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Old 02-16-2012, 04:50 PM
 
Location: The canyon (with my pistols and knife)
13,222 posts, read 17,972,432 times
Reputation: 14673

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Pittsburgh is very centralized. Consider...

Quote:
Originally Posted by Harold D. Miller
Although Pittsburgh ranks only 59th in the number of residents, it ranks 25th in the number of jobs located in the city (in businesses of all types). In 2004, there were nearly 300,000 jobs in the city of Pittsburgh, more than in many cities that are much bigger in terms of population.

And the city would probably rank even higher if it weren't so small; Pittsburgh ranks sixth in the country in jobs per square mile, behind only Boston, Miami, New York, San Francisco and Washington, D.C.

The jobs located in the city of Pittsburgh support families throughout the entire region. In fact, only about a third are filled by people who live in the city. Nearly 200,000 people, from every county in southwestern Pennsylvania and from West Virginia and Ohio, come to Pittsburgh every day to work.

Most people don't realize how much our region's economy depends on the city of Pittsburgh. More than one of every four jobs in the Pittsburgh metro area is located in the city. Moreover, the city houses three-quarters of the region's higher education jobs, half of the jobs in finance and company headquarters, and more than one-third of the jobs in professional services, health care and arts and entertainment. Several of these are the sectors that have created almost all of the region's job growth in the past several years.

And of course, the city doesn't offer just jobs; it also is the region's primary source for advanced health care, higher education, culture, entertainment and sports, which are major attractions for talented workers, regardless of where in the region they live.


Also consider...

Quote:
Originally Posted by Chris Briem
...despite a lot of popular belief to the contrary, the ability of the City of Pittsburgh to attract and retain jobs has almost never been problematic. If you ever hear someone talk about folks taking business out of the city because of (fill in the blank: taxes, politicians, crime, traffic, ???, oh and don't forget the potential of regulations on gas drilling that does not exist), you should call them on it. They may have an anectdotal example for sure, but for every job 'fleeing' the city for some suburban location, some job is being created elsewhere in the city.

I've said this before, but time series of jobs located in the City proper are about as stable as any economic metric in the region, or in any other Northeastern US urban core, over many decades. In 1958, the late Edgar Hoover and his team studying the Pittsburgh economy counted 294,000 jobs located in the city proper and 107,000 in the Golden Triangle specifically. 1958! So well before the collapse of heavy industry in town. Those numbers are virtually identical today which tells me there is a certain limit to how many jobs can efficiently be located in what are some relatively (very) constrained areas. So those jobs 'forced' out of the city are if anything, being forced out by the jobs that want to be located here, or are fairly immediately replaced. Not exactly a bad situation to have and one that has persisted through some very good and very bad economic times for the region.



Quote:
Originally Posted by Chris Briem
If you think the city is retaining lower paying jobs while the 'better' jobs are the ones fleeing to the suburbs you would be wrong again. From the same data as that chart, the average annual income for jobs located in the city proper compared to the remainder of the MSA:

Average Annual Pay

Yr PGH City Rest of MSA Ratio
1991 $35,119 $29,122 1.21
2007 $47,669 $35,715 1.33

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Old 02-16-2012, 06:55 PM
 
Location: Up on the moon laughing down on you
18,509 posts, read 28,184,194 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bu2 View Post

Now if you are talking about sprawl vs. compactness, Houston, San Antonio and San Francisco would switch categories.
If you are looking at every county in the metro then yes, but if you are looking at the urban areas then no.

Houston has a denser Urban area than Boston and Philly, which means there is more gaps in the NE metros while Houston, LA and Phoenix have more consistent density but lacking the extremely dense cores.

SF has a very dense UA so it would not be in the sprawl category but Houston's UA is not as Sprawling as it is made out to be on CD.

The definition of Sprawl as I know it means new development spreading out in all directions with major gaps in between the burbs and the Core. Again the Land dedicated to Houston's MSA is huge -10 large counties, but the UA basically lies in 1 of the 10 large counties.

NY, Chicago, Atlanta, Philly, Boston, LA, etc all have Urban areas occupying more land.

List of United States urban areas - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

The Data is all old but Its all we have until 2013.
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Old 02-16-2012, 09:40 PM
 
Location: Austin, TX
10,805 posts, read 9,439,330 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hsw View Post
SF is very decentralized on any economic basis
Most of region's high-income jobs are scattered across various suburban offices around PaloAlto area, not in SF or SJ or any other specific suburb
A few 1000 yuppies live in SF and drive to offices 35mis S; if anything, SF is a distant yuppie bedroom suburb of SiliconValley
And most high-income workers w/kids who work in SV choose to live in various suburbs scattered around PaloAlto, not SF or SJ or EastBay
Modern, economically efficient/innovative regions like SiliconValley or Redmond or Irving/Plano are decentralized, suburban and car-centric, not surprising in modern regions where much work/learning/shopping, etc occurs online
Primitive towns like SF and Manhattan largely exist as props for clueless tourists who confuse masses of people, traffic jams, mass transit and skyscrapers with economic relevance...
Car centric communities are inefficient. It's inefficient to build 16 lane freeways across expansive areas of land. Much more cost efficient to pack many people into a space.
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Old 02-16-2012, 09:50 PM
 
Location: Austin, TX
10,805 posts, read 9,439,330 times
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New Orleans is very centralized. Everything there is to do in New Orleans is contained within a couple of square miles, from watching sporting events, going to restaurants, bar hopping, going to museums, parks, etc... In fact it's all within walking distance...
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Old 02-16-2012, 11:16 PM
 
Location: Up on the moon laughing down on you
18,509 posts, read 28,184,194 times
Reputation: 7598
Quote:
Originally Posted by cBach View Post
Car centric communities are inefficient. It's inefficient to build 16 lane freeways across expansive areas of land. Much more cost efficient to pack many people into a space.
Cost effective yes, getting people to fall for it??? Not so easy.

People would rather move to areas already compact than to try making already large land area cities to develop dense pockets.

People fight Condos and other multifamily buildings tooth and nail here in every area except the business districts.
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