U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > General U.S.
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 06-17-2012, 06:11 PM
 
Location: Charleston, SC
723 posts, read 1,399,024 times
Reputation: 288

Advertisements

I'd say anywhere N of Hartford, CT is too cold for me. I hated being in Boston for three days at the end of Feb. in 2008 and it was 20F in the daytime and below that at night with a wind coming off the ocean. That was cold.

Even living out here in SC (near Charleston) I do not mind the cool temperatures we get at all. The area shuts down when we get more than a couple flurries of snow, but it is fun. Usually, even the bigger snows are gone in a day or two. Some places had as much as 9" or more here in 2010 and most of it was gone by Sunday (the snow fell Friday night).
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 06-18-2012, 04:58 AM
 
Location: West Michigan
3,077 posts, read 5,453,777 times
Reputation: 4333
Quote:
Originally Posted by NowInWI View Post
The entire eastern border of Wisconsin is Lake Michigan. Milwaukee lows average higher than the Traverse City lows. Inland, away from Lake Michigan, the lows would average lower. Don't paint with such a broad brush - extreme lows in Wisconsin do not cover the entire state.
Sorry, but Wisconsin is on the wrong side of the lake to get much of a warming effect. You get your weather/wind from the west, and it's brutal in the winter. They call Green Bay the "frozen tundra" for a reason. That's why Michigan gets lots of lake-effect snow, and Wisconsin doesn't. That's why western MI is one of the best fruit growing regions in the country, and Wisconsin is not. I painted with a broad brush because it's accurate.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-18-2012, 05:18 AM
 
2,601 posts, read 4,075,131 times
Reputation: 2275
Quote:
Originally Posted by michigan83 View Post
It's because of Lake Michigan. The big lake keeps the nighttime lows during January from hitting the extreme, extreme lows that are seen in Wisconsin and Minnesota. The air warms up as it comes over the lake, and it also creates cloud cover when other places in the midwest have clear skies.

Traverse City IS colder than southern Indiana and Ohio, and gets WAY more snowfall. But it doesn't get temperature extremes. It might be 10 degrees above zero all day, but only drop to 5 degrees at night, instead of -40.

Average Weather for Traverse City, MI - Temperature and Precipitation

Average Weather for Green Bay, WI - Temperature and Precipitation

I had been comparing to Milwaukee, which definitely has a warmer average than Traverse City. This compares GreenBay, which is said is considerably colder. Only slightly for two months...otherwise, the same.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-18-2012, 08:55 AM
 
Location: Pittsburgh, PA (Morningside)
12,439 posts, read 11,941,006 times
Reputation: 10547
Personally, I'm fine with anything above 20 degrees in the winter, provided no wind is blowing.

I actually prefer cold winters to cruddy, kind of cold winters. One of the worst things about living in Pittsburgh is the winters are the worst of both worlds. Unlike New England, it's not cold enough there is a constant blanket of snow. Instead, it hovers just around freezing, with small snow accumulations, then melting, then cold rain, then more small snow accumulations. It seldom gets warm enough too be a "nice winter day" though (which I would define in the 40s/50s).

On the whole though, I hate summer a lot more than winter. Around when I turned 20, I started sweating profusely whenever the temperature gets above 75 degrees. I can't imagine living in the south.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-18-2012, 09:53 AM
 
Location: Somerville, MA
8,017 posts, read 16,075,189 times
Reputation: 9377
Hmmm... I think I live right on the edge of it for me, but it would depend on outside circumstances.

For example, Portland Maine was too cold for me. However, I would live in Chicago which is colder than Portland. The reason? Chicago offers a lot more to keep me entertained in the winter than a small town like Portland. If there are distractions, it's easier to get by. Boston's not a whole lot warmer than Portland (but it's certainly noticeable), but there's a lot more here to make the winter more tolerable. I love it here despite the cold. In fact, I enjoy a lot about winter (especially the first few snows, skiing, and calm sunny days with temps between 25-35 are actually really nice).

As far as being out of the question, all of Maine, Northern New Hampshire, Vermont, much of Northern New York State, Most of Michigan, Most of Wisconsin (would consider Milwaukee), Most of Minnesota (would consider MSP), The Dakotas, Montana, Wyoming, most of Idaho and all of Alaska.

But again, it's not just the cold that would keep me from moving to most of those places. But it's a major reason I'd rule them out.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-18-2012, 09:59 AM
 
Location: Minneapolis (St. Louis Park)
5,991 posts, read 8,322,771 times
Reputation: 4270
The Great Lakes shield Michigan from the arctic cold TEMPS but not the "cold index", which would mean the level of discomfort that chilly air AND humidity from the lake can create. Being semi-wet in 25 degree weather can feel colder than 0 and super dry, to me.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-18-2012, 05:10 PM
 
7,603 posts, read 9,459,597 times
Reputation: 8967
Quote:
Originally Posted by lrfox View Post
Hmmm... I think I live right on the edge of it for me, but it would depend on outside circumstances.

For example, Portland Maine was too cold for me. However, I would live in Chicago which is colder than Portland. The reason? Chicago offers a lot more to keep me entertained in the winter than a small town like Portland. If there are distractions, it's easier to get by. Boston's not a whole lot warmer than Portland (but it's certainly noticeable), but there's a lot more here to make the winter more tolerable. I love it here despite the cold. In fact, I enjoy a lot about winter (especially the first few snows, skiing, and calm sunny days with temps between 25-35 are actually really nice).

As far as being out of the question, all of Maine, Northern New Hampshire, Vermont, much of Northern New York State, Most of Michigan, Most of Wisconsin (would consider Milwaukee), Most of Minnesota (would consider MSP), The Dakotas, Montana, Wyoming, most of Idaho and all of Alaska.

But again, it's not just the cold that would keep me from moving to most of those places. But it's a major reason I'd rule them out.
If Portland, ME is too cold for you, then you can certainly rule out Minneapolis, which is extremely cold ( lows in single digits, or often below zero), and you could also probably rule out Milwaukee, too, cultural attractions or not...
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-18-2012, 05:14 PM
 
404 posts, read 738,835 times
Reputation: 440
Anywhere where it's regularly 10 or more below, which isn't many places

Sent from my AT&T Samsung Galaxy Note
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-18-2012, 06:48 PM
 
Location: Jefferson City 4 days a week, St. Louis 3 days a week
2,709 posts, read 4,231,628 times
Reputation: 998
Quote:
Originally Posted by RonnieJonez View Post
There is a difference in the Great Lakes midwestern cities vs the interior midwest cities in terms of weather.

Kansas City compared to Chicago is basically tropical.
Tropical? That's a stretch to say the least. While I agree they aren't on the same level, KC still is capable of being very cold and very snowy, as is virtually all of the Midwest. If Chicago's winters are severe, KC's are moderate.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-18-2012, 06:55 PM
 
Location: Jefferson City 4 days a week, St. Louis 3 days a week
2,709 posts, read 4,231,628 times
Reputation: 998
I would probably think that anywhere in the Upper Midwest (the Dakotas, Minnesota, Wisconsin and Michigan) would be the best fit for this area. Also, Nebraska, Iowa, Wyoming, and Northern Illinois are capable of falling into this area as well. i'd say that the I-80 corridor serves as a pretty good southern boundary for severe winters in the U.S.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > General U.S.
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top