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Old 01-25-2012, 09:00 AM
 
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The hardest thing about a rough winter is road conditions. It makes driving dangersous and even impossible at certain points.

However, as a kid, there's something magical about winter, even severe ones. Kids can keep themselves busy for ours in the snow; it's good exercise; it's fun; it's pretty; it's fresh air, easy to breath; there's nothing more exciting than a snow day off from school; plus nothing beats hot chocolate on a snowy day. And there are tons of fun winter sports and games and activities that just can't be imitated with artificial snow.

That's why I'm a midwestern guy; I couldn't imagine life without snow.
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Old 01-25-2012, 09:22 AM
 
Location: IN
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TBideon View Post
The hardest thing about a rough winter is road conditions. It makes driving dangersous and even impossible at certain points.

However, as a kid, there's something magical about winter, even severe ones. Kids can keep themselves busy for ours in the snow; it's good exercise; it's fun; it's pretty; it's fresh air, easy to breath; there's nothing more exciting than a snow day off from school; plus nothing beats hot chocolate on a snowy day. And there are tons of fun winter sports and games and activities that just can't be imitated with artificial snow.

That's why I'm a midwestern guy; I couldn't imagine life without snow.
Frost heaves can get interesting
They tend to destroy roads in only a few years in places where more than 50 inches of snow falls per winter along with subzero temperatures mixed with freeze/thaw cycles.
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Old 01-25-2012, 10:21 AM
 
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Originally Posted by GraniteStater View Post
Frost heaves can get interesting
They tend to destroy roads in only a few years in places where more than 50 inches of snow falls per winter along with subzero temperatures mixed with freeze/thaw cycles.

They tend to destroy poorly-built roads.
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Old 01-25-2012, 10:47 AM
 
Location: IN
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Originally Posted by ram2 View Post
They tend to destroy poorly-built roads.
Well, they will tend to destroy a "newly built" road at a much slower rate so your premise is correct. However, extreme winter conditions over only a few years can cause problems even on well built surfaces. In rural areas, a town will choose not to even bother paving roads at all because it just costs the town way to much money to build and maintain them. One must have the right vehicle to traverse gravel and dirt roads during winter in these places.
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Old 01-25-2012, 11:44 AM
 
Location: Connecticut/ON, Canada
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I like colder weather, but hate wind with cold weather.

I don't mind snow at all, I just hate black ice while driving. I've almost peeled out many times, even while driving slow, and saw my life flash before my eyes in seconds. You really have to take control of the wheel, but I had some close calls where my front end swerved and almost went into the other side of the road. It's really scary :/

But luckily for now I spend most of the winter up at college in Canada, the only exception being Christmas break, and I walk or bus everywhere I left my car back in CT.

But cold by itself is fine in my book. I just hate the wind with it. Especially on Lake Ontario.
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Old 01-25-2012, 12:06 PM
 
Location: West Michigan
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GraniteStater View Post
Frost heaves can get interesting
They tend to destroy roads in only a few years in places where more than 50 inches of snow falls per winter along with subzero temperatures mixed with freeze/thaw cycles.
Grew up in Northern Michigan (Northern lower and the UP) and never even heard of a frost heave until I moved to the Northeast. It isn't so much the weather, it is the construction of the road from the base up. Northern Maine usually doesn't get many freeze/thaw cycles (once it gets cold, it stays cold until Spring) but the frost heaves get HUGE.
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Old 01-26-2012, 07:46 PM
 
Location: MN
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New Years Day 2011 we went sledding down a hill for fun. We had some cocktails and weren't wearing hats. The temperature was -10. My ears shedded skin for about 6 months after and are super sensitive still! I think I got frost bit! Oh well! That's what the winter does!
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Old 01-27-2012, 08:30 AM
 
11,177 posts, read 22,384,826 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by colton821 View Post
Also, when it goes above 40 degrees, people are outside like it's summer. Walking around in tshirts, golfing etc. It's kind of funny.
That's so true

I was thinking it today when I was riding the L to work and realized it's the end of January and I wasn't even wearing my coat. Then a guy gets on and sits down next to me wearing a t-shirt.

very odd winter. I'm normally use to temps around freezing give or take 10 degrees for highs. This winter I get shocked when I look at the 7 day forecast and there isn't anything in the 50's.
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Old 01-27-2012, 02:33 PM
 
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Originally Posted by Bydand View Post
Grew up in Northern Michigan (Northern lower and the UP) and never even heard of a frost heave until I moved to the Northeast. It isn't so much the weather, it is the construction of the road from the base up. Northern Maine usually doesn't get many freeze/thaw cycles (once it gets cold, it stays cold until Spring) but the frost heaves get HUGE.
In Southeastern MA, RI, and Connecticut roads get chewed up because it rains, then it freezes that night, then it melts the next day, then it freezes over and over again because the temps are 25-35F so the roads get completly destoryed
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Old 01-27-2012, 09:00 PM
 
Location: IN
20,852 posts, read 35,970,544 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bydand View Post
Grew up in Northern Michigan (Northern lower and the UP) and never even heard of a frost heave until I moved to the Northeast. It isn't so much the weather, it is the construction of the road from the base up. Northern Maine usually doesn't get many freeze/thaw cycles (once it gets cold, it stays cold until Spring) but the frost heaves get HUGE.

That is true in a more "typical winter." This year all the norms have been completely thrown out the window. It has been a continuous thaw or snow/muddy mess since winter began. Oh, we also had that dry period in early January with bare ground.

I haven't traveled extensively in northern Maine during winter, but some of the worst frost heaves that I have encounted were on route 153 in NH as well as route 113. Both in Carroll county.
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