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Old 01-19-2012, 06:18 PM
 
Location: New Orleans
2,311 posts, read 4,251,498 times
Reputation: 1436

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Colts View Post
It's not up to us to decide.

It's what they say they are. Period.
I would agree with that assertion 90% of the time, but in New Orleans native generally means "born and raised", though I suppose if you move here as a small child you could still be considered a "native". My own mother moved here when she was 15, so I've lived here for less years but I'm a native, yet she's a "local", and I don't think she really considers herself a native. My dad will tell you that he's a native of Mississippi, where he was born and raised; he moved here in his early 20's. It might be instructive to mention "native" comes from the word for "birth" ( think pre-natal care).
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Old 01-19-2012, 07:56 PM
 
115 posts, read 296,863 times
Reputation: 113
" In response to the OP's hypothetical situation about the SC/NY guy: While I wouldn't call him a Yankee transplant, but he's still a transplant that just happens to have deep family roots in SC. Just because someone visits a place a lot doesn't necessarily mean they're part of that area's social fabric. So in response to A and B... no. Either they're native (born/bred/raised) or transplants. Usually with transplants, once they've been in the area long enough they become "long (term/time) residents".

A "cultural Hybrid"... just me personally, I'd rather reserve that for someone who has cross National lines (American who spent many summers in Japan and eventually moves there as an adult for example)."

Hmm, interesting.

Well, might the NYC/SC guy as a result of being raised by SC father and spending summers there perhaps have some genuine South Carolinaness on a psychological level that virtually no normal transplant would have, in addition to the slight hint in his accent. Does on some level the fact that his father was born and raised there and raised him make him more oganically on a psychological level and heritage level a Carolinian?

Okay, let me explain how he might feel.

Suppose, he decides, him being someone who has his first birthday party there, first girfriend under a BBQ pit there during the summer to move to what he knows is truy in his heart his second home when he completes law school. At the same time some New York City Hedge Fund guys, desperate housewives, and real estate sharks decide to buy some beachfront property in his "summer" hometown, well because it is cheap. These New York City hedge fund guys are completely NYC in culture, have no ties to the area and have never seen South Carolina until they bought the real estate. They are purebred yuppies. Some townspeople go into an uproar stating "No more transplants from New York City" Can you understand why the NYC/SC guy would hate being lumped together with the other New York City transplants and why he might insist that despite technically being a New York Transplant that he is at least one percent more native then the average New York City transplant since he is based on his life history moving to one of his semi-hometowns.

Thanks
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Old 01-19-2012, 08:20 PM
 
Location: Guangzhou, China
9,792 posts, read 13,406,061 times
Reputation: 11315
I think it can get complicated, which I guess makes a "gray area."

I was born in Seattle and lived there the first few years of my life. Then, we moved to CT. Then, to MA, then to NH... at 7, we moved back to WA. Lived in Lynwood, Mill Creek, Seattle, and Auburn. Then moved to Boston at 13. I moved to CA at 18, and have lived in LA, SF, NYC, and Seattle since then.

I don't really find myself a "native" of anywhere, as people often term it; I took my first breath in Seattle, but am the anti-Seattle in terms of personality... way too aggressive and outgoing for the place. And yet, I was born in a hospital in North Seattle that was across the street from where my WW1 veteran and native Washingtonian great-grandpa was buried. My other great-grandpa started the first AA chapter in WA, and his funeral was attended by thousands, including some local TV and music personalities - he's buried next to Jimi Hendrix. How's that for some local roots?

And yet, I generally consider myself a Bostonian, and friends of mine who are native Bostonians or native Californians consider me as such... even though at this point, I've lived in CA longer than MA (7 MA vs. 9 CA).

At the end of the day, for those of us who move around a lot as kids, we'll be in places where we do fit in, or we don't fit in. We'll take on different traits and opinions and worldviews according to what goes on around us, and ultimately, we'll decide "what" we are.
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Old 01-19-2012, 08:24 PM
 
Location: Washington D.C. By way of Texas
18,679 posts, read 27,167,407 times
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I generally agree with what Colts said. However, I feel if you have been there for a while and you spent a great portion of your time there, I think you can be called a native.
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Old 01-19-2012, 10:39 PM
 
7,386 posts, read 13,280,630 times
Reputation: 9006
Quote:
Originally Posted by stevechang103 View Post
Well, might the NYC/SC guy as a result of being raised by SC father and spending summers there perhaps have some genuine South Carolinaness on a psychological level that virtually no normal transplant would have, in addition to the slight hint in his accent. Does on some level the fact that his father was born and raised there and raised him make him more oganically on a psychological level and heritage level a Carolinian?

Okay, let me explain how he might feel.

Suppose, he decides, him being someone who has his first birthday party there, first girfriend under a BBQ pit there during the summer to move to what he knows is truy in his heart his second home when he completes law school. At the same time some New York City Hedge Fund guys, desperate housewives, and real estate sharks decide to buy some beachfront property in his "summer" hometown, well because it is cheap. These New York City hedge fund guys are completely NYC in culture, have no ties to the area and have never seen South Carolina until they bought the real estate. They are purebred yuppies. Some townspeople go into an uproar stating "No more transplants from New York City" Can you understand why the NYC/SC guy would hate being lumped together with the other New York City transplants and why he might insist that despite technically being a New York Transplant that he is at least one percent more native then the average New York City transplant since he is based on his life history moving to one of his semi-hometowns.

Thanks
Honestly... I'm wary about this whole "feel" thing... I mean: You have white guys who listen to Reggae, love the culture and feel they're Jamaican. Are they Jamaican? No, they're not.

If the guy feels that he's "organically on a psychological level and heritage level a Carolinian", then obviously he got deep family roots. I'm assuming that he wouldn't act like those NYC transplants and he got people/locals who know him and wouldn't treat him like that. If he really was part of the social fabric-- then he wouldn't worry about that whole Anti-NYC transplant issue. Because ultimately it wouldn't adversely affect him the way it would those Yankee transplants, he probably would be playfully teased about it though.

Transplant/Native are words that are clearly defined. I don't think there are gray areas, it has nothing to do with how you feel, but rather where you've been located at some point in your lifetime.

The bigger question should've been "When do you become a 'local'?"
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Old 01-20-2012, 12:44 AM
 
7,386 posts, read 13,280,630 times
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P.S. I'm not against the NYC guy saying he's a Carolinian. Its just there's a big difference between someone who is a Carolinian and someone who is a Carolinian Native. Technically speaking (not that anyone actually cares), NYC guy isn't a Carolinian Native.
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Old 01-20-2012, 09:36 AM
 
Location: New York NY
4,285 posts, read 6,383,442 times
Reputation: 9119
Grey areas abound. Most people who know me think of me as a native New Yorker. I go out of town and strangers I speak with immediately peg me as an Easterner, and many peg me right away as a New Yorker. I was born here. I did my earliest school years here. But here's the grey area--my family moved from city when I was young and I didn't get back until I finished school. With two short exceptions I've lived on the isle of Manhattan ever since. Am I a born and raised New Yorker? No. I never say that about myself. Am I a native New Yorker? Yes. I was born here, have lived here almost all of my life at this point, and like I say, I'm pegged as a New Yorker by everybody except those who knew me as a kid in the 'burb I was desperate to escape from.
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Old Yesterday, 11:38 PM
 
1 posts
Reputation: 10
I am a Military baby my self. I was born on Fort Carson Military Base in Colorado, but was reared, raised and still resign in Atlanta Georgia. My wife and kids were born and raised in Atlanta Georgia. I am 31but have been living in Metro Atl since I was 8. Before I settled in Atlanta, we moved alot due to the military. From a baby to 8. We stayed in Colorado springs, Denver, Germany and somewhere else. I donít remember because I was too young. When we settled in Atlanta, We settled for good and I never stayed anywhere else outside of Georgia. I feel like I can call myself an Atlanta Native because Iíve basically been here all my life. From a boy to man and still here, raising my family, but others who are born & raised here will beg the differ, people feel if youíre not from there by birth and then youíre not from there. I wrestle with that and disagree, especially in with my situation. What yíall think?
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Old Today, 12:03 AM
 
Location: Chi > DC > Reno > SEA
1,619 posts, read 751,564 times
Reputation: 2055
Yeah, I grew up 100% on the Illinois side of Chicagoland, but all of my extended family is from Indiana (and not just NWI), and I went to family reunions there every couple years and visited my grandparents and cousins multiple times a year on the holidays. And I went to college in Ohio, so each time I was crossing all of Indiana.

I do feel partially Hoosier, and when I'm in the rural areas of the state it feels familiar and safe somehow in a way that most of the Midwest doesn't. (But I also have a separate, weird attachment to the non-Chicagoland part of Illinois despite having no family there and rarely visiting.)
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Old Today, 08:15 AM
 
723 posts, read 142,838 times
Reputation: 1421
I HATE going to a Dodger or Angel game here in SoCal and being surrounded by people from new york or boston {spits to cleanse the mouth} when their teams are in town.
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