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Old 05-17-2012, 04:51 PM
 
Location: Anchorage Suburbanites and part time Willowbillies
1,709 posts, read 1,531,211 times
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Fairbanks Alaska
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Old 05-19-2012, 05:42 PM
 
Location: The heart of Cascadia
1,328 posts, read 2,649,824 times
Reputation: 815
Wow um. Most of the United States would offer this. With the exception of:

Most of California, aside from the mountainous and plateau parts which do have cold snowy winters

Western Oregon and Western Washington at low elevations. A little bit of snow but not much, a little bit of heat but not much. The summer is hotter than the winter is cold, but overall it is still jacket weather 8 months out of the year, and if you count night time 11 months out of the year.

Southern Arizona and the far south of NM do not even get cold in the winter, let alone snowy. Northern AZ and most of NM however have all four seasons. The southern tip of Nevada and extreme SW Utah also don't have a cold winter.

East of the Rockies, anywhere above 32N or so will have snow in the winter, above 40N and you have truly cold long winters. It still gets hot in the summer until you get up to about 44/45N then it's more just 'warm' summers.
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Old 05-19-2012, 07:26 PM
 
Location: Jefferson City 4 days a week, St. Louis 3 days a week
2,709 posts, read 4,228,729 times
Reputation: 998
Quote:
Originally Posted by callmemaybe View Post
Wow um. Most of the United States would offer this. With the exception of:

Most of California, aside from the mountainous and plateau parts which do have cold snowy winters

Western Oregon and Western Washington at low elevations. A little bit of snow but not much, a little bit of heat but not much. The summer is hotter than the winter is cold, but overall it is still jacket weather 8 months out of the year, and if you count night time 11 months out of the year.

Southern Arizona and the far south of NM do not even get cold in the winter, let alone snowy. Northern AZ and most of NM however have all four seasons. The southern tip of Nevada and extreme SW Utah also don't have a cold winter.

East of the Rockies, anywhere above 32N or so will have snow in the winter, above 40N and you have truly cold long winters. It still gets hot in the summer until you get up to about 44/45N then it's more just 'warm' summers.
Umm..you completely forget about the states that border the Gulf of Mexico.
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Old 05-20-2012, 05:15 PM
 
Location: The heart of Cascadia
1,328 posts, read 2,649,824 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by stlouisan View Post
Umm..you completely forget about the states that border the Gulf of Mexico.
No I didn't - I said anything south of 32N doesn't have 4 seasons.
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Old 05-23-2012, 01:23 PM
 
Location: Jefferson City 4 days a week, St. Louis 3 days a week
2,709 posts, read 4,228,729 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by callmemaybe View Post
No I didn't - I said anything south of 32N doesn't have 4 seasons.
Ahhh ok, sorry I misread you.
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Old 05-23-2012, 02:47 PM
 
160 posts, read 335,204 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by spiffytools View Post
You are right, hot is relativ.
I think, anything above 80 or 85 I would consider hot.
-This is the OP, so you all can stop calling people morons for saying that places that average over 80 in summer are "hot". In this case, they are.
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Old 05-31-2012, 12:08 AM
 
Location: Battle Creek, MI
494 posts, read 673,450 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by stlouisan View Post


LMAO!!! You crack me up. First you accuse me of trying to mislead the OP. The OP asked for a place that gets hot summers and cold winters. I'm not miserable living here, so I doubt he would be. You think Chicago doesn't get cold in the winter...and you think St. Louis doesn't get hot in the summer or cold in the winter? As far as heat goes, I know what heat is, and I also know what cold and snowy is. And yes, St. Louis can be very snowy. Two years ago we had 36 inches of snow...and several winters before that we had 32 inches. In between we had around 20 inches...snowy is all relative, but that's a respectable amount of snow, and a winter to a much greater degree than Minneapolis. You must be living in Canada in the winter and Mexico in the summer. As far as a normal winter, there's no way of standardizing that. There are many different types of climates and winters. The OP never suggested what his tolerance of hot is..most people define a hot summer as being in the upper 80s to mid-90s and humid. Minneapolis doesn't get hot in the summer. Sorry. It barely qualifies for a summer most of the time. I'm assuming "Dirty Harry" is going to show up to defend you, so good luck to the two of you and your dilusional perceptions of weather. Chicago's winters are utterly bone-chilling and normally snowy in excess of 30 inches, and the snow stays on the ground.

You seem to think that the northernmost sections of the United States get all four seasons in their fullest...just not true.
LOL @ Dirty Harry comment!

Sorry but again i do not consider a place that has a average temp of 40 or better for a high in winter much of a winter climate. But you keep on with the delusional thoughts on what you think is a real winter. Yeah St. Louis can get a real winter but they are not the norm.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Min-Chi-Cbus View Post
Most people when they mean hot summers mean summers like St. Louis, not like Minneapolis, although that can vary.

You have a point....if you say "hot summers" I don't think Minneapolis applies, but if you say "can get hot in the summer" then I think it applies. You could say the SAME thing about St. Louis though: "cold and snowy winters" vs. "It can get cold and snowy in the winter".


It's a well-known fact that the past 10 years have been considerably warmer everywhere due to global warming, and could easily be outliers from the norms

I used the 10 year average PRECISELY because it's been so much warmer lately, and to give the OP a better idea of the true current weather. The 10 year average July high is actually closer to 86 or 87, but I put down 85 because weather.com will say it's 84, and I figured that was a fair compromise. 85 isn't "hot" to most people, but if that's the average and the standard deviation is amongst the largest in the nation in terms of temperature extremes, that means the average summer sees highs as low as the upper 60's to low 70's when it rains, to the upper 90's and low 100's....and sometimes WITH high humidity (dewpoint is relavent when the temps are above 80 or so, I'd say)......there's almost nobody who wouldn't call that hot!

I'm not sure why you're so steamed....I never said I was an expert, or that I was smarter than scientists....I just backed up my words with data to ensure you that I was NOT talking out of my a$$. I don't have a thing against St. Louis, but if I remember correctly, YOU were the one who made the comment about Minneapolis' weather FIRST, and I responded with data and other rhetoric. Minneapolis is hot in the summer and cold/snowy in the winter almost the SAME as St. Louis is "hot in the summer and cold/snowy in the winter", with the emphasis on the latter for Minneapolis and the former for St. Louis.

Perhaps somewhere inbetween (like Des Moines OR Omaha) would be the perfect compromise for the OP???
Nice post. As someone else pointed out it is all relative. For one 80+ could be considered hot while another says it is warm.

Count me amongst those who has little use for heat and or temps much above 80. Have already had a few 90+ readings and it has sucked. Had enough of that when i lived in the mid atlantic ( DE/MD/VA ) back when.

Oh and yeah the other options ( Des Moines or Omaha ) are not bad picks. Get a decent amount of everything there and thus heat, cold, snow, severe weather, etc. Get all 4 seasons for sure. I think Interstate 80 is a very good starting point except in the higher elevations out west/CA.
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