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Old 01-21-2012, 07:23 PM
 
Location: The western periphery of Terra Australis
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Anything colder than Chicago? Especially a place like Minneapolis (I guess the coldest big city in the US, I imagine this question would be more pertinent for Canadian cities) I mean people still have to go to work, but do a lot fewer people go out for dining, entertainment etc? Or do they just all rug up but go out in similar numbers? Is it common for people to pass out drunk and freeze to death?

How is life for homeless folk? Are there a lot more shelters per capita? If for whatever reason they can't stay at shelters, are there public indoor areas open 24/7 where people can sleep during cold nights?
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Old 01-21-2012, 07:26 PM
 
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1) There isnt as many Homeless people in the north because its more liberal so there are more public shelters and welfare ect.
2) People rush from Place to place so on cold days people still go out but people are almost running to there destination so there time on the sidewalk is shorter so it seems less busy
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Old 01-21-2012, 07:46 PM
 
Location: Ontario
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I live in a town about the same temp as chicago and we do get several inches of snow dumped on us at once several times a year. I think people do stay home more often during the winter especially during heavy snowfall. People where I live are more scared of winter driving than you might imagine. I have a coworker who lives in a rural area about 45 mins away from work and she will not come to work on really snowy days as the back country roads are not plowed very well.

Personally I hate driving in snow. I don't mind cold weather as much and I think sometimes snow can be beautiful as long as I don't have to drive in it.
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Old 01-21-2012, 07:58 PM
 
Location: Valdez, Alaska
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Winter makes up about half the year here. In places with shorter winters or intermittently cold temperatures, I guess people might rush about and try to avoid it, but if you live in most of Alaska, winters are going to be cold. No sense in hiding from it. And most people here don't like it too warm anyways, and are pretty acclimated to winter temperatures. You might see more people out walking when it's sunny and calm, but there are still people out walking dogs, walking to the store, or whatever when there's a foot of snow on the sidewalk or it's below zero. It's just a normal day.

Homeless people here do have it tough, along with those who can't afford to adequately heat their homes. And sometimes inebriated people do die of exposure, especially in Anchorage. Homeless people and other poor people also die of heat exposure in the summers though, even in northern cities. I'm not sure one is really worse than the other.
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Old 01-22-2012, 05:07 AM
 
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Places that know how to handle snow generally go about life as usual. People still go out. Maybe not as much as they would in other seasons, but they still do it. Many people use it to their advantage by ice skating, skiing, winter festivals and sledding, along with other activities.

Those that are homeless have options in terms of places to stay by way of shelters.
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Old 01-22-2012, 08:27 AM
 
Location: OH
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ckhthankgod View Post
Places that know how to handle snow generally go about life as usual. People still go out. Maybe not as much as they would in other seasons, but they still do it. Many people use it to their advantage by ice skating, skiing, winter festivals and sledding, along with other activities.

Those that are homeless have options in terms of places to stay by way of shelters.
I've noticed this in Cleveland, as well as New York State. NYS probably has the best snow removal of the areas I've experienced. I was in Rochester a few years back when a lake effect storm dumped a quick 10 inches on the city. The next day, it was as if the snow magically disappeared on the roads; they were bone dry with not a trace of snow on the major thoroughfares. NW Penna also gets a lot of snow, but their snow removal lacks in comparison to NYS from my experiences. But then again, you guys get raped on taxes, so anything less would be unnacceptable.

A 10 inch snowfall would have this city (Cincinnati) paralyzed, especially if it happened within a few hour timespan like what I experienced in Rochester. Hell, even the measly 3-6 in snowfalls we get (which seem to always happen overnight, should be easier to handle) tend to cripple the city.
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Old 01-22-2012, 09:44 AM
 
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I live just 14 miles south of the coldest town in the lower 48. (Look it up!)

The general population of transient homeless are smart enough not to stay north when it's cold - they go to warmer climates. Actually we don't have that variety of homeless, although Duluth might.

As the poster from Alaska said, a few "inebriates" may stay out in the cold too long at night and do die of exposure in the winters in this general region - but it hasn't happened in my town in recent memory. I imagine the police look out for folks coming out of the bars late at night.

As for the rest of us, the main thing is that we've learned to respect the weather: We have good snow tires, 4 Wheel Drive, and a winter driving kit in our cars. We just get used to the fact that there is snow pack on the roads for at least 3 months of the year. You haven't lived until you've driven on a hilly frozen gravel road which is right next to a lake. Wheeeee!

Most people have block heaters installed in their engines and plug their cars in at night. We also leave our cars running when we're at the post office and grocery store and other "quick stop" places so we're sure we can get them running again when we're through with errands. Yes, the keys are in the ignition (durr). Cars aren't stolen - who wants to joy ride in snow pack?

Houses have full basements so that pipes can be inside. I'm assuming the town water pipes are well insulated and low in the ground, but I shockingly know nothing about this.

Some people make a living just from winter snow plowing. Lots of people have plow blades which they attach to the front of their pick ups in the winter. If you're lucky the county will plow your driveway (for a fee) if you have a long one. I put my garage right off the alley so I don't even have to shovel snow! In larger towns people are responsible for shoveling the public sidewalks that go through their property.

Our ancestors reallly had to work hard cutting sufficient wood and trapping furry creatures to provide the means to stay warm though the winter. But we just buy heating oil or pay for natural gas like the rest of you, although we probably more have supplemental heating devices such as corn or wood or paper burning furnaces (the modern ones of which are located outside, FYI.)

The wild animals come closer to town in the winter to scout for food. It's not smart to leave garbage cans outside until right before pick-up. There's a wolf pack that comes down from the hills behind my house - they do go for cats and small dogs. That's why I have an 8' fence.

There's no vanity in the winter. We wear whatever is warmest, be that long johns or sweats or 3 layers of jackets or socks up to the knees outside your jeans. Below the knee coats are good. Most of us have hat or hood hair in public all winter long. The best type of boot is a popular topic of conversation. I just counted and I have 3 pairs of winter gloves and 5 pairs of mittens (mittens are warmer) and usually most of them are wet.

Almost everyone where I live has a sauna in their yard or basement.

But really for most of us a 30 below 0 night in 2012 means snuggling up at home with the furnace cranked up to 65 watching satellite tv or playing on the computer - just like the rest of you.

I love winter. I step outside my back door and can snowshoe or ski, and skating is just a hike away. Hoar frost on the trees in the forest is one of the most beautiful sights ever. This year's warm winter is depressing.
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Old 01-22-2012, 11:27 AM
 
Location: Victoria TX
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Duluth, in winter, is a very active, vibrant town. Throughout Canada, it's business as usual all winter.
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Old 01-22-2012, 11:34 AM
 
Location: South St Louis
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I heard that in some Alaskan towns, they let some of their vehicles idle continuously on the coldest days, to keep the engines from freezing up. I assume they are referring mostly to emergency vehicles.
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Old 01-22-2012, 01:05 PM
 
Location: Cleveland bound with MPLS in the rear-view
5,530 posts, read 10,147,448 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jtur88 View Post
Duluth, in winter, is a very active, vibrant town. Throughout Canada, it's business as usual all winter.
Yeah, Minneapolis as well. The attitude is much different than most Northern cities and it's more like Canada this way, I suppose. People tend to embrace the weather (no matter the season) and make lemonade out of lemons, so to speak. However, I'd definitely say that people go out LESS during winter and stay in with family more (also a big time of year to drink alcohol!). It's sort of the unofficial time to spend with family I'd say. Unlike most places when the temps drop below 30 though, winter doesn't stop most people from doing what they want -- they just bundle up and go for it!

I really love it most of the time!
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