U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Happy Halloween!
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > General U.S.
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 1.5 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
Jump to a detailed profile or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Business Search - 14 Million verified businesses
Search for:  near: 
 
 
Old 05-14-2012, 03:52 AM
 
Location: Lansing Metro
2,726 posts, read 2,855,592 times
Reputation: 3428
Quote:
Originally Posted by CinSonic View Post
Winter in Chicago sucks. They only get like 30 inches of snow and the rest of the winter its either absolutely freezing with temps around 10F or lots of rain and mixed precipitation. Now Minnesota might fit your bill better. They get real snow up there except the temps are probably colder. Flagstaff is the best of both worlds. Winter gets 100 inches but its not to cold and summers are gorgous around 80-85F

I agree. Our winters up here in Michigan are actually warmer than Chicago, with more snow. Whenever I travel down to Chicago in the winter, I freeze my butt off! There is something about 10 degree weather with zero snow cover and concrete everywhere that makes winter almost unbearable in Chicago. I would much rather have a snowy cloudy Michigan winter.
Quick reply to this message

 
Old 05-14-2012, 07:35 AM
 
Location: Laurentia
5,072 posts, read 2,644,315 times
Reputation: 1792
Quote:
Originally Posted by stlouisan View Post
lol, Minneapolis does NOT average 80 degrees during any month of the year. the lower to mid-70s is more like it if we are talking average temperatures.
My mistake. I was referring to summer highs. Besides, Minneapolis averages 60F or higher for lows. That's certainly not "cool" by any reasonable standard. Besides, the cultural perception of the "pleasant 70-degree day" is based on high temperatures, and the daily mean is around 60F.

Quote:
And 80 degrees is not hot and summer-like..it's considered very pleasant and tolerable by anyone who has ever experienced a real summer. Those summers are going to be too cool if the poster is looking for a hot summer. And temperatures in Minneapolis usually never top the mid-80s...it is almost never unbearably hot and humid.
I've been and lived in places that have a real summer. I've done my time in the heat; I probably have more experience with heat than you have in Saint Louis. 80F is hot and summer-like, and it is certainly good, hot weather to have a barbeque, which is another thing the OP mentioned. The OP was not looking for a place that is unbearably hot and humid, so if the Twin Cities average in the low 80's with warm nights, and "never get unbearably hot and humid", wouldn't that be a good choice?

Quote:
And you base your figures squarely on snowfall...that's not all that comprises a severe winter. St. Louis gets freezing, sleet, and does frequently get well below 32 degrees, especially in January. Are our winters severe? No. But they are moderate and capable of being severe.
No, that isn't all that comprises a severe winter. Cold and wind also comprise a severe winter. Neither Chicago nor Saint Louis is windy, and even if they were average high temperatures that never drop below freezing (or even below 40F!) are a sick joke if you're looking for a severe winter. Chicago and Saint Louis have neither cold temperatures, cold wind chills, or a lot of snow. They may as well be wiped from the page of time to all the good they'll do to one who wants a lot of snow in winter. How does a snowy winter comport with a place that rarely gets enough for skiing and where the snow nearly always melts off within a week, most often accompanied with rain?

Quote:
And once again, you want to call us morons...all we are saying is that the cities we suggested come the closest to giving both really hot summers and really cold winters.
You're trying to steer the OP into a place he'll most likely hate living in, while thinking that a place that can barely manage to maintain snow cover for a week, let alone three months, has snowy winters. The description of "moron" is applicable here.

Quote:
If you think Minneapolis' summers are so hot and unbearable, you should pack up and move to Yellowknife in Northern Canada.
No. Whitehorse would be a better choice, if we're looking in Northern Canada . I certainly wouldn't want to ask you where to move, if you suggest that places like Saint Louis have snowy and severe winters. What would you consider a normal winter? And what would you label a winter like what Winnipeg or Thompson gets, if Chicago already is "severe"? I have a hunch that your baseline for a normal winter is a winter where it's mild/warm and raining all the time, which is not winter.

Really, what you call a "severe winter" is what I call the mild side of "ordinary winter". Perhaps you can follow this man's example:

Quote:
Originally Posted by MB8abovetherim View Post
If you want hot summers and snowy winters I suggest California, Utah, Colorado, Arizona or even New Mexico. Of those places listed, California would be the best as it has the best combination of hot/snowy places.

For starters the Eastern Sierras get very warm in the summer, 80+ is very common. And winters see 100-250 inches of snow depending on your elevation and distance from the crest of the Sierras. The best example would be Mammoth Lakes, 211 inches of snow per year, average July high temp of 78 and over 300 days of sunshine...but it's pretty isolated.

Truckee, CA on I-80. About an hour and a half from San Francisco, 45 minutes from Reno. 200 Inches of snow, and an average July high temp of 83F.

Also, South Lake Tahoe, CA gets into the 90's in the summer time and picks up more than 200 inches of snow as well.

If that's not snowy enough, Serene Lakes/Norden/Soda Springs, CA about 15 minutes away from Truckee on the western side of Donner Pass gets 400 + Inches of snow (March snowpacks there routinely exceed 20 feet) and the same warm California sunshine. Summers are a tad cooler, do to altitude but still quite warm and even hot on occasion.

Alta, Utah is great as well. Hot, dry summers with 500 inches of snow in the winter time to boot. And not to far from SLC.

Colorado is similar, though you aren't gonna see as much snow. Washington and Oregon get the most snow but are too cold/wet.
Bravo for actually trying to find a place that meets the OP's criteria, instead of trying to project your own misconceptions .
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-14-2012, 01:39 PM
 
5,243 posts, read 4,345,964 times
Reputation: 4579
I think that the OP is looking for a location with a great deal of moisture, and all 4 seasons, so I would suggest perhaps upstate NY, Michigan, maybe sections of New England. Summers are typically warm with quite a bit of rainfall, with occasional stretches of higher humidity. The winters are cold and quite snowy, especially across the Snow Belt of upstate NY.

The BBQ need is fairly common; you can find this virtually anywhere..
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-14-2012, 07:04 PM
 
Location: Jefferson City 4 days a week, St. Louis 3 days a week
2,713 posts, read 2,113,629 times
Reputation: 890
Quote:
Originally Posted by Patricius Maximus View Post
My mistake. I was referring to summer highs. Besides, Minneapolis averages 60F or higher for lows. That's certainly not "cool" by any reasonable standard. Besides, the cultural perception of the "pleasant 70-degree day" is based on high temperatures, and the daily mean is around 60F.



I've been and lived in places that have a real summer. I've done my time in the heat; I probably have more experience with heat than you have in Saint Louis. 80F is hot and summer-like, and it is certainly good, hot weather to have a barbeque, which is another thing the OP mentioned. The OP was not looking for a place that is unbearably hot and humid, so if the Twin Cities average in the low 80's with warm nights, and "never get unbearably hot and humid", wouldn't that be a good choice?

No, that isn't all that comprises a severe winter. Cold and wind also comprise a severe winter. Neither Chicago nor Saint Louis is windy, and even if they were average high temperatures that never drop below freezing (or even below 40F!) are a sick joke if you're looking for a severe winter. Chicago and Saint Louis have neither cold temperatures, cold wind chills, or a lot of snow. They may as well be wiped from the page of time to all the good they'll do to one who wants a lot of snow in winter. How does a snowy winter comport with a place that rarely gets enough for skiing and where the snow nearly always melts off within a week, most often accompanied with rain?

You're trying to steer the OP into a place he'll most likely hate living in, while thinking that a place that can barely manage to maintain snow cover for a week, let alone three months, has snowy winters. The description of "moron" is applicable here.

No. Whitehorse would be a better choice, if we're looking in Northern Canada . I certainly wouldn't want to ask you where to move, if you suggest that places like Saint Louis have snowy and severe winters. What would you consider a normal winter? And what would you label a winter like what Winnipeg or Thompson gets, if Chicago already is "severe"? I have a hunch that your baseline for a normal winter is a winter where it's mild/warm and raining all the time, which is not winter.

Really, what you call a "severe winter" is what I call the mild side of "ordinary winter". Perhaps you can follow this man's example:



Bravo for actually trying to find a place that meets the OP's criteria, instead of trying to project your own misconceptions .
LMAO!!! You crack me up. First you accuse me of trying to mislead the OP. The OP asked for a place that gets hot summers and cold winters. I'm not miserable living here, so I doubt he would be. You think Chicago doesn't get cold in the winter...and you think St. Louis doesn't get hot in the summer or cold in the winter? As far as heat goes, I know what heat is, and I also know what cold and snowy is. And yes, St. Louis can be very snowy. Two years ago we had 36 inches of snow...and several winters before that we had 32 inches. In between we had around 20 inches...snowy is all relative, but that's a respectable amount of snow, and a winter to a much greater degree than Minneapolis. You must be living in Canada in the winter and Mexico in the summer. As far as a normal winter, there's no way of standardizing that. There are many different types of climates and winters. The OP never suggested what his tolerance of hot is..most people define a hot summer as being in the upper 80s to mid-90s and humid. Minneapolis doesn't get hot in the summer. Sorry. It barely qualifies for a summer most of the time. I'm assuming "Dirty Harry" is going to show up to defend you, so good luck to the two of you and your dilusional perceptions of weather. Chicago's winters are utterly bone-chilling and normally snowy in excess of 30 inches, and the snow stays on the ground.

You seem to think that the northernmost sections of the United States get all four seasons in their fullest...just not true.
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-14-2012, 09:27 PM
 
Location: Cleveland
4,663 posts, read 3,426,061 times
Reputation: 2519
Quote:
Originally Posted by stlouisan View Post
I beg to differ. Freezing rain, sleet, and snow are all equally as likely and common...and black ice is a common problem.

lol, Minneapolis does NOT average 80 degrees during any month of the year. the lower to mid-70s is more like it if we are talking average temperatures. And 80 degrees is not hot and summer-like..it's considered very pleasant and tolerable by anyone who has ever experienced a real summer. Those summers are going to be too cool if the poster is looking for a hot summer. And temperatures in Minneapolis usually never top the mid-80s...it is almost never unbearably hot and humid.

And you base your figures squarely on snowfall...that's not all that comprises a severe winter. St. Louis gets freezing, sleet, and does frequently get well below 32 degrees, especially in January. Are our winters severe? No. But they are moderate and capable of being severe. They are severe much more often than Minneapolis' summers are unbearably hot and humid.

And once again, you want to call us morons...all we are saying is that the cities we suggested come the closest to giving both really hot summers and really cold winters.

If you think Minneapolis' summers are so hot and unbearable, you should pack up and move to Yellowknife in Northern Canada.
The avg. high in July the past 10 years has been 86.....woops! How many days is that -- 31? It averages over 85 probably closer to 50-60 days per summer in Minneapolis. It can get unbearably hot (like St. Louis) a few times a year. Last year the hottest day had a heat index of 122 (high temp 103 degrees)......is that hot?

St. Louis does not get as cold as Mineapolis can get hot, so you have no basis for your argument here. You just have NO CLUE what you are talking about and, like so many C-D posters, are talking 100% out of their a$$e$! Now I'm not saying Minneapolis is super hot by any means, but it can and does get quite hot there in the summertime, with 15-20 90+ degree highs a year and 100+ every other year or so (which pales in comparison to places like Dallas, but we're not talking about Dallas). It also can and DOES get quite humid there. Dewpoints over 65 are usually considered uncomfortably humid, and over 75 oppressive. I'd be willing to bet that Minneapolis highest dewpoint last year (83) was higher than St. Louis'.......just a guess, but the point is that it gets humid and hot, not that it's moreso than St. Louis.

Look at stats before you speak, since ALL of this data is available here:

Preliminary Local Climatological Data - Minneapolis/St. Paul, MN
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-14-2012, 09:41 PM
 
Location: Cleveland
4,663 posts, read 3,426,061 times
Reputation: 2519
Quote:
Originally Posted by stlouisan View Post


LMAO!!! You crack me up. First you accuse me of trying to mislead the OP. The OP asked for a place that gets hot summers and cold winters. I'm not miserable living here, so I doubt he would be. You think Chicago doesn't get cold in the winter...and you think St. Louis doesn't get hot in the summer or cold in the winter? As far as heat goes, I know what heat is, and I also know what cold and snowy is. And yes, St. Louis can be very snowy. Two years ago we had 36 inches of snow...and several winters before that we had 32 inches. In between we had around 20 inches...snowy is all relative, but that's a respectable amount of snow, and a winter to a much greater degree than Minneapolis. You must be living in Canada in the winter and Mexico in the summer. As far as a normal winter, there's no way of standardizing that. There are many different types of climates and winters. The OP never suggested what his tolerance of hot is..most people define a hot summer as being in the upper 80s to mid-90s and humid. Minneapolis doesn't get hot in the summer. Sorry. It barely qualifies for a summer most of the time. I'm assuming "Dirty Harry" is going to show up to defend you, so good luck to the two of you and your dilusional perceptions of weather. Chicago's winters are utterly bone-chilling and normally snowy in excess of 30 inches, and the snow stays on the ground.

You seem to think that the northernmost sections of the United States get all four seasons in their fullest...just not true.

So according to your rant, Chicago, Minneapolis-St. Paul, Detroit, New York City, Philadelphia, Boston, Pittsburgh, Cleveland, Columbus, Seattle, Portland, San Diego, San Francisco, Los Angeles, Milwaukee and Indianapolis do not have "summers" according to your logic....because ALL of them have summer highs in the low-mid 80's OR LOWER, with FEW exceptions. You just alienated about 50% of the country -- congrats!

And the previous bolded statement is the most shocking of all -- unless I don't understand your statement -- you are saying that St. Louis has "winter to a much greater degree than" Minneapolis???? Are you joking?!?!? If that's the case you just lost all your credibility.

The ONLY place in this country that gets the most variation in temps is essentially North and South Dakota, and then it spreads out from there. Minneapolis and Minnesota can easily be regarded as one of the most extreme weather cities in the country based on temps alone: lows well below zero, and highs over 100 in the same calander year. It has the largest variation from high to low for major cities in the U.S. And it's usually NOT considered a great aspect of Minneapolis -- it's a fact that we all deal with and often get criticism for and then people like you come along and state not only that your city is more extreme, but that Minneapolis is NOT as extreme! St. Loius' avg. July high is what, 89 degrees? Minneapolis (the past 10 years) is 86. The difference is 3 degrees. Minneapolis avg. January high is 22, St. Louis is 40, and there is never a chance to skate or sled outside in natural snow/ice like you can in Minnesota (which is the silver lining in the cold-a$$ weather). Do you see the difference?

P.S. it's warmer in Minneapolis RIGHT NOW than it is in St. Louis (74 vs. 63 degrees).
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-14-2012, 09:47 PM
NCN
 
14,084 posts, read 12,018,864 times
Reputation: 16159
Southern mountain areas are snowy in the Winter and pretty warm in Summer.

http://www.city-data.com/county/Ashe_County-NC.html

http://www.city-data.com/county/Carroll_County-VA.html

Last edited by NCN; 05-14-2012 at 10:04 PM..
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-14-2012, 10:05 PM
 
Location: Cleveland
4,663 posts, read 3,426,061 times
Reputation: 2519
Quote:
Originally Posted by NCN View Post
Southern mountain areas are snowy in the Winter and pretty warm in Summer.

http://www.city-data.com/county/Ashe_County-NC.html
Okay, I think the debate is now totally ridiculous and everyone is touting their city as a place with "cold/snowy winters" and "hot summers". Throw in Seatte while we're at it....if it hasn't already been suggested!

OP, good luck with your search and no matter where you end up landing, hopefully you find a place that works for you (weather and all).
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-15-2012, 12:01 PM
 
Location: NE TN~ TriCities
5,227 posts, read 6,431,001 times
Reputation: 7334
Snowy is snowy, does it make a difference how much as long as there is enough to sled, ski, snowmobile in? A few more inches of snow doesn't make one place better than another.
Same with summer, as long as it's hot enough to be comfortable swimming and running around in a bathing suit all day who cares if one place is 5 or 10 degrees warmer than another.
I seriously doubt the OP was looking for extremes at either end...
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-16-2012, 02:57 AM
 
Location: St. Louis, MO
2,303 posts, read 1,947,260 times
Reputation: 2501
Have we even heard from the OP, Spiffy lately, about what their personal temperature requirements are?
Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


 
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:
Over $84,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > General U.S.

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2014, Advameg, Inc.

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25 - Top