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Old 03-06-2012, 03:52 PM
 
Location: Chicago
1,312 posts, read 1,583,250 times
Reputation: 1487

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If you're response is something along the lines of, "Everyone is a beautiful snow flake with all their own unique designs and intricacies, blah, blah, blah", you need not respond to this.



Say someone on shows up on City-Data wanting to know where a good place to live would be, but not one that is too "cold". Where is this line drawn?

And I ask this because a lot of people through various "Top" lists of all varieties having people stating that they could never live in Chicago because it's too "cold". Fair enough. I would also assume those people wouldn't want to live in Minneapolis/St. Paul either because that is measurably colder than Chicago.

But what about Indianapolis? Is it really that "warmer" than Chicago? Or Des Moines? Kansas City? St. Louis? Omaha? Reno?

Where does this *universal (democratically agreed upon)* "too cold" line run?

Does a state/city just have a stigma it can't shake, while other areas are just as cold if not more so, while never being mentioned as "too cold"?

Does it have to do with the size of the city, and what it offers? That is; people are more willing to accept "too cold" if it offers a lot of things, while dismissing other places as "too cold" as well, but are in fact statistically warmer than the bigger city?



It seems to me that drawing a line on a map to divide too cold/not too cold would look a lot like a stock market graph during cycles of boom and bust.

What average yearly temperature would be considered the cut off line for "too cold"?

Climate of 100 Selected U.S. Cities — FactMonster.com

What do you think?
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Old 03-06-2012, 04:05 PM
 
Location: M I N N E S O T A
14,800 posts, read 17,723,856 times
Reputation: 9029
For me Barrow, Alaska is too cold
There is people who want nothing to do with Minneapolis, Chicago, Buffalo, Milwaukee because of our "Brutal" winters. Even though they may have alot to offer
Idk about Omaha, Indy or Des Moines but very few people call St Louis, Kansas City and Reno "Too cold"
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Old 03-06-2012, 04:10 PM
 
35,108 posts, read 40,267,404 times
Reputation: 62061
Quote:
Originally Posted by A2DAC1985 View Post
If you're response is something along the lines of, "Everyone is a beautiful snow flake with all their own unique designs and intricacies, blah, blah, blah", you need not respond to this.



Say someone on shows up on City-Data wanting to know where a good place to live would be, but not one that is too "cold". Where is this line drawn?

And I ask this because a lot of people through various "Top" lists of all varieties having people stating that they could never live in Chicago because it's too "cold". Fair enough. I would also assume those people wouldn't want to live in Minneapolis/St. Paul either because that is measurably colder than Chicago.

But what about Indianapolis? Is it really that "warmer" than Chicago? Or Des Moines? Kansas City? St. Louis? Omaha? Reno?

Where does this *universal (democratically agreed upon)* "too cold" line run?

Does a state/city just have a stigma it can't shake, while other areas are just as cold if not more so, while never being mentioned as "too cold"?

Does it have to do with the size of the city, and what it offers? That is; people are more willing to accept "too cold" if it offers a lot of things, while dismissing other places as "too cold" as well, but are in fact statistically warmer than the bigger city?



It seems to me that drawing a line on a map to divide too cold/not too cold would look a lot like a stock market graph during cycles of boom and bust.

What average yearly temperature would be considered the cut off line for "too cold"?

Climate of 100 Selected U.S. Cities — FactMonster.com

What do you think?
Hard to say because of the different way humans feel about the cold. To me it is too cold in Iowa and I live in Iowa. I also think it is too cold in Chicago but the cold in Ann Arbor, Michigan was very different to me than the cold in Iowa or Chicago. I thought Florida was too cold when I was there however, it was colder there temperature wise than it was in Illinois where I was living at the time. Overall though I think my general choice of too cold having never been there though would be Alaska, Maryland and Maine.
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Old 03-06-2012, 04:11 PM
 
Location: Zurich, Switzerland/ Piedmont, CA
32,377 posts, read 55,190,768 times
Reputation: 15454
For me anything under 50F for a daytime high is probably too cold.
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Old 03-06-2012, 04:28 PM
 
Location: Seattle, Washington
3,733 posts, read 6,483,697 times
Reputation: 1989
Barrow, Alaska. Almost every month is below freezing, and the warmest averages only in the 40s for highs. Even Interior Alaska has average highs in the upper 60s and lower to mid 70s in the summer months, with record high extremes of up to 100 degrees!
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Old 03-06-2012, 05:03 PM
 
Location: Jefferson City 4 days a week, St. Louis 3 days a week
2,709 posts, read 4,230,797 times
Reputation: 998
Quote:
Originally Posted by BobMarley_1LOVE View Post
For me Barrow, Alaska is too cold
There is people who want nothing to do with Minneapolis, Chicago, Buffalo, Milwaukee because of our "Brutal" winters. Even though they may have alot to offer
Idk about Omaha, Indy or Des Moines but very few people call St Louis, Kansas City and Reno "Too cold"
Not from where I stand. A lot of people who get mild, not moderate, winters like these places would likely consider them a bit too cold and snowy. consider these places too cold...as far as Indy goes, Indy is reaches about the same temperatures as Kansas City in January, without the same brutal wind chills KC can get, and isn't substantially colder than STL, although it is slightly colder. Omaha and Des Moines I would generally agree might be considered too cold. In general, it seems like starting at the latitudes of the Great Lakes is where winter becomes unbearably cold for more than 50% of the country...snow on the ground most of the time, and long deep freezes. My opinion of the places that would be too cold for me to live in would be in the far northern stretches of the country, like Minnesota, Northern Wisconsin, the UP of Michigan, and Upstate New York. Probably Cleveland and Erie as well, and Boston...all see more snowfall than I'm willing to tolerate.

Alaska I'd almost certainly never live in..probably nowhere in Canada either except maybe Windsor.

Regardless, it's relative to where you live. Same thing with it being too hot. I've heard people living in Phoenix calling people babies because 117 degrees of dry heat isn't all that bad to them...it's not humid, after all
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Old 03-06-2012, 05:40 PM
Status: "Be yourself. What's the alternative?" (set 22 days ago)
 
8,704 posts, read 10,850,989 times
Reputation: 12767
Minnesota winters seem especially harsh.
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Old 03-06-2012, 05:46 PM
 
261 posts, read 305,184 times
Reputation: 387
My rule of thumb is it's too cold when nose hairs freeze. It was 8 degrees when we left for work this morning. That was too cold. I prefer a low of 50.

I think duration of cold temps plays a factor too. I can take a month or two of cooler weather, but by month 6 I am ready to drive south until I feel warm.
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Old 03-06-2012, 06:35 PM
 
Location: Tucson/Nogales
17,409 posts, read 21,254,176 times
Reputation: 24241
Come to Las Vegas sometime in January, when the temp falls to the mid-to-high 20's at night, and pack a, not unusual, 40-50mph wind behind it and it will give Minnesota a run for its money!

I lived in Minnesota for 43 years, and how many times have I said it, in winter here: Oh crap! I'm back in Minnesota!

It's the dry air which contributes to the discomfort and pain!
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Old 03-06-2012, 07:37 PM
 
1,911 posts, read 3,241,725 times
Reputation: 910
There is a difference in the Great Lakes midwestern cities vs the interior midwest cities in terms of weather.

Kansas City compared to Chicago is basically tropical.
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