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Old 04-10-2012, 11:28 AM
 
Location: IN
20,849 posts, read 35,952,730 times
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Analysis of rural county population densities:

Great Lakes (Midwest)
Michigan: Average population density for rural counties: 36.9
Ohio: Average population density for rural counties: 61.1
Wisconsin: Average population density for rural counties: 30.0
Illinois: Average population density for rural counties: 34.8
Indiana: Average population density for rural counties 51.3
Minnesota: Average population density for rural counties: 18.2
Iowa: Average population density for rural counties: 23.1
Missouri: Average population density for rural counties: 22.8

Great Plains (West/Midwest)
North Dakota: Average population density for rural counties: 4.0
South Dakota: Average population density for rural counties: 4.8
Nebraska: Average population density for rural counties: 8.1
Kansas: Average population density for rural counties: 8.1
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Old 04-10-2012, 12:49 PM
 
Location: IN
20,849 posts, read 35,952,730 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TexasReb View Post
Good point from your perspective, and really, it is the point of contension here. I live in North Texas, my ex (my kid's mother) is from Kansas, and her family lives there, so I have been up there many times (and always enjoyed it, far as that goes).

While I agree with you that the geographical/topographical features contain many similarities (as does the weather! LOL)? What you call the "sliver" of "southern atmosphere" is -- to me -- not only not a sliver, but the most important feature of all, when it comes to seperating the pairs (hey, pretty much along the lines of the Big 12 SOUTH and NORTH divisions! LOL).

I know personal experience in and of itself is not a good indicator of what is or isn't....but my own was that there seemed very little in common between Texas and most of Oklahoma, and that of the northern plains states.

The accent was perhaps the most noteable feature, and the general absence of Southern Baptist churches. Even the history was much different in the way it was presented. For instance -- my ex-father in law being a history buff as well, he would often take me out to various locations, including courthouses and going thru old cemeteries. GAR (Grand Old Army...Union) was unquestionably the almost exclusive feature on the headstone and monuments up there. Whereas in Texas? They are of the same ratio...except it is UCV (United Confederate Veterans) down here...

And also, of course, it is a fact that most of those in the northern plains states overwhelmingly self-identify with the Midwest....whereas -- by at least the same majorities -- Texans and Oklahomans clearly claim a Southern identity.
I think the biggest difference in the Midwest is from East to West. In the East rural counties have much higher population densities due to a more diverse economy that included manufacturing. In the West the economy was almost entirely agriculturally based and more isolated from markets- hince the lower population density overall.
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Old 04-10-2012, 01:28 PM
 
Location: Jefferson City 4 days a week, St. Louis 3 days a week
2,709 posts, read 4,228,729 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GraniteStater View Post
I think the biggest difference in the Midwest is from East to West. In the East rural counties have much higher population densities due to a more diverse economy that included manufacturing. In the West the economy was almost entirely agriculturally based and more isolated from markets- hince the lower population density overall.
Crops also are a bigger variance from east to west than from north to south. Wheat is more predominant in the Plains states, plus irrigation is required for the soil to be suitable for agriculture. Not the case with the Great Lakes states you listed...corn and soybeans are the most dominant crops in these regions, although Nebraska likely yields just as much corn as Illinois and Iowa...I've never seen cornfields as large as the ones I saw in Nebraska.
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Old 04-10-2012, 02:24 PM
 
Location: IN
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Quote:
Originally Posted by stlouisan View Post
Crops also are a bigger variance from east to west than from north to south. Wheat is more predominant in the Plains states, plus irrigation is required for the soil to be suitable for agriculture. Not the case with the Great Lakes states you listed...corn and soybeans are the most dominant crops in these regions, although Nebraska likely yields just as much corn as Illinois and Iowa...I've never seen cornfields as large as the ones I saw in Nebraska.
Ya, mass production agriculture. That is a different topic for discussion. I prefer my foods local and organic when possible.
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Old 04-10-2012, 07:39 PM
 
Location: OKIE-Ville
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CookieSkoon View Post
And I'm the ghost who pops in at random.

Tex said "off the beaten path." This is an elusive truth to most people. Too many generalize a region by its urban circles.

Happens all across the nation. By and large folks seem to forget, or perhaps ignore, that cities are tight and self contained atmospheres. They say little to nothing about the surrounding country side and small towns (not counting the obvious suburbs).

Once you leave their immediate influence things tend to change. And especially once you remove yourself from the vaster circle of influence, things change drastically. Even within MSA boundaries.
Excellent insights here.

Why this is such a hard truth for many to grasp is beyond me.
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Old 04-10-2012, 07:40 PM
 
Location: OKIE-Ville
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Quote:
Originally Posted by stlouisan View Post
the three musketeers...we are
all for one and one for all!
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Old 04-10-2012, 07:44 PM
 
Location: South Dakota
434 posts, read 585,232 times
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The Encyclopedia of the Great Plains would help you to define that region and separate it from the rest of the Midwest.
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Old 04-10-2012, 07:47 PM
 
Location: Philaburbia
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Quote:
Originally Posted by AuburnAL View Post
Where is the Midwest?
It's right there where we left it.
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Old 04-10-2012, 08:15 PM
 
5,859 posts, read 14,049,839 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GraniteStater View Post
Google streetview. Eg: 2900 block N Holton, Milwaukee. Notice the stoplight housing is yelow in color, hence the term "yellow plate" stoplight. Yellow plate stoplights are more common in the eastern part of the US as well as in more rural locations. If you go further west to Minneapolis or Des Moines they have no yellow plate stoplights. They are all black plate stoplights.
Had no idea, I never noticed this. (and I thought I was a geek ) You're right, I looked around here in St Paul and all of the stoplights I saw were "black plate". BTW, the intersection you asked me to Google was less than 1/2 mile from my apartment when I lived in Milwaukee a couple decades ago. Seeing that corner brought back memories.
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Old 04-10-2012, 08:34 PM
 
Location: IN
20,849 posts, read 35,952,730 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ben Around View Post
Had no idea, I never noticed this. (and I thought I was a geek ) You're right, I looked around here in St Paul and all of the stoplights I saw were "black plate". BTW, the intersection you asked me to Google was less than 1/2 mile from my apartment when I lived in Milwaukee a couple decades ago. Seeing that corner brought back memories.
Wow, I just picked a very random google streetview as well Yes, I tend to focus on extreme details like stoplights that most people wouldn't think of when examining a cityscape.
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