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Old 03-18-2012, 11:24 AM
 
Location: Austin, TX/London, UK
709 posts, read 1,159,988 times
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Seattle. That city has been in the dumps and pulled itself out many many times in its history. I can't think of any city that has had as many terrible lows and wonderful heights as Seattle.


Quote:
Originally Posted by Chicago60614 View Post
Seattle's dark days were like a runny nose compared to places that really had it rough.

Looking at cities 60 years ago after the war compared to today is unreal. If only we could turn some of our cities around like others have.

Tokyo 65 years ago

Berlin 65 years ago
Those are not American cities.

But for American cities compared to them, using 60 years I think we have. Only it hasn't been done the same. We have still done much of the same building and growth. Only people moved to places and such. The rebuilding wasn't needed since the war was in Europe and Asia, but building was still needed. And just as much building and growth has happened.

For example at the same time as those cities you are referencing in the photos were taken (during WWII) Austin was a small college town of 50,000 people. Now it is a large metro of 1,850,000 people. That is a lot of building and growth.

Last edited by BevoLJ; 03-18-2012 at 11:35 AM..
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Old 03-18-2012, 02:29 PM
 
Location: Portlandia "burbs"
10,234 posts, read 14,000,811 times
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I've never been there, but I read an article a few years ago about how Philadelphia has been making a comeback due to arts and upgraded neighborhoods. Can anyone on here atest to that?
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Old 03-18-2012, 04:25 PM
 
Location: Cleveland bound with MPLS in the rear-view
5,530 posts, read 10,150,575 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BevoLJ View Post
Seattle. That city has been in the dumps and pulled itself out many many times in its history. I can't think of any city that has had as many terrible lows and wonderful heights as Seattle.


Those are not American cities.

But for American cities compared to them, using 60 years I think we have. Only it hasn't been done the same. We have still done much of the same building and growth. Only people moved to places and such. The rebuilding wasn't needed since the war was in Europe and Asia, but building was still needed. And just as much building and growth has happened.

For example at the same time as those cities you are referencing in the photos were taken (during WWII) Austin was a small college town of 50,000 people. Now it is a large metro of 1,850,000 people. That is a lot of building and growth.
I'm sorry, but can you enlighten us as to Seattle's "terrible lows" that compare to other American cities who've truly suffered, such as Philly, Detroit, Cleveland, Pittsburgh, Baltimore, etc., etc., etc? I'm not even sure Seattle was greatly affected by Urban Renewal as much as Midwestern and Northeastern cities did, let alone a catastrophic industrial collapse like the Rust Belt incurred.......I've never heard of Seattle's "plight", but may need some enlightening.
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Old 03-18-2012, 05:29 PM
 
5,556 posts, read 6,992,881 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by west336 View Post
I'm sorry, but can you enlighten us as to Seattle's "terrible lows" that compare to other American cities who've truly suffered, such as Philly, Detroit, Cleveland, Pittsburgh, Baltimore, etc., etc., etc? I'm not even sure Seattle was greatly affected by Urban Renewal as much as Midwestern and Northeastern cities did, let alone a catastrophic industrial collapse like the Rust Belt incurred.......I've never heard of Seattle's "plight", but may need some enlightening.

The great Aerospace jobs bust of 1969-72. Will the last person leaving Seattle please turn off the lights? That was when Boeing laid off a large chunk of employees.
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Old 03-18-2012, 06:14 PM
 
Location: Chicago(Northside)
3,719 posts, read 6,101,444 times
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Cincinnati deserves to be on that list. We had some tuff times with crime but now its getting better with a new casino, new tower, new musem,new park, actualy two new parks and a streetcar system currently on construction.
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Old 03-21-2012, 01:22 PM
 
340 posts, read 650,028 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by couldntthinkofaclevername View Post
This list made me laugh so hard. El Paso? Denver? Arlington? Then you've got DC and Boston which have never not been popular cities, to name a few.
DC was not popular to move to untill the last 8-10 yrs, if that. its definitely a more attractive city now then years past with all the gentrification and luxury condo/apts/buildings being developed. the image of the city has changed dramaticlly. in the 80s/90s to many DC was just known for politics and being the murder capital

but i still wouldnt call it a comeback city.. cuz it was never the "it" city to begin with
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Old 03-22-2012, 07:47 AM
 
21,211 posts, read 30,435,315 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by danielj72 View Post
I am not a troll for a post describing what Detroit is really like. You cannot deny Detroit is 1/3 abandonded or that it is filled with corruption and crime. You cannot deny that the real Detroit is in its suburbs, that is where the life is, that is where things are built, that is where good law abiding/productive people live. For a city to be considered as being a comeback city the inner core of the city must be on the mend. Detroit is far from that, and its future looks very bleak. Some have even suggested that in 50 years it will be nearly completly abandoned. ( although even I doubt that valuable river frontage will be forgoten) If you want to see what a true revival city looks like visit Cleveland or Pittsburg. Those cities are revival cities, Detroit on the other hand is more of a warning to other troubled towns on how bad things can get. Any one who doubts what I am posting need only to google "the ruins of Detroit" and there will be youtube videos displaying the mayhem and wreckage that is modern Detroit.
read up...

http://www.nytimes.com/2011/07/03/fa...pagewanted=all
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Old 03-30-2012, 12:12 PM
 
Location: Cleveland, Ohio
1,372 posts, read 2,797,630 times
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Cleveland continues its powerful momentum ... unabated

Downtown Cleveland's boom is real, experts say, thanks to millennials moving in | cleveland.com
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