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Old 01-21-2012, 11:49 AM
 
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I see Philly as unconcentrated because a lot of the cultural stuff is in Fairmount Park - away from downtown. The sports center isn't particularly close, either.
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Old 01-21-2012, 01:01 PM
 
Location: The City
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Quote:
Originally Posted by creeksitter View Post
I see Philly as unconcentrated because a lot of the cultural stuff is in Fairmount Park - away from downtown. The sports center isn't particularly close, either.
Other than the Please Touch Museum what is in Fairmont Park, maybe the Mann? And seriously in terms of cultural "stuff" the VAST majority is all within a 10 minute walk of each other, from this standpoint Philly is probably as concentrated as any city in America from a cultural "stuff" standpoint.

Also while the sports complex is 2-3 miles from city hall, last night I went to Sixers, stayed till the end and rode the subway (5 minutes on the express train) back to Center City and watched the post game press conferance 15 minutes later with a beer in my hand at a bar.
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Old 01-22-2012, 12:19 AM
 
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Off topic, but I may be the only person on City-Data who loves the fact that all of Philly's stadiums are in the same location in South Philly, with big parking lots in every direction (yes I know, EVIL EVIL EVIL) that give enough space for the amazing tailgating that goes on out there.

And as KidPhilly said, the Broad St. subway takes you to the Center City bars really quick after the game, the platform at Pattison Station is extra wide and designed to quickly move thousands of people back to Center City after games.
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Old 01-22-2012, 12:26 AM
 
Location: Keizer, OR
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One of the less centralised IMO would be Portland, OR. Many of it's bigger companies (like Nike) are headquartered in the suburbs.
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Old 01-22-2012, 01:31 AM
 
Location: North Texas
23,991 posts, read 32,798,789 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GunnerTHB View Post
+1 for Dallas (for being spread out). A friend of mine said he went to Dallas a few years ago and said it looked like my hometown (about 38,000 people) except that it went on for what seems like forever.
It's not quite that bad, but it's not very centralized either.

San Antonio is much worse IMHO.
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Old 01-22-2012, 08:30 AM
 
Location: The City
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Quote:
Originally Posted by soug View Post
Off topic, but I may be the only person on City-Data who loves the fact that all of Philly's stadiums are in the same location in South Philly, with big parking lots in every direction (yes I know, EVIL EVIL EVIL) that give enough space for the amazing tailgating that goes on out there.

And as KidPhilly said, the Broad St. subway takes you to the Center City bars really quick after the game, the platform at Pattison Station is extra wide and designed to quickly move thousands of people back to Center City after games.

Well if any of the infill ever takes place (more than Philly live hopefully) it will be much better; the area is very functional and not at all inconvienient. CC has many other things.

You are correct on AT&T station at the stadiums, it is the single highest capacity subway station in the country, it was designed to move 38,000 into and out the location within 15 minutes; though it usually never runs this way it can simulteneously load 8 6 car length trains at once at the station, nearly 50 subway cars simulteneously, very handy when a game lets out (especially a Phils or Eagles game). Last year the BSL moved 1.5 million people to Phillies games alone. IT is very easy from CC actually and especially for Phils or Eagles games you can back at a bar in CC well before people are even close to getting out of the parking lots.

Other than MSG and the staples center no other major stadiums are directly in the core of the city (or at least the top DTs). Many that have been built have been to help stimulate, not really as fill in already top tier DT. That could even be said for the area in and around the staples center

Even Fenwat for example is nearly as far fromthe Fin District as CBP is from CC, though the bar scene around Fenway is better.

Chicagos stadiums are not closer really, maybe more interesting locations though
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Old 01-22-2012, 08:52 AM
 
Location: So California
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The cities with the strongest downtowns, are the most centralized cities. The usual culprits, we know who they are.
Saying that, every large metro area in the US is somewhat decentralized, there's no way around that. Americans love single family houses, this creates suburban development/sprawl/decentralization. Matt's confusing the two.
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Old 01-22-2012, 11:31 AM
 
Location: NYC
2,312 posts, read 2,582,629 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hsw View Post
SF is very decentralized on any economic basis
Most of region's high-income jobs are scattered across various suburban offices around PaloAlto area, not in SF or SJ or any other specific suburb
A few 1000 yuppies live in SF and drive to offices 35mis S; if anything, SF is a distant yuppie bedroom suburb of SiliconValley
And most high-income workers w/kids who work in SV choose to live in various suburbs scattered around PaloAlto, not SF or SJ or EastBay
Modern, economically efficient/innovative regions like SiliconValley or Redmond or Irving/Plano are decentralized, suburban and car-centric, not surprising in modern regions where much work/learning/shopping, etc occurs online
Primitive towns like SF and Manhattan largely exist as props for clueless tourists who confuse masses of people, traffic jams, mass transit and skyscrapers with economic relevance...
Where do you live?
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Old 01-22-2012, 11:33 AM
 
Location: The City
22,331 posts, read 32,143,293 times
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Wall Street is obviously irrelevant...
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Old 01-22-2012, 11:37 AM
 
Location: NYC
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kidphilly View Post
Wall Street is obviously irrelevant...
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