the art and craft of building and respect for those who will inhabit the lookalike, fake-facade stick house when they move on to the next tract.
I don't know, I think it's like with music or anything else: the bad old buildings have crumbled or been demolished, forgotten one way or another, whereas the bad new buildings are still right in front of us, so we perceive a "decline" that's not necessarily real.
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Old 01-17-2012, 07:22 PM
 
6,349 posts, read 8,394,085 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BMOREBOY View Post
I can see where your coming from but i think there will be a transition of people living in the sububs to cities. With that said, the low-income people would begin living in suburbs. (its already starting to happen in a few cities).
It is happening. Soon McMansions will be inhabited by large families and become places associated with poverty. While the middle and upper classes flee to the new cities. Hopefully this will revive American architecture.
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Old 01-17-2012, 07:43 PM
 
3,285 posts, read 5,434,497 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cry_havoc View Post
It is happening. Soon McMansions will be inhabited by large families and become places associated with poverty. While the middle and upper classes flee to the new cities. Hopefully this will revive American architecture.
Hopefully it will. In Baltimore we are known for our row houses, but a huge amount of them are dilapidated. If and when the middle & upper class begin moving back into the city, they'll either demolish the existing row houses for new row houses (hopefully made of quality material, with much craft) or either renovate the existing town house. (which I would prefer) So in a sense there would be a revival.

With that said, I'm stating again that I do like progression in architecture. But what were seeing in modern day architecture is retrogression. It's just the art in homes/offices/shopping centers/etc is gone. It's all about mass-production which disgusts me. I can drive through the suburbs of Raleigh (or any city for that matter, but I'm using Raleigh because I was there earlier today) and see the same neighborhood over and over again (not house, but the entire neighborhood is the same as another, just a different layout), same goes for shopping centers. Shopping centers will have the same exact tenant list, as one say a mile down the street.
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