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Old 03-11-2012, 09:00 AM
 
Location: The western periphery of Terra Australis
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I think it's sad there are so few Native Americans left in the US. Funnily enough Native place names are everywhere, yet natives themselves are a rarity.
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Old 03-11-2012, 11:45 AM
 
Location: Coastal New Jersey
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Trimac20 View Post
I think it's sad there are so few Native Americans left in the US. Funnily enough Native place names are everywhere, yet natives themselves are a rarity.
This is true. Many place names in New Jersey are of Indian origin, usually corrupted/Anglicized, but still. And we have very few original people with ties to their heritage here.
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Old 03-11-2012, 02:34 PM
 
Location: Guangzhou, China
9,782 posts, read 13,369,912 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by john_starks View Post
hell yeah, the most marginalized people on the planet
That's a pretty bold statement...

Quote:
it's they're land that dancin with the stars exists

they should be able to vote off everyone
... vote everyone off of Dancing With The Stars, or, off the continent??
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Old 03-11-2012, 03:10 PM
 
Location: Toronto
3,338 posts, read 5,799,510 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mightyqueen801 View Post
This is true. Many place names in New Jersey are of Indian origin, usually corrupted/Anglicized, but still. And we have very few original people with ties to their heritage here.
In general it seems place names, names of areas, regions, states/provinces, cities, towns, counties, lakes, rivers, streets, whether in the US, Canada, Australia etc. seem to survive long after the original people's cultures or even their presence is no longer in the area.

I think this can be a broader trend in that place names (and loanwords) are the last vestige of tongues no longer spoken.
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Old 03-11-2012, 08:10 PM
 
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There is a relatively big presence here in the Syracuse area. They make up about 2% of the city's population, with most in the Valley neighborhoods and the Near Westside. There is the Onondaga Indian Nation Reservation about 3 miles south of Syracuse. Kids on the Reservation attend LaFayette Schools, in which about 30% of the students are Native American. They are a Lacrosse power because the game was created by the Haudenosaunee(aka Iroquois), which the Onondaga are a part of. Lacrosse is a major sport in our area high schools and in general. An adjacent school district in Onondaga Central Schools, Native American students make up about 4-5%. Nedrow, a suburb in that district and that is in between the Reservation and the Syracuse city line, is about 10% Native American. Native American students make up around 2% of the Syracuse City, North
Syracuse and East Syracuse-Minoa school districts.

Not only are Onondagas in our area, but Oneidas, Akwesasne(aka Mohawks) and Senecas are as well. Turning Stone Casino in Verona is owned by the Oneidas. Cayugas are also in the area.

Last edited by ckhthankgod; 03-11-2012 at 08:19 PM..
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Old 03-12-2012, 12:05 AM
 
Location: East of the Sun, West of the Moon
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There are more NAs back east than people realize. It is just that they make up a very small percentage of the overall population in those areas. I helped out at the Miss Indian World pageant last year and met a bunch of nice ladies from NY, PA, and Mass.
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Old 03-12-2012, 08:19 AM
 
56,736 posts, read 81,038,544 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ABQConvict View Post
There are more NAs back east than people realize. It is just that they make up a very small percentage of the overall population in those areas. I helped out at the Miss Indian World pageant last year and met a bunch of nice ladies from NY, PA, and Mass.
So true. I went to school with a few Native Americans in suburban Syracuse. People would be surprised, as Buffalo, Syracuse and parts of northern Upstate NY have reservations, as well as communities and schools with high or relatively high Native American populations. Upstate NY school districts like LaFayette, Salmon River, Silver Creek, Niagara-Wheatfield, Akron, Salamanca, Massena, Onondaga Central and select schools in the Syracuse and Buffalo City School Districts come to mind.
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Old 03-12-2012, 03:07 PM
 
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I'm not sure how it is in other regions, but there are lots of white people in the South who look like they have significant Native American ancestry. I know a lot of people like that, and they tell me that they don't know of any Hispanic, Italian, etc ancestry that would cause them to have darker skin, eyes, and hair, so they assume that they have some Native American ancestry. It seems more common in the South, but maybe it's not...

Dont ask me how or why I came across this video... But the girl and her mom are examples of what I'm talking about. I grew up seeing a lot of people like that. They're just considered regular white Southerners.

Toddlers & Tiaras - and the name is.. - YouTube

Last edited by Smtchll; 03-12-2012 at 03:15 PM..
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Old 03-12-2012, 09:28 PM
 
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In the suburb where I live I see a Native American Indian store in the three major closest shopping malls. I live in the Midwest. I don't really see people who I could identify as Native Americans but in the malls they make their presence known. So far they seem to be doing ok because they haven't closed shop yet. Hopefully they will stay in business and occasionally I see white people go into the Native American Indian stores in the malls.

American Indians in general as of late have been getting more attention. First the movie Avatar which presented an allegory of Native Americans as being the good guys fighting against the humans, the RDA as the bad guys which seems to be a play on the United States which repeated harmed Native Americans. Then later unfortunately the US military calling Osama Bin Laden "Geronimo" comparing Al Qaeda to all Native Americans which was extremely offensive and unacceptable and the US military never publically apologized for that.

Surely Native Americans aren't really forgotten in my area of the country. But they aren't so well featured either. I hope so more in the future but the stores in the malls are a positive thing though and I hope to see authentic Native culture in America. Not in any way vilified like the US military or many Americans like to do, but done by Natives to show their culture in a positive light.
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Old 03-12-2012, 10:59 PM
 
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The US Census released its regular survey of native languages back in December, and the numbers were interesting:

Native North American Languages Spoken at Home in the United States and Puerto Rico

There are an estimated total of 372,095 speakers of native languages in the US, and over 45% of all of them are Navajo speakers. After Navajo (with 169,471 estimated speakers), the number of speakers for the next-most widely-spoken language (Central Alaskan Yup'ik) drops off almost by a factor of 10, to 18,950. There are only 19 native languages with more than 2,000 speakers.

Oregon (and the Pacific Northwest in general) was one of the most linguistically-dense areas of North America, with several dozen different languages and dialects packed into a relatively small area, sometimes with several different languages appearing among tribes living along the same river, for example.

But most of that was lost when the tribes were "consolidated" on to a handful of reservations. Now, there are only a few native speakers of Oregon languages left around, and many are elderly. Quite a few local languages saw their final native speakers die between the 1970's and today, such as this recent passing:

Oregon Public Broadcasting news - Last Fluent Speaker Of Oregon Tribal Language 'Kiksht' Dies

There is an effort to teach a language called Ichishkíin Sínwit (AKA "Sahaptin") to younger people on a few of Oregon's reservations, but North American languages in general are tough to pick up unless you learn them at home.
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