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Old 03-06-2012, 09:01 PM
 
Location: West Tennessee
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In my opinion when the climate switches from Humid Subtropical to Humid Continental, it has become too cold for me. Unfortunately, I spend alot of my time just north of that line. But honestly the excessive wind bothers me than the cold where I am now. (Rolla, MO)
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Old 03-06-2012, 11:16 PM
 
Location: Tucson/Nogales
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The wind!! The wind!!! How we oftentimes overlook this critical factor!!!

Temperatures, standing alone, always do a good job of deceiving people!
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Old 03-06-2012, 11:37 PM
 
Location: Jefferson City 4 days a week, St. Louis 3 days a week
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RonnieJonez View Post
There is a difference in the Great Lakes midwestern cities vs the interior midwest cities in terms of weather.

Kansas City compared to Chicago is basically tropical.
Somewhat...I wouldn't say tropical, but definitely not nearly as harsh. And as far as Great LAkes go, in the interior Midwest there are many cities equal as bad (Minneapolis, Omaha, Des Moines, etc.) The biggest difference is that the Great Lakes cities typically get considerably more snowfall. The interior Midwest south of the latitudes of the Great Lakes still get cold in the winter with reasonable amounts of snow...just not typically as cold or as much snowfall as in the overwhelming amounts the Great Lakes cities and cities further west on similar latitudes
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Old 03-06-2012, 11:40 PM
 
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Aren't places like Montana and North Dakota pretty damn cold?
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Old 03-06-2012, 11:45 PM
 
Location: Jefferson City 4 days a week, St. Louis 3 days a week
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SoEdible View Post
Aren't places like Montana and North Dakota pretty damn cold?
Yes, and BRUTALLY to that extent....I couldn't stand the winter in either place. Snowfall is very bad in this area too. Wind chills are bitterly cold...I would imagine 20 to 40 below in windchills are pretty common.
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Old 03-07-2012, 01:58 AM
 
Location: Valdez, Alaska
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Depends on the person, of course. Lots of people think it's too cold here. I don't, but I do think it's too cold in Fairbanks.
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Old 03-07-2012, 06:03 AM
 
Location: northern Vermont - previously NM, WA, & MA
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I would say most places north of I-70
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Old 03-07-2012, 07:18 AM
 
Location: Austin, TX
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Basically the border between Dixie and the North but include the DelMarva peninsula in the warm sector and then from Louisville,KY draw a line due west across far south IN and IL and going just north of the St. Louis and KC metro areas. I remember when I lived in the KC area that we could have cool but relatively harmless days down in Johnson County but St. Joseph, MO, just a little further north could be 10-15 degrees colder and snowing.

From KC draw a line that goes slightly northwest and the warm sector includes all the front range cities including Ft. Collins. Then that line goes due south around the Rocky Mountains and cuts through the northern half of NM just north of Santa Fe and then covers all of Arizona and some of southern Utah, all of southern NV and then all of California except elevations above 4000 feet, basically from the coast including the foothills but not Lake Tahoe. The line continues north into western Oregon, with elevations below 3000 feet included. It extends into western WA state, with elevations below 2000 feet included.

That line continues into Canada. The only city in Canada not "too cold" would be Vancouver. The line heads west at that point.

Everything above the line I drew is in the "too cold" sector. Everything below that line is not necessarily warm, but not excessively cold.
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Old 03-07-2012, 07:29 AM
 
Location: Bel Air, California
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near the top of Mt Washington in New Hampshire's White Mountains, although that's mostly due to the somewhat breezy conditions found there.

sometimes it can get chilly near Tower, MN and there are a few of the higher Rocky Mtn passes in Colorado and Montana that can be occasionaly on the cool side.
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Old 03-07-2012, 07:39 AM
 
Location: Austin, TX
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ghengis View Post
near the top of Mt Washington in New Hampshire's White Mountains, although that's mostly due to the somewhat breezy conditions found there.

sometimes it can get chilly near Tower, MN and there are a few of the higher Rocky Mtn passes in Colorado and Montana that can be occasionaly on the cool side.
Yeah and Death Valley gets a little warm but only if you're standing in the sun
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