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View Poll Results: Are you a fan of new architecture?
Yes 12 36.36%
No 21 63.64%
Voters: 33. You may not vote on this poll

 
 
Old 01-17-2012, 08:01 PM
 
6,349 posts, read 8,392,028 times
Reputation: 1768

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Quote:
Originally Posted by BMOREBOY View Post
Hopefully it will. In Baltimore we are known for our row houses, but a huge amount of them are dilapidated. If and when the middle & upper class begin moving back into the city, they'll either demolish the existing row houses for new row houses (hopefully made of quality material, with much craft) or either renovate the existing town house. (which I would prefer) So in a sense there would be a revival.

With that said, I'm stating again that I do like progression in architecture. But what were seeing in modern day architecture is retrogression. It's just the art in homes/offices/shopping centers/etc is gone. It's all about mass-production which disgusts me. I can drive through the suburbs of Raleigh (or any city for that matter, but I'm using Raleigh because I was there earlier today) and see the same neighborhood over and over again (not house, but the entire neighborhood is the same as another, just a different layout), same goes for shopping centers. Shopping centers will have the same exact tenant list, as one say a mile down the street.
The middle class is moving back and the poor are moving to suburbs. The process started in some cities, like NYC, in the 80s but caught on nationwide during the crash.

The surbanization of America led to a decline in the architecture of the US. It also led to a decline in the character of Americans and the economy, but that is a different story. If you want to see everything wrong with this country go to a generic sprawly suburb.

It is nice to know they are dying a slow painful death.
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Old 01-17-2012, 08:09 PM
 
1,495 posts, read 1,947,636 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cry_havoc View Post
It is nice to know they are dying a slow painful death.
Seriously? It's comments like this that give city people a bad name.
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Old 01-17-2012, 08:13 PM
 
6,349 posts, read 8,392,028 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by j_cat View Post
Seriously? It's comments like this that give city people a bad name.
The truth hurts.

Denial wont change anything, nor will getting angry at the messenger.
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Old 01-17-2012, 08:22 PM
 
1,495 posts, read 1,947,636 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cry_havoc View Post
The truth hurts.

Denial wont change anything, nor will getting angry at the messenger.
First of all, I too am a city person. I'm not the one getting "angry".

But second, these forecasts of widespread suburban decline are still a bit premature, and attitudes like the one you display here are certainly not helping the "city" cause.
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Old 01-17-2012, 08:27 PM
 
6,349 posts, read 8,392,028 times
Reputation: 1768
Quote:
Originally Posted by j_cat View Post
First of all, I too am a city person. I'm not the one getting "angry".

But second, these forecasts of widespread suburban decline are still a bit premature, and attitudes like the one you display here are certainly not helping the "city" cause.
Just because you are in a city doesnt mean you are not in denial. The suburbs are on the decline. I am sorry but there is no way to sugarcoat it or make it PC. Sometimes you just have to break the news to people.

Also, the city cause doesnt need my help. Natural circumstances are leading to their growth. I would love to take credit for the rebirth of the city, but to be fair my impact is extremely negligible.
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Old 01-17-2012, 08:30 PM
 
1,495 posts, read 1,947,636 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cry_havoc View Post
Just because you are in a city doesnt mean you are not in denial.
Fair point, but the fact is, I simply have no reason or motive to be in denial on this point. Analyze someone else, Freud.
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Old 01-17-2012, 08:53 PM
 
6,349 posts, read 8,392,028 times
Reputation: 1768
Quote:
Originally Posted by j_cat View Post
Fair point, but the fact is, I simply have no reason or motive to be in denial on this point. Analyze someone else, Freud.
I dont know what your motivations, assuming you have them. They could be present at a subconscious level that even you are unaware of. It also could be a case of your knowledge on the situation being inadequate, or living in the city you could be unaware of the plight of the suburbs. Over the internet it is very hard to get to the truth of the matter, but I will give you the benefit of the doubt.
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Old 01-19-2012, 03:10 PM
 
3,285 posts, read 5,433,764 times
Reputation: 1064
Clyfford Still Museum - Cultural Projects, Daylighting, Concrete, Formwork - Architect Magazine
Clyfford Still Museum-Denver

I'm really fascinated in the design of that building; since I am a huge fan of squares this appeals to me.
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Old 01-19-2012, 04:27 PM
 
Location: Philadelphia, PA
1,565 posts, read 2,568,344 times
Reputation: 1655
I see very, very few modern buildings that get it completely right. There's almost always something wrong with them - cheap materials, awkward placement, utilitarian functions on ugly full display, too auto centric, lack of grace and beauty, etc. Even the "good ones" invariably end up having some sort of unsightly flaw.
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Old 01-19-2012, 04:34 PM
 
Location: under a rock
1,494 posts, read 1,451,144 times
Reputation: 1019
Quote:
Originally Posted by cry_havoc View Post
The middle class is moving back and the poor are moving to suburbs. The process started in some cities, like NYC, in the 80s but caught on nationwide during the crash.

The surbanization of America led to a decline in the architecture of the US. It also led to a decline in the character of Americans and the economy, but that is a different story. If you want to see everything wrong with this country go to a generic sprawly suburb.

It is nice to know they are dying a slow painful death.
That's the thing. The poor and new immigrants are moving(or being driven due to $$$ development) to the suburbs, which in turn, will make the suburbs more characterful, gritty, and diverse...rendering the cities, bland and characterless, like the suburbs, the ex-suburbanites, left. Funny, isn't it? But as for architecture...it all depends on the design and it's functionality, for me, that is.
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