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Old 01-18-2012, 09:53 PM
 
115 posts, read 296,863 times
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Hello,

On many forums for exotic, fun, or popular locales such as Boulder, Colorado, Honolulu, Key West, Las Vegas, etc and even some mainstream places such as North Carolina and New York City (ever see the long debates on gentrification) there are complaints about transplants moving in and taking over. My question is, do those of you who religously believe in the native versus transplant boundary, can you see any gray areas between transplants and natives. By definition, a native is born and bred in an areas while a transplant is born and raised elsewhere.

However, what about the following scenario:

In many cases, a person who has a parent from a particular location simply has a parent from a particular location. That's all.


For example, some people who grew up on Park Avenue whose parents came from the South, Midwest, or even a foreign country simply have a parent from those areas, and be 100 percent culturally Park Avenue but there can be other situations.

Example:

Let us suppose a man's famly has a long history from South Carolina dating back to 1890. Their family has been deeply a part of that area.

This man is the best to move away to say New York City. He then has a child there.

The child has a close relationship with his father who passes on some values from growing up in South Carolina, causes him to develop a taste in South Carolina style food, makes sure that he spends every school summer with the relatives in South Carolina. This child then makes many summer childhood friends, and has memories of childhood summer in South Carolina in his head.

This child develops mannerisms and an accent that resembles a New Yorker by 70 percent and a South Carolinian by 30 percent. Up to age 22 he spends every summer in South Carolina. However, he goes to school in New York City and was born in NYC. If he decides to move after finnishing say Law school to South Carolina to work and live, would you consider him a pure Yankee transplant, a southerner, or a cultural hybrid.

Take the same situation with someone whose parent comes from an exotic locale like rural Alaksa or Maui, Hawaii and spends every summer in that location and has some tastes in food and even a slight hint in their accent from that place. If they were technically born in the Continental USA and spent the school year in the continental USA, and decided to move there after college would you consider them a native, a transplant, or a hyrbid?

I guess my questions are:

A. Do you think a person is either a transplant or native of a particular place or are there hybirds/gray areas?

B. Do you think it is okay for a person to identify as a native with a place that they are technically not from, if they have a strong cultural influence via their parents?

I would appreciate any thoughts on this matter.

Thanks
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Old 01-18-2012, 09:59 PM
 
Location: Keizer, OR
1,376 posts, read 2,525,952 times
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I believe there can easily be grey areas. I was born in Northern California, and went to LA almost every summer while living in Portland, and my dad is from Oakland originally. I'd say I'm California enough to call myself a native, but with all my family being from Oregon, I tend to associate myself with it more. I feel my attitudes and beliefs feel more NorCal than SoCal, which may be something I got from my dad. Living in Orange County has made me realise this too.
I also lived in Texas for part of my childhood, where my mother is from, so I also feel like I have strong ties to Texas.
If people want to move some place, they should respect it for what it is, and stop pining to feel "home". I mean hello? Didn't you leave for a reason?
A lot of SoCal transplants tend to turn places they move to into their yuppie wastelands, which brings in development of sprawl and strip malls. Ick.
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Old 01-19-2012, 12:25 AM
 
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In response to the OP's hypothetical situation about the SC/NY guy: While I wouldn't call him a Yankee transplant, but he's still a transplant that just happens to have deep family roots in SC. Just because someone visits a place a lot doesn't necessarily mean they're part of that area's social fabric. So in response to A and B... no. Either they're native (born/bred/raised) or transplants. Usually with transplants, once they've been in the area long enough they become "long (term/time) residents".

A "cultural Hybrid"... just me personally, I'd rather reserve that for someone who has cross National lines (American who spent many summers in Japan and eventually moves there as an adult for example).
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Old 01-19-2012, 12:41 AM
 
Location: Keizer, OR
1,376 posts, read 2,525,952 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Inkpoe View Post
In response to the OP's hypothetical situation about the SC/NY guy: While I wouldn't call him a Yankee transplant, but he's still a transplant that just happens to have deep family roots in SC. Just because someone visits a place a lot doesn't necessarily mean they're part of that area's social fabric. So in response to A and B... no. Either they're native (born/bred/raised) or transplants. Usually with transplants, once they've been in the area long enough they become "long (term/time) residents".

A "cultural Hybrid"... just me personally, I'd rather reserve that for someone who has cross National lines (American who spent many summers in Japan and eventually moves there as an adult for example).
What if you can't decide where your hometown is? This was a major problem for me as a kid.
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Old 01-19-2012, 12:46 AM
 
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Yes... I was an Army brat then my family moved to Seattle. But I don't really feel like a Seattleite, though I suppose I should call myself that because we lived there the longest. I just say I mostly grew up in Seattle. I still don't have a "hometown" that I heavily identify with right now or ever really did.
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Old 01-19-2012, 08:25 AM
 
11,200 posts, read 22,448,358 times
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I grew up in Iowa and went to high school and the U of Iowa there. Then I moved to Chicago at age 22 and am going on 11 years now living in the city. I'm still a transplant, but having lived from 22 to 33 and Chicago has defined my adult life and where I am as a person more than growing up for 22 years in Iowa.

I'm obviously a transplant, but I know the city, politics and history of this area much more than many of my friends. They just grew up here and go with the flow, I dug my fingers deep and am very curious and interested in anything and everything that has, is or will make Chicago tick.
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Old 01-19-2012, 08:44 AM
 
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I consider myself a native of Florida despite the fact that I have lived in many other states and even out of the country for a number of years. I consider myself a native because Florida is the state of my birth, where I have lived the longest, and where my family and ethnic culture is from (I am west indian). But living in Texas for a number of years and being immersed in that culture and having my best friends live in that state, I technically could be considered a native of that region too. So I don't know either.
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Old 01-19-2012, 09:14 AM
 
Location: Huntington Beach, CA
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im a NY native, Now living in Southern California, most of my friends and family have told me that I have "gone native". I 've pretty much established myself as a "local"
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Old 01-19-2012, 10:02 AM
 
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It's not up to us to decide.

It's what they say they are. Period.
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Old 01-19-2012, 05:37 PM
 
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Definitely gray areas. I feel cultural ties to Chicago where my parents grew up - though I have never lived there. I'm attached to TN and can speak and understand the local dialect but still feel something's missing. I feel no connection whatsoever to the state where I was born and spent the first 3 years of my life.
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