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Old 04-24-2012, 11:35 PM
 
7,238 posts, read 10,890,436 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jimbo_1 View Post
You can add most Northeast cities in there too.
With the exception of Boston (which averages around 45" of snow per season), I wouldn't call the NE cities "snowy."

Other than a massive snowstorm that jacks up their seasonal totals, NYC, Philadelphia and DC can go through long periods of time without seeing any snow.

For example, Take this past winter. While Chicago and Detroit still managed to pick up 20-25" (which is actually NYC and Philadelphia's average seasonal snowfall) for their seasonal total (which for them is well below average), NYC has only picked up a whopping 7" (40% of which came from the freak October snowstorm, remainder of which came from a 4.3" storm in January, every other day this past witner tehre was NO snow recorded). Philadelphia meanwhile only recorded 4" total for the season.
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Old 04-24-2012, 11:49 PM
 
Location: Bronx, NY
5,515 posts, read 17,674,229 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 313Weather View Post
With the exception of Boston (which averages around 45" of snow per season), I wouldn't call the NE cities "snowy."

Other than a massive snowstorm that jacks up their seasonal totals, NYC, Philadelphia and DC can go through long periods of time without seeing any snow.

For example, Take this past winter. While Chicago and Detroit still managed to pick up 20-25" (which is actually NYC and Philadelphia's average seasonal snowfall) for their seasonal total (which for them is well below average), NYC has only picked up a whopping 7" (40% of which came from the freak October snowstorm, remainder of which came from a 4.3" storm in January, every other day this past witner tehre was NO snow recorded). Philadelphia meanwhile only recorded 4" total for the season.
This was a really warm winter. NYC averages a little over 2 feet of snow during winter. That's more than enough snow. Chicago doesn't get that much more snow than us.
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Old 04-24-2012, 11:57 PM
 
Location: New Orleans
797 posts, read 1,158,829 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 313Weather View Post
With the exception of Boston (which averages around 45" of snow per season), I wouldn't call the NE cities "snowy."

Other than a massive snowstorm that jacks up their seasonal totals, NYC, Philadelphia and DC can go through long periods of time without seeing any snow.

For example, Take this past winter. While Chicago and Detroit still managed to pick up 20-25" (which is actually NYC and Philadelphia's average seasonal snowfall) for their seasonal total (which for them is well below average), NYC has only picked up a whopping 7" (40% of which came from the freak October snowstorm, remainder of which came from a 4.3" storm in January, every other day this past witner tehre was NO snow recorded). Philadelphia meanwhile only recorded 4" total for the season.
The OP says he is sick of the rain/cold in England. I am sure he would get sick of a lot of snow, so he would probably like a break in the action like this past winter. I know people who loved this past winter because of how unusually warm it was with little snow. So it could actually be a plus if it happens once in a blue moon.
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Old 04-25-2012, 02:08 AM
 
Location: Battle Creek, MI
494 posts, read 672,999 times
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SW Michigan. Look up Grand Rapids or Kalamazoo etc. Both average well over 70 inches of snow a winter and both have decent warmth in summer. Plus you are not too far from Lake Michigan either which warms into the upper 70s ( even 80 on occasion ) during the summer. Both are decent size areas as well with plenty to do/shopping etc and you are not too far from Detroit/Chicago either. Thus you are not totally isolated. There is also other smaller towns nearby ( just to the west by 5 to 15 miles) which averages 90+ inches of snow from near/Just west of Kalamazoo on up towards Muskegon inland. The Lake basically guarantees you will see decent snow every winter via lake effect snow on the Michigan side of lake Michigan.
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Old 04-25-2012, 03:38 AM
 
Location: West Michigan
3,073 posts, read 5,447,005 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jimbo_1 View Post
The OP says he is sick of the rain/cold in England. I am sure he would get sick of a lot of snow, so he would probably like a break in the action like this past winter. I know people who loved this past winter because of how unusually warm it was with little snow. So it could actually be a plus if it happens once in a blue moon.
Not necessarily. As someone who lives in a place that gets plenty of snow, but also rainy days... snow and rain are completely different and do not have the same effect on the mood.

When I think of England, I think of dreary, drizzly days, where it rains enough to be a nuisance, but not enough to be an actual thunderstorm. This is the WORST kind of weather. I like thunderstorms, but drizzly, rainy days are the pits.

Snow, on the other hand, is exciting. It is not depressing. There is nothing more fun than getting a big snowfall and watching it pile up. (It helps if you aren't forced to drive in it).

The most depressing winter days are actually cold, gray, snowless days, also the times where it warms up and rains and the snow melts. That is the crappy weather that really makes people hate winter.
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Old 04-25-2012, 07:18 AM
 
Location: Victoria TX
42,663 posts, read 74,221,895 times
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Iowa, Nebraska, South Dakota.

In fact, South Dakota is the perfect American place to live, if you can stand the climate extremes and the lack of urban jobs, and you are an ideal candidate. If I were you, I'd be in South Dakota.

Although you don't get much light fluffy snow, it mostly comes in the form of blizzards. Summers can be outrageously hot (105F), but most summer days are perfectly delightful, with a few spectacular thunderstorms. Sioux Falls is the only "city" to speak of, and it's a very, very nice city. The towns are places where nobody locks their doors.
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Old 04-26-2012, 12:57 AM
 
Location: Portlandia "burbs"
10,234 posts, read 13,979,154 times
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I don't want to read 8 pages of posts, so I hope I don't repeat others.

How big of a city do you want to live in? And what do you want from it?

In California there is Redding in the northern half, with HOT summers and some snowy winters (but not all the time). It's small and not particularly exciting, but that region offers much for the outdoor activities.

There are very small but charming places near the base of Yosemite, like Oakhurst, with homes selling for great prices (although, being here on a green card, you'll be renting, I assume). You would have to drive to Merced for many of your shopping needs but it isn't that far. Sonora is another one but at the other side of Yosemite, with nice summers and light snowy winters.

Do you like desert? Check out Yucca Valley, CA. It's a small town, and it's summers are more pleasant than HOT, but they do have some snowy winters, and it's clean with clear skies (great for star-gazers). It's close to Palm Springs and all those much hotter places, which have their own charm.
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Old 04-26-2012, 08:27 AM
 
Location: Austin, TX
10,779 posts, read 9,411,925 times
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Some places come to mind:
* mountains of California (Tahoe)
* Denver
* South/North Dakota
* higher elevations of Appalachian mountains in the South
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Old 04-26-2012, 09:08 AM
 
Location: Santa Barbara, CA
1,154 posts, read 3,963,372 times
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Salt Lake City. 60" of snow a year and average summertime highs well above 90 degrees. Tons of sun all around, and nearly half of their annual precipitation falls as snow - so very little rain.
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Old 04-26-2012, 09:15 AM
 
Location: Santa Barbara, CA
1,154 posts, read 3,963,372 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by alex985 View Post
Sioux Falls, SD. Average highs below freezing all 3 months of winter, average high of 86 F in July, snow stays on the ground for the most part during winter, and has 4 real seasons. Denver? Salt Lake City? Any places that can easily get to 60 or 70F during winter should not be suggested to the O.P.
Record Jan temp in SLC, 63 degrees. In Sioux Falls, 66 degrees. SLC also averages 20" per year more than SF.

http://nowdata.rcc-acis.org/FSD/pubACIS_results
http://nowdata.rcc-acis.org/SLC/pubACIS_results
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