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Old 03-03-2012, 05:40 AM
 
Location: Hernando County, FL
8,488 posts, read 17,951,427 times
Reputation: 5397

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Quote:
Originally Posted by btownboss4 View Post
So your telling my that 25% of Mississippians starve, and 36% are fat, so that leaves 34% or 1/3rd of Mississipians are heathy, thats BS.
A good percentage of the 25% are going to be included in the 36% so it doesn't just as simple as adding the 2 numbers and taking what is left over. You can be obese while still have problems feeding your family.
Poverty is by far the biggest factor when you examine the problem of obesity in the country.
As previously stated, educating those below the poverty level on proper nutrition rather than just having them go out and keep buying processed food products which are generally higher in trans-fat, corn syrup, and any number of other things that are not as healthy as raw fruits, vegetables and meats, as well as more expensive would be a big step in reducing the hunger problem as well as the obesity rate.
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Old 03-03-2012, 08:29 AM
 
Location: Midwest
506 posts, read 1,083,317 times
Reputation: 336
Quote:
Originally Posted by 1208 View Post
I don't get how that is a problem of cooking and nutrition.
Because it is possible to get proper nourishment with very little money.
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Old 03-03-2012, 02:19 PM
 
9,394 posts, read 9,554,064 times
Reputation: 5795
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mike1306 View Post
A good percentage of the 25% are going to be included in the 36% so it doesn't just as simple as adding the 2 numbers and taking what is left over. You can be obese while still have problems feeding your family.
Poverty is by far the biggest factor when you examine the problem of obesity in the country.
As previously stated, educating those below the poverty level on proper nutrition rather than just having them go out and keep buying processed food products which are generally higher in trans-fat, corn syrup, and any number of other things that are not as healthy as raw fruits, vegetables and meats, as well as more expensive would be a big step in reducing the hunger problem as well as the obesity rate.
If your obese and can't feed yourself, you won't be obese for long, you can't be fat and starving for any sizable amount of time.
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Old 03-03-2012, 05:03 PM
 
Location: Washington, DC NoVA
1,105 posts, read 1,949,218 times
Reputation: 775
Quote:
Originally Posted by 18Montclair View Post
No one in this rich country should be going hungry btw. SMH. But alas, there are many who appear to be facing hardships as far as being able to eat. The more important question is what can those of us who are fortunate enough to afford food, what can we do about it?

http://frac.org/pdf/food_hardship_2011_report.pdf

Maybe we can start by donating to local food banks when we can? Food for thought(no pun intended).
there have been plenty of donations to food banks. i volunteered at one once and it was never busy. food was expiring off the shelves.

this is why i don't feel bad for people complaining. there is perfectly good food sitting on the shelves at the food banks until they expire and then we have to sort through them and toss it. this is a rich country and possibly the most generous in the world. there is more than enough food to be donated that has been donated that hardly anybody bothers to pick up. i don't know whether it's that they're not really going hungry and just complaining because they're not rich or whether they'd just rather get the ebt card and go buy yodels and chips at walmart.
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Old 03-04-2012, 02:54 AM
 
Location: Hernando County, FL
8,488 posts, read 17,951,427 times
Reputation: 5397
Quote:
Originally Posted by btownboss4 View Post
If your obese and can't feed yourself, you won't be obese for long, you can't be fat and starving for any sizable amount of time.
If you are obese and surviving on food stamps if would be very easy to stay that way with a high fat, high sugar diet of processed food products that many on food stamps tend to steer towards.
They may still be out of food stamps at the end of the month and not be able to adequately feed the family.
All you need to do is look at the high obesity rates in the areas of high poverty through out the country.
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Old 03-04-2012, 06:11 PM
 
304 posts, read 530,349 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rock_chalk View Post
Because it is possible to get proper nourishment with very little money.
It often is not. While there are many cheap foods that are garbage , it is difficult to eat healthily on "very little money". Now, one could argue what defines "very little money". But a healthy diet includes lots of protein, fresh fruits and vegetables and perhaps some dairy, depending on the individuals needs. Of course, a family must also purchase other essentials out of that same pocketbook - basic living expenses like toilet paper and laundry detergent.
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Old 03-05-2012, 03:49 AM
 
Location: Hernando County, FL
8,488 posts, read 17,951,427 times
Reputation: 5397
Quote:
Originally Posted by 1brokegirl View Post
It often is not. While there are many cheap foods that are garbage , it is difficult to eat healthily on "very little money". Now, one could argue what defines "very little money". But a healthy diet includes lots of protein, fresh fruits and vegetables and perhaps some dairy, depending on the individuals needs. Of course, a family must also purchase other essentials out of that same pocketbook - basic living expenses like toilet paper and laundry detergent.
While it may be difficult to eat healthy on very little money, it is at least as cheap or cheaper to eat healthy than it is to go get load up the shopping cart with processed food products like frozen pizzas, chips, grape drink and the like.

You need to keep in mind that there are also some canned vegetables that are actually healthier than those in the produce section. But even if someone is buying all canned vegetables it is still going to be much healthier than buying junk food and certainly cheaper.

The difference is, it takes longer to go through and see what meats are on sale, what is buy one get one free and then longer to cook it than it is to get the processed junk and throw it in the microwave.
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Old 03-05-2012, 07:18 AM
 
Location: Pacific NW
6,413 posts, read 10,397,418 times
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Yes, but things like pasta, potatoes, rice. Those are really low ticket items that people with less income often load up on. And they're not exactly low-calorie foods.
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Old 03-05-2012, 08:51 AM
 
11,177 posts, read 22,391,357 times
Reputation: 10924
Crazy to think in modern day America we have people who have a hard time just affording food of all things. I must live in a world away from those situations. Just seems so surreal. 20% of people on food stamps in some states!? I don't think I know anyone (of at least a decent friend status) who's ever actually seen a food stamp.
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Old 03-05-2012, 11:16 AM
 
Location: Midwest
506 posts, read 1,083,317 times
Reputation: 336
Quote:
Originally Posted by 1brokegirl View Post
It often is not. While there are many cheap foods that are garbage , it is difficult to eat healthily on "very little money". Now, one could argue what defines "very little money". But a healthy diet includes lots of protein, fresh fruits and vegetables and perhaps some dairy, depending on the individuals needs. Of course, a family must also purchase other essentials out of that same pocketbook - basic living expenses like toilet paper and laundry detergent.
Lentils, barley, beans, canned veggies, rice, milk, eggs. Fresh veggies can be purchased on sale or grown in a garden.
Quote:
Originally Posted by EnricoV View Post
Yes, but things like pasta, potatoes, rice. Those are really low ticket items that people with less income often load up on. And they're not exactly low-calorie foods.
They shouldn't be "low-calorie" foods. Most people need between 1500 and 3500 calories per day. Empty calories from soda and processed foods are the problem.
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