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Old 03-05-2012, 01:07 PM
 
Location: Jefferson City 4 days a week, St. Louis 3 days a week
2,709 posts, read 4,233,455 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ram2 View Post
Baltimore is a rust belt city that lost all of it's manufacturing.
Baltimore doesn't really have a lot of cultural ties to the Midwest...it has more in common with Philadelphia and D.C. Baltimore aside, I would still say that most of the Northeast didn't experience the type of economic devastation that the Midwest did. While it's true that the Bos-Wash corridor certainly was greatly impacted by the loss of manufacturing, they weren't dependent on it to the degree much of the Midwest was, and seemed to weather it better. And I certainly can't think of many big cities in the the Northeast that experienced the type of long-term decline that Detroit, Cleveland, or St. Louis experienced. Pittsburgh, Buffalo, Erie, and Rochester did, but these cities really have much more in common culturally with Cleveland than with Boston, NYC, or Philly.

Last edited by stlouisan; 03-05-2012 at 01:43 PM..
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Old 03-05-2012, 01:55 PM
 
Location: Jefferson City 4 days a week, St. Louis 3 days a week
2,709 posts, read 4,233,455 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ram2 View Post
Baltimore is a rust belt city that lost all of it's manufacturing.
Baltimore was not solely dependent on manufacturing though...it is still one of the most important seaport cities...not to mention it has revived many of the areas that once were industrial...the Inner Harbor in particular. Boston, New York, and Philadelphia definitely did not experience the long term decline that Cleveland and Detroit have. The Northeast seems to have a much greater tourist industry and many of its cities being seaports have probably helped minimize the effects of it to a greater extent.

And there certainly is no question at least in my mind that the Midwest and Northeast are distinctly different from each other, particularly with regards to the Bos-Wash corridor.
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Old 03-31-2012, 09:03 AM
 
Location: Franklin, Tennessee
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southern missouri has next to NOTHING in common with the north or the midwest...it's 120% southern and we're proud to include our friends up there as part of dixie....when you start getting to central missouri and above, sorry, but y'all are yankees lol
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Old 03-31-2012, 09:20 AM
 
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Rustbelt type cities are really only found in the northeast/great lakes. While much of the northeast has gentrified and recovered due in part to their importance (even the bronx has gentrified considerably the past 10 years), much of the great lakes continues to struggle especially since most people are moving out west and south than the great lakes. Real estate is dirt cheap and no one is bothering to improve some of the crumbling cities.

All in all, when I lived in California, to us anything midwest was east of the pacific bordering states and anything west of the atlantic bordering states. So you got states like Idaho, Montana as well as Pennsylvania (except Philly) being considered the 'midwest.' Having also lived in Michigan, the definition changed to be synonymous with the great lakes. Ohio, Indiana, Michigan, Illinois, and Wisconsin are all 'midwest' where Minnesota, Iowa, and especially ND, SD, Iowa, Kansas and Nebraska where something else entirely. Culturally speaking, the only difference is that the great lakes are far more urban and blue collar than the plains states but is rural Michigan all that much different from Minnesota or even ND? I don't think so.....
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Old 03-31-2012, 09:24 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by stlouisan View Post
Baltimore was not solely dependent on manufacturing though...it is still one of the most important seaport cities...not to mention it has revived many of the areas that once were industrial...the Inner Harbor in particular. Boston, New York, and Philadelphia definitely did not experience the long term decline that Cleveland and Detroit have. The Northeast seems to have a much greater tourist industry and many of its cities being seaports have probably helped minimize the effects of it to a greater extent.

And there certainly is no question at least in my mind that the Midwest and Northeast are distinctly different from each other, particularly with regards to the Bos-Wash corridor.
Yeah they did until the 90s. NYC was declining all throughout the 70s and 80s. Much of it did look like your stereotypical rustbelt city (like Detroit, Cleveland, south Chicago etc) but something changed around the 90s. The fact of the matter is NYC was always too valuable to allow the real estate to degrade, after a critical point investors would buy up large portions of the struggling sections of the city, flip them, and make hand over hand money. That is a lot harder for places like Detroit which only had the auto industry going for them.
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Old 03-31-2012, 09:48 AM
 
Location: Midtown Omaha
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My rough definition.

Untitled - Google Maps

I know a lot don't include Pittsburgh, but I am. Lincoln, NE on the far western border.
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Old 03-31-2012, 09:58 AM
 
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It's kinda funny but you can get a sense where you spent most of your life by the way you classify regions. For example, when I lived in Mississippi no one there considered Kentucky to be part of the south but rather the midwest. But in Michigan, Kentucky is the first southern state you hit. The fact you left out Kentucky tells me you spent most of your life north of the mason dixon line. By including Minnesota and parts of the plain states with the midwest it tells me you spent at least some of your time west of the mississippi.
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Old 03-31-2012, 10:27 AM
 
Location: Midtown Omaha
1,225 posts, read 1,817,910 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by PosterExtraordinaire View Post
It's kinda funny but you can get a sense where you spent most of your life by the way you classify regions. For example, when I lived in Mississippi no one there considered Kentucky to be part of the south but rather the midwest. But in Michigan, Kentucky is the first southern state you hit. The fact you left out Kentucky tells me you spent most of your life north of the mason dixon line. By including Minnesota and parts of the plain states with the midwest it tells me you spent at least some of your time west of the mississippi.
I am sure it has a ton to do with where you grew up and live and spent most of your life.

I have only visited east of the Mississippi, heck I live west of the Missouri now.

My western definition comes from visiting family in western and central Nebraska when I was younger. The cities and towns out there have very little in common to the cities and towns in the eastern third of the state. For me heading east I see a lot more similarities with Omaha than I do heading west. Thats why I include it.
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Old 03-31-2012, 11:08 AM
 
Location: plano
6,584 posts, read 8,118,827 times
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I grew up in Southern Oklahoma and considered myself midwestern then not southern or western. I still feel that way about Oklahoma and Dallas to me feels as much midwestern as south or west. My definition of midwestern are down to earth people who dont mind the bi coastals referring to it as flyover country. They have no southern accent and tend to be down to earth types. Glitz and glamour arent part of their make up.. .come to thnk of it maybe that does excluded DFW<G>. Their weather is windy, with farming and manufacturing jobs s while ago. I dont consider Houston midwestern its more gulf coastal than midwestern to me which defines the weather and humidity in Houston and other gulf coast towns. Caveat, these categories are my own so your mpg may differ.
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Old 03-31-2012, 01:39 PM
 
Location: Jefferson City 4 days a week, St. Louis 3 days a week
2,709 posts, read 4,233,455 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by southernbythegraceofgod View Post
southern missouri has next to NOTHING in common with the north or the midwest...it's 120% southern and we're proud to include our friends up there as part of dixie....when you start getting to central missouri and above, sorry, but y'all are yankees lol
Have to disagree to a point. It depends on where you are in southern Missouri...if you're talking about a place like Sikeston, then 120% southern I agree is the rule...in general, southern Missouri has a bipolar cultural identity of both Midwest and South. So do parts of Southern Illinois, Southern Indiana, and Southeast Ohio. A line from West plains to Poplar Bluff to Sikeston on down is about where I'd say you get the 120% southern identity.
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