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Old 03-05-2012, 04:38 PM
 
958 posts, read 921,256 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bradjl2009 View Post
Wow I'm proud of my state having the 8th lowest food hardship ranking in the county, my metro having the 12st lowest food hardship, and 3 three other PA metros ranking with very low food hardship rates (Lancaster, York, and Harrisburg).
That's honestly surprising to me. We have places like Chester, Reading, etc where some people are really struggling. We've got parts of Philadelphia and even the surrounding counties where it's the same thing. There's a lot of former industrial municipalities where people struggle too.

It just goes to show you how uneven our state clearly is.

(This next part is not addressed at you) Oh and if you don't have a clue what it's like to not know where your next meal is coming from then please do not even remotely ever try to judge those who do or talk about it like you know something. Go out and do something about it if you have the means to.
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Old 03-05-2012, 11:01 PM
 
Location: Tennessee
34,667 posts, read 33,671,635 times
Reputation: 51854
Gee, why does food cost more? Could it be ridiculous environmental policies that put farms out of business, put corn in the gas tank instead of on the table or cause energy costs to "skyrocket" and those costs are passed down by businesses to the consumer?
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Old 05-19-2012, 11:24 AM
nei nei won $500 in our forum's Most Engaging Poster Contest - Thirteenth Edition (Jan-Feb 2015). 

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Location: Long Island / NYC
45,983 posts, read 41,921,149 times
Reputation: 14804
List by congressional district:

Food Insecurity

NYC proper has has two districts that are in the top 10 lowest in the country and two districts in the top 10 highest in the country.
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Old 05-21-2012, 07:02 PM
 
778 posts, read 1,409,866 times
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Food Hardship in the large cities Rate/rank

NYC 15.9/73
LA 19.5/30
Chicago 16.2/68
Dallas-FW 18.9/39
Houston 20.5/18
Philadelphia 16.1/70
Washington 12.7/94
Miami 20.5/18
Atlanta 19.7/27
Boston 13.4/91
SF 14.0/85

It's sad that Houston is touted as being the best up and coming city and as having this amazing economy while it also has such a bad rank for food hardship. Definitely some of the economic policies that keep its economy thriving affect food hardships.
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Old 05-21-2012, 07:37 PM
 
11,171 posts, read 22,363,867 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 55degrees View Post
Food Hardship in the large cities Rate/rank

NYC 15.9/73
LA 19.5/30
Chicago 16.2/68
Dallas-FW 18.9/39
Houston 20.5/18
Philadelphia 16.1/70
Washington 12.7/94
Miami 20.5/18
Atlanta 19.7/27
Boston 13.4/91
SF 14.0/85

It's sad that Houston is touted as being the best up and coming city and as having this amazing economy while it also has such a bad rank for food hardship. Definitely some of the economic policies that keep its economy thriving affect food hardships.
89% of Texas' population growth was due to minorities in the 2000's. Many of those were immigrants who might not have had opportunities or a lot of income. The economy is growing, the population is growing and jobs are being created, but it depends on the quality of the jobs and their wages.
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Old 05-21-2012, 07:40 PM
 
28,905 posts, read 46,707,147 times
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You know, I am always really suspicious of these kinds of surveys, chiefly because the criteria itself is often driven by agenda.

If Southern states have such a high Food Hardship rate, then how come they have the highest obesity rates, too?

Mississippi is the fattest state for 6th straight year, Colorado still leanest, Rhode Island getting fatter, Alaska slimmer

Well, which is it?
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Old 05-21-2012, 07:57 PM
nei nei won $500 in our forum's Most Engaging Poster Contest - Thirteenth Edition (Jan-Feb 2015). 

Over $104,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum and additional contests are planned
 
Location: Long Island / NYC
45,983 posts, read 41,921,149 times
Reputation: 14804
Quote:
Originally Posted by 55degrees View Post
Food Hardship in the large cities Rate/rank

NYC 15.9/73
LA 19.5/30
Chicago 16.2/68
Dallas-FW 18.9/39
Houston 20.5/18
Philadelphia 16.1/70
Washington 12.7/94
Miami 20.5/18
Atlanta 19.7/27
Boston 13.4/91
SF 14.0/85

It's sad that Houston is touted as being the best up and coming city and as having this amazing economy while it also has such a bad rank for food hardship. Definitely some of the economic policies that keep its economy thriving affect food hardships.
As I said earlier, NYC's rating looks better because it's masked by extreme inequality, looking at the link I posted earlier (parts of NYC are among the best in the nation others are among the worst).
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Old 05-21-2012, 09:38 PM
 
Location: Boston Metrowest (via the Philly area)
4,448 posts, read 7,517,195 times
Reputation: 4334
Quote:
Originally Posted by cpg35223 View Post
If Southern states have such a high Food Hardship rate, then how come they have the highest obesity rates, too?

Mississippi is the fattest state for 6th straight year, Colorado still leanest, Rhode Island getting fatter, Alaska slimmer

Well, which is it?
Hunger and obesity are not at all mutually exclusive. It's pretty well-known that lower-income areas/states also tend to have fewer healthful food options. Hence, food that is eaten tends to be of little nutritional value and causes obesity.
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Old 05-21-2012, 10:26 PM
 
778 posts, read 1,409,866 times
Reputation: 972
Quote:
Originally Posted by nei View Post
As I said earlier, NYC's rating looks better because it's masked by extreme inequality, looking at the link I posted earlier (parts of NYC are among the best in the nation others are among the worst).
But this isn't an average is it? It's just the percent of people who have had food hardships. If you have a community of 100 people and 5 don't have enough food, I think it wouldn't matter if the rest of the 95 people are millionaires or are middle class.
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Old 05-22-2012, 04:33 AM
 
Location: Hernando County, FL
8,488 posts, read 17,932,473 times
Reputation: 5397
Quote:
Originally Posted by cpg35223 View Post
You know, I am always really suspicious of these kinds of surveys, chiefly because the criteria itself is often driven by agenda.

If Southern states have such a high Food Hardship rate, then how come they have the highest obesity rates, too?

Mississippi is the fattest state for 6th straight year, Colorado still leanest, Rhode Island getting fatter, Alaska slimmer

Well, which is it?
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mike1306 View Post
If you are obese and surviving on food stamps if would be very easy to stay that way with a high fat, high sugar diet of processed food products that many on food stamps tend to steer towards.
They may still be out of food stamps at the end of the month and not be able to adequately feed the family.
All you need to do is look at the high obesity rates in the areas of high poverty through out the country.
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