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Old 01-20-2012, 11:01 AM
 
Location: Up on the moon laughing down on you
18,509 posts, read 28,169,813 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rnc2mbfl View Post
I definitely agree with San Francisco being centralized but I'd also add Miami to that category with its less than 36 square miles of land.
I don't think the OP meant centralized in terms of a small core. He specified centralized as having most amenities in the core.

Miami is small but there are tons of goodies outside the city itself.
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Old 01-20-2012, 11:31 AM
 
Location: Atlanta
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Metro Matt View Post
San Francisco isn't centralized, its not even the largest city in its metro.
Wrong. San Jose happens to have more residents, but if you believe for one minute that the core of San Francisco isn't centralized than you have no clue.

San Francisco basically functions like a West Coast Manhattan, with bridge and tunnel people (and ferries) converging in huge numbers every weekday. You have Caltrain bringing people up from the peninsula, BART bringing them in from across the bay and the 101 and I-80 bringing them in across the bridges. It is THE most centralized Downtown on the West Coast by far, followed by Seattle.

San Francisco also functions as THE retail hub of it's region, unlike most other metro areas.
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Old 01-20-2012, 11:59 AM
hsw
 
2,144 posts, read 6,350,982 times
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SF is very decentralized on any economic basis
Most of region's high-income jobs are scattered across various suburban offices around PaloAlto area, not in SF or SJ or any other specific suburb
A few 1000 yuppies live in SF and drive to offices 35mis S; if anything, SF is a distant yuppie bedroom suburb of SiliconValley
And most high-income workers w/kids who work in SV choose to live in various suburbs scattered around PaloAlto, not SF or SJ or EastBay
Modern, economically efficient/innovative regions like SiliconValley or Redmond or Irving/Plano are decentralized, suburban and car-centric, not surprising in modern regions where much work/learning/shopping, etc occurs online
Primitive towns like SF and Manhattan largely exist as props for clueless tourists who confuse masses of people, traffic jams, mass transit and skyscrapers with economic relevance...
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Old 01-20-2012, 12:06 PM
 
Location: Atlanta
7,732 posts, read 12,152,690 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hsw View Post
SF is very decentralized on any economic basis
Most of region's high-income jobs are scattered across various suburban offices around PaloAlto area, not in SF or SJ or any other specific suburb
A few 1000 yuppies live in SF and drive to offices 35mis S; if anything, SF is a distant yuppie bedroom suburb of SiliconValley
And most high-income workers w/kids who work in SV choose to live in various suburbs scattered around PaloAlto, not SF or SJ or EastBay
Modern, economically efficient/innovative regions like SiliconValley or Redmond or Irving/Plano are decentralized, suburban and car-centric, not surprising in modern regions where much work/learning/shopping, etc occurs online
Primitive towns like SF and Manhattan largely exist as props for clueless tourists who confuse masses of people, traffic jams, mass transit and skyscrapers with economic relevance...
This is beyond laughable on so many levels.......
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Old 01-20-2012, 12:14 PM
 
Location: Portland, Oregon
2,438 posts, read 4,225,191 times
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Portland has an Urban Growth Boundary to prevent sprawl.
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Old 01-20-2012, 12:35 PM
 
Location: Upper East Side of Texas
12,521 posts, read 23,108,472 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by johnatl View Post
Wrong. San Jose happens to have more residents, but if you believe for one minute that the core of San Francisco isn't centralized than you have no clue.

San Francisco basically functions like a West Coast Manhattan, with bridge and tunnel people (and ferries) converging in huge numbers every weekday. You have Caltrain bringing people up from the peninsula, BART bringing them in from across the bay and the 101 and I-80 bringing them in across the bridges. It is THE most centralized Downtown on the West Coast by far, followed by Seattle.

San Francisco also functions as THE retail hub of it's region, unlike most other metro areas.
Centralized cities would be Houston, San Antonio, Phoenix, OKC, Atlanta, Chicago, etc.

Decentralized cities would be San Francisco, Los Angeles, Dallas, Minneapolis, etc.
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Old 01-20-2012, 12:43 PM
 
Location: The City
22,331 posts, read 32,161,575 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Metro Matt View Post
Centralized cities would be Houston, San Antonio, Phoenix, OKC, Atlanta, Chicago, etc.

Decentralized cities would be San Francisco, Los Angeles, Dallas, Minneapolis, etc.

Chicago yes, Houston and Phoenix, no way unless you are talking the enormous city borders, though many other cities would pack more into that space than either of those two.

NYC, Boston, Philly, Chicago may be the most centralized (i.e. a majority of "stuff" is centered in the core.

SF to me is also very centralized in terms of concentration in the city.

Do you ever leave Texas, seriously
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Old 01-20-2012, 12:49 PM
 
Location: Up on the moon laughing down on you
18,509 posts, read 28,169,813 times
Reputation: 7598
I see a centralized city as one where all eyes are towards that city in the metro.

If the metro is great by saying that there is a good opera house in that City, and over there in that city has a good zoo, and in this one has major companies and that one has great jobs. Nah.


I think NY is centralized because although there are tons to do outside NYC, the stuff inside NYC is just so overwhelming that it spills into the burbs.
Chicago, Philadelphia and many other cities are like that.

Houston, Phoenix, and some other cities are middle of the road. They have everything in the central city and the burbs are for the most part burbs.

On the least centralized cities, I would put the cities with multiple poles. Metro areas like DFW, MSP, etc have tons of amenities but not just in one city.
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Old 01-20-2012, 12:56 PM
 
Location: Up on the moon laughing down on you
18,509 posts, read 28,169,813 times
Reputation: 7598
Quote:
Originally Posted by kidphilly View Post
Chicago yes, Houston and Phoenix, no way unless you are talking the enormous city borders, though many other cities would pack more into that space than either of those two.

NYC, Boston, Philly, Chicago may be the most centralized (i.e. a majority of "stuff" is centered in the core.

SF to me is also very centralized in terms of concentration in the city.

Do you ever leave Texas, seriously
Houston and Phoenix may have large land borders, but Houston's DT is still the major economic center. There are three sports stadium in DT Houston and one more in the Loop.

Within the loop has major economic centers such, as Downtown, TMC and Greenway plaza with uptown being adjacent to the loop. The museums are all centralized in the loop. The theaters and other live fine art houses are centralized in the loop. All 3 airports are within City limits. The Port is in the central limits.

It may be a larger land area, that is why I said it was more middle of the road, but for the most part, Houston is amenity central of its metro.
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Old 01-20-2012, 01:03 PM
 
Location: The City
22,331 posts, read 32,161,575 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by HtownLove View Post
Houston and Phoenix may have large land borders, but Houston's DT is still the major economic center. There are three sports stadium in DT Houston and one more in the Loop.

Within the loop has major economic centers such, as Downtown, TMC and Greenway plaza with uptown being adjacent to the loop. The museums are all centralized in the loop. The theaters and other live fine art houses are centralized in the loop. All 3 airports are within City limits. The Port is in the central limits.

It may be a larger land area, that is why I said it was more middle of the road, but for the most part, Houston is amenity central of its metro.

Think this is mostly fair; and one thing I like about Houston relative to DFW is it is becoming more centralized though at this point Houston and DFW still feel more comparable in this reagrd than say Houston to a Chicago or Boston
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