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Old 03-19-2012, 07:47 PM
 
Location: SF Bay Area
15,470 posts, read 25,445,221 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by PosterExtraordinaire View Post
On the coast, SD is pretty humid but the temps struggle to get much higher than 70. It get's hotter and drier the further you get inland. I think the perfect climate in SD is about 10 miles inland. The coast is often chilly at night even in the summer.
The average high in SD in July is 76 and July 78. It's quite rare for a day to not break 70 between July and Sept along the coast. I found the nights thereto be mild to wam,, between 65-70 usually, but I guess it depends what you're comparing it to, compared to Northern CA that is warm. Compared to 2/3 of the US I wouldn't call it humid either, dewpoints were usually in the low to mid 60's much of the time.
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Old 03-19-2012, 08:05 PM
 
Location: Minneapolis
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Minneapolis has been warmer than Phoenix for the last week. It has hit 80 a couple of times and people are going to the beach and walking around in shorts. It is pretty amazing considering that it is still winter and it is not unknown to have below zero weather this time of year.
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Old 03-20-2012, 08:03 AM
 
2,076 posts, read 3,082,358 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sav858 View Post
The average high in SD in July is 76 and July 78. It's quite rare for a day to not break 70 between July and Sept along the coast. I found the nights thereto be mild to wam,, between 65-70 usually, but I guess it depends what you're comparing it to, compared to Northern CA that is warm. Compared to 2/3 of the US I wouldn't call it humid either, dewpoints were usually in the low to mid 60's much of the time.
I lived on the coast for 3 years and even though the average high for SD is probably 76-78 you have to keep in mind that this average is probably for DT or something. Valleys especially, even if near the coast, can vary sometimes as large as 10-20F. On the coast, during say July, if it got to the mid 70s I was happy. It became a different story during August/September when the santa ana's began to blow.

The humidity on the coast is probably higher than 2/3s the country. You don't feel sticky because it's constantly windy and 70 but it's definitely there. I think a lot of people assume it's not humid because it doesn't rain and they're not sweating. Now going inland, especially over those mountains, the air becomes very dry and I notice it. My skin is actually sensitive to moisture in the air and I noticed that coastal SD was one of the better places for it. That includes much of the south/midwest/northeast. Places that people think automatically are humid as all hell.
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Old 03-20-2012, 09:41 AM
 
Location: IN
20,861 posts, read 35,992,597 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Butterz View Post
And yet Europe had one of the worst winters in history...I'm not discounting global warming, but I do not think you can get caught up in local (yes I am generalizing the US a local) weather. Ocean temperature have continued to rise, and I think that should be the bigger area of concern. Although patterns of warming and cooling are normal in geological records. Is the global warming we are experiencing a result of part of the earths larger 'season' or are humans to blame. Probably both, and being aware of this and doing our best to reduce greenhouse gasses is certainly in our best interest. Interesting topic!
When temperatures are 30-40F above average in most areas of the US where people live you are bound to notice.

Last edited by GraniteStater; 03-20-2012 at 10:40 AM..
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Old 03-20-2012, 10:40 AM
 
Location: 3219'03.7"N 10643'55.9"W
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I have been walking around the last few weeks with a big smile.

Life is too short for winter.
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Old 03-20-2012, 10:42 AM
 
Location: IN
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mike0421 View Post
I have been walking around the last few weeks with a big smile.

Life is too short for winter.
Ya, in the south-central US with its brown, drab, and mostly snowless winters- they aren't very fun. In the north its usually far more enjoyable with lots of snow on the ground for long periods of time. People get outside and enjoy winter sports.
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Old 03-20-2012, 11:02 AM
 
9,967 posts, read 14,633,103 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Inkpoe View Post
Not all... it has snowed in Seattle more than a couple times just this last week; not normal at all. (Didn't stick around for too long as the rain melt it.)

Where is this warming trend? Seattle could use some warmth.
Yeah, same with Portland--it was snowing in the hills above town and down on the flatlands of the east side last week--and might snow more this week. Mt. Hood's been pounded with several feet of snow over the last week and scheduled for a ton more this week. The last few years though, we've gotten really late winter storms through the start of spring almost into May.
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Old 03-20-2012, 11:12 AM
 
Location: 3219'03.7"N 10643'55.9"W
8,115 posts, read 17,340,828 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GraniteStater View Post
Ya, in the south-central US with its brown, drab, and mostly snowless winters- they aren't very fun. In the north its usually far more enjoyable with lots of snow on the ground for long periods of time. People get outside and enjoy winter sports.
In your opinion! I once lived next door to a homeowner whose dog liked to eat his own feces. For all I know, that dog also enjoyed lots of snow on the ground.

If you look at where man originated, he did so in a) Mesopotomia if you are a creationist, or b) the Great Rift Valley of Africa if you are an evolutionist. In neither scenario did civilization begin in New Hampshire! That's because man was not designed for that type of climate.
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Old 03-20-2012, 11:18 AM
 
Location: Cleveland bound with MPLS in the rear-view
5,530 posts, read 10,148,967 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mike0421 View Post
In your opinion! I once lived next door to a homeowner whose dog liked to eat his own feces. For all I know, that dog also enjoyed lots of snow on the ground.

If you look at where man originated, he did so in a) Mesopotomia if you are a creationist, or b) the Great Rift Valley of Africa if you are an evolutionist. In neither scenario did civilization begin in New Hampshire! That's because man was not designed for that type of climate.
Man is not designed to live anywhere NEAR the equator either! I think it's MUCH easier to survive in a cooler climate than a hot one. You'll also find that most of the world's prosperity and "livability" is well off the equator (or even the tropics), between the 30th and 50th parallels North, including 38 38' 43" N, -90 15' 43" W
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Old 03-20-2012, 07:22 PM
 
Location: IN
20,861 posts, read 35,992,597 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mike0421 View Post
In your opinion! I once lived next door to a homeowner whose dog liked to eat his own feces. For all I know, that dog also enjoyed lots of snow on the ground.

If you look at where man originated, he did so in a) Mesopotomia if you are a creationist, or b) the Great Rift Valley of Africa if you are an evolutionist. In neither scenario did civilization begin in New Hampshire! That's because man was not designed for that type of climate.
The cold weather doesn't bother me much at all, and the tradeoff lower population densities that I like. Warm climates bother me greatly when the low temperature is 75-80F in the summer. I cannot sleep well even with air conditioning. A colder climate wins out on that point alone. I will also take a more wintry climate for three other mild seasons as well.
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