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View Poll Results: What type of cities do you prefer. By Large bodies of water or not.
You prefer living by large body of water (Sea, Great Lakes, Ocean) 57 70.37%
You don't care for living by the water. 24 29.63%
Voters: 81. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 03-04-2012, 10:48 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Wahl_Wrighter View Post
I never realized how important living near the ocean is to me until I moved here to Cincinnati, OH from Easton, MD. The Ohio River doesn't cut it. I go up to Lake Erie a couple times a year during the summer months and it gives me a temporary fix, but it's still not like going to an actual beach. The smell, feel, look (and sometimes even taste) of being near the Atlantic cannot be replicated. I also miss the small things such as the shipyards, tunnels, bridges, drawbridges, lighthouse, etc. Hopefully I'll be back on the east coast somewhere within the next 2-3 years.

Rivers are not the same as a large lake with blue water. There are lighthouses all over the Great Lakes.
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Old 03-04-2012, 10:59 AM
 
Location: Bellingham, WA
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It's something I never really considered until I visited what is now the town where I live. After visiting Bellingham and Seattle, when I got back home to Tennessee there was a sort of claustrophobia. After a few weeks it went away and later I moved. But when I went back to TN to visit for Christmas, that feeling returned and I couldn't wait to leave. And I don't really understand that, because really, an expanse of water is far more limiting than an expanse of land (for me at least, since I don't have a boat). But that broad, open water does have a noticeable effect on me, and now I don't want to be without it.
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Old 03-04-2012, 11:18 AM
 
Location: Austin, Texas, USA
1,309 posts, read 2,352,572 times
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Great question grapico.

Personally I've never understood people's love affair with the ocean. I've lived near the third coast (Houston ) but spent over a decade living at the foot of Pikes Peak, 17 hours from the nearest beach and never missed it. For vacation, sure it's great, but for everyday living I can't wrap my head around feeling claustrophobic inland. I find the ocean pretty but monolithic and pretty boring, in comparison to the biological, geographical and recreational diversity you have with the mountains. I don't see how a view of the ocean can compare with the view of the Rockies from the top of Pikes Peak...granted that's a narrow comparison, but I can only speak from my own experience.

Even living in Austin now, 3 hours from the coast seems plenty close...there is still plenty of natural beauty around and the lakes, rivers and cold springs are plenty of water to satisfy me. I would be open to living on the coast but have no pre-existing desire to.
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Old 03-04-2012, 11:26 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by wag more bark less View Post
Great question grapico.

Personally I've never understood people's love affair with the ocean. I've lived near the third coast (Houston ) but spent over a decade living at the foot of Pikes Peak, 17 hours from the nearest beach and never missed it. For vacation, sure it's great, but for everyday living I can't wrap my head around feeling claustrophobic inland. I find the ocean pretty but monolithic and pretty boring, in comparison to the biological, geographical and recreational diversity you have with the mountains. I don't see how a view of the ocean can compare with the view of the Rockies from the top of Pikes Peak...granted that's a narrow comparison, but I can only speak from my own experience.

Even living in Austin now, 3 hours from the coast seems plenty close...there is still plenty of natural beauty around and the lakes, rivers and cold springs are plenty of water to satisfy me. I would be open to living on the coast but have no pre-existing desire to.


If you own a boat by/on a large body of water, you can take day/weekend boat trips to neat places. Many in Detroit cruise up to Canada's Georgian Bay, Lake Erie Islands, etc.
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Old 03-04-2012, 01:20 PM
 
Location: roaming gnome
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Quote:
Originally Posted by wag more bark less View Post
Great question grapico.

Personally I've never understood people's love affair with the ocean. I've lived near the third coast (Houston ) but spent over a decade living at the foot of Pikes Peak, 17 hours from the nearest beach and never missed it. For vacation, sure it's great, but for everyday living I can't wrap my head around feeling claustrophobic inland. I find the ocean pretty but monolithic and pretty boring, in comparison to the biological, geographical and recreational diversity you have with the mountains. I don't see how a view of the ocean can compare with the view of the Rockies from the top of Pikes Peak...granted that's a narrow comparison, but I can only speak from my own experience.

Even living in Austin now, 3 hours from the coast seems plenty close...there is still plenty of natural beauty around and the lakes, rivers and cold springs are plenty of water to satisfy me. I would be open to living on the coast but have no pre-existing desire to.
But isn't that one of the reasons Texans often prefer Austin over Dallas or SA? The immediate access to even relatively small Lake Travis and the CO river?
I also thought Austin was farther from the coast, at least from say, Padre Island. I am not sure how traffic pans out there.
The view of mountains (esp rockies) is certainly compensation from being out on the plains with no water OR mountains.
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Old 03-04-2012, 01:37 PM
 
Location: OH
364 posts, read 571,659 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ram2 View Post
Rivers are not the same as a large lake with blue water. There are lighthouses all over the Great Lakes.
Really???

But anyway, I assume you're in Michigan. Michigan does have some very nice scenery, especially on it's west coast. I was actually very surprised as certain parts of the shores of western Michigan reminded me of the eastern shore of Maryland. However, cities on the Great Lakes do not feel remotely close to a city on the ocean. Cities such as Baltimore, NYC, and Boston were greatly influenced by the ocean in the way they were built. In many Great Lakes cities, the large body of water they border can go largely unnoticed since they lack the estuaries, bays, and sounds that coastal cities have.
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Old 03-04-2012, 04:40 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Wahl_Wrighter View Post
Really???

But anyway, I assume you're in Michigan. Michigan does have some very nice scenery, especially on it's west coast. I was actually very surprised as certain parts of the shores of western Michigan reminded me of the eastern shore of Maryland. However, cities on the Great Lakes do not feel remotely close to a city on the ocean. Cities such as Baltimore, NYC, and Boston were greatly influenced by the ocean in the way they were built. In many Great Lakes cities, the large body of water they border can go largely unnoticed since they lack the estuaries, bays, and sounds that coastal cities have.


And why would I want to deal with the hustle and bustle of a big city on a large body of water? Why do you think so many Chicagolanders escape to the west coast of Michigan every weekend? Why do you think people escape to the quiet of a house or cottage on a lake?
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Old 03-04-2012, 04:44 PM
 
6,127 posts, read 6,443,422 times
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I guess I don't understand the claustrophobia BS everyone spouts about landlocked areas. How can I feel claustrophobic when I can get in my car and drive 1000 miles in any direction? I can go outside and look up in the huge sky and actually breathe and not have tons of people living right on top of me.

I have zero desire to live by an ocean or the Great Lakes. It's way too expensive and there are too many effing people, just waiting to annoy the crap out of me. Plus, many areas are humid and don't have the weather I like (if I'm going to deal with humidity, I want to be in Tornado Alley).

I am glad that so many people are ignorant of how nice landlocked areas can be. It keeps the riffraff out.
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Old 03-04-2012, 05:22 PM
 
Location: Bellingham, WA
9,745 posts, read 14,177,403 times
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Like I said, I can't explain the feeling of claustrophobia I experienced, but I know it was there. I imagine it's not actually claustrophobia, that's just the only word I can think of that describes the feeling. Obviously not everyone is going to experience the same thing. Also, I live by a great body of water and I don't have a ton of people right on top of me, but I still have access to all the amenities I want within walking distance.
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Old 03-04-2012, 05:34 PM
 
Location: roaming gnome
12,391 posts, read 24,555,922 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TheBeagleLady View Post
I guess I don't understand the claustrophobia BS everyone spouts about landlocked areas. How can I feel claustrophobic when I can get in my car and drive 1000 miles in any direction? I can go outside and look up in the huge sky and actually breathe and not have tons of people living right on top of me.

I have zero desire to live by an ocean or the Great Lakes. It's way too expensive and there are too many effing people, just waiting to annoy the crap out of me. Plus, many areas are humid and don't have the weather I like (if I'm going to deal with humidity, I want to be in Tornado Alley).

I am glad that so many people are ignorant of how nice landlocked areas can be. It keeps the riffraff out.
You actually sound kind of envious or something, otherwise why would you use all the bolded terms? It is one thing to not understand, it is another to be hostile about other people and how they feel...
Perhaps a nice ocean breeze would make you more relaxed?
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