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Old 03-13-2012, 12:15 PM
 
Location: LBC
4,155 posts, read 4,483,438 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Trimac20 View Post
Did many girls in the Valley or LA even talk in the stereotypical 'Valley girl' manner (as in the Frank Zappa/Moon Unit) song? Even in the film Valley Girl it wasn't that extreme. I did detect the old style Val intonation well into the 90s, films like Clueless kind of reflect that.

I think it's simply because LA is such a dominant media capital, that the dominant fashions and culture, which includes the speech, just spread across the rest of the country through movies, TV shows like the Hills, celebs like Paris Hilton. I don't know why more people tend to speak with the intonation (I know what you're talking about), I think that could just be a natural evolution, not necessarily a Val thing.
Like most stereotypes, it was derived from the more obvious outliers. I recall being especially irritated by the relatively few girls who really pushed it in high school, like, full on. But the use of that inflection/jargon was never that prevalent. I knew a few kids growing up whose quirks, taken together, formed a composite Spicoli. But individually, they were just stoners who just said “dude” every third word.
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Old 03-13-2012, 02:33 PM
 
14,752 posts, read 28,608,889 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Trimac20 View Post
Did many girls in the Valley or LA even talk in the stereotypical 'Valley girl' manner (as in the Frank Zappa/Moon Unit) song? Even in the film Valley Girl it wasn't that extreme. I did detect the old style Val intonation well into the 90s, films like Clueless kind of reflect that.
Yes. It most definitely existed all over SoCal, so I don't know why the Valley was pegged, but it was definitely there, too.

Here's a great example. There was a phone number in West LA that just "didn't work." I mean, you called up, and there was nothing...except many people talking, so they called it the "Party Line." In classic LA style, I heard this:

Mexican guy: "Any chicks?" (add accent)
Surfer/Valley girl: "Get off the line, you f***ing wetb**k" (add accent)

I had to put the phone down, I was laughing so hard.

Hey, isn't Kelly Ripa kind of a grown-up Valley Girl? She's from New Jersey!
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Old 03-13-2012, 09:01 PM
 
Location: The western periphery of Terra Australis
24,683 posts, read 45,369,517 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Stumbler. View Post
Actually, come to think about it, I was just reading about how at least one feature -- the uptalk (or question-like ending when people make statements) aspect of the young generation's speech isn't thought to be exclusively caused by Valspeak but has independently developed in other parts of the English-speaking world (you find it in the UK, Australia, Canada etc.).

That seems to be one style that is associated with Valspeak though.

Speech habits: Uptalk | Books | The Guardian
That's true...I notice some teenage girls in particular talk like that every sentence, it's annoying to listen to.
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Old 03-13-2012, 09:27 PM
 
Location: Toronto
3,338 posts, read 5,791,699 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Trimac20 View Post
That's true...I notice some teenage girls in particular talk like that every sentence, it's annoying to listen to.
From that article I linked to:
Part of her work involves dubbing voices for English language teaching tapes, and she finds that some producers specifically ask her to uptalk in order to imitate how English is spoken by young people - "We have to represent the way kids talk now." In short, if you're a non-English speaker using the new generation of tapes, the way you will learn to speak is uptalk: it's a seismic shift from the clipped 1950s vowels of yesteryear.
...



Oh, no, they're teaching this stuff overseas!

The next generation of English speakers all over the globe are going to start sounding like this?

For the love of... we gotta get some folks who don't sound like Vals over there teaching English to counteract or fight, like this trend?

Someone's got to teach 'em to talk, like proper English or whatever, ya know, 'til it's, like too late?

Totally!
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Old 03-13-2012, 09:40 PM
 
Location: IN
20,847 posts, read 35,942,861 times
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Family guy makin fun of julian - YouTube
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Old 03-13-2012, 09:42 PM
 
Location: In bed with Madonna
475 posts, read 400,054 times
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Not only in the Valley, people all over LA talk like that. I always find myself saying "like" "OMG she was like..." And then i was like..." "you know, its like...". We just cant help it, it comes out by itself.

The video its totally me. I swear. Not that extreme but you get the picture



Valley girl - in this bar - The Catherine Tate Show - BBC comedy - YouTube
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Old 03-17-2012, 04:52 AM
 
958 posts, read 921,837 times
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People who don't come from a place with an actual identity and real culture will pick up really just about anything to use, no matter where it comes from or how unnatural to them it is.

That's why we've got so many kids talking ghetto or with big attitudes who come from nowhere near an urban area. It's all about their background and their self-identity/view of self and how all of that affects the way they speak and act and even think.
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Old 03-17-2012, 07:30 AM
 
570 posts, read 1,144,642 times
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I know a few girls in their early 20's who cannot have a conversation without inserting the word "like" multiple times, even in the most serious of conversations. It detracts from the point they are trying to make, and ends up causing them to sound uneducated and vapid.
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Old 03-17-2012, 08:11 AM
 
Location: Coastal New Jersey
56,036 posts, read 54,537,410 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Stumbler. View Post
Actually, come to think about it, I was just reading about how at least one feature -- the uptalk (or question-like ending when people make statements) aspect of the young generation's speech isn't thought to be exclusively caused by Valspeak but has independently developed in other parts of the English-speaking world (you find it in the UK, Australia, Canada etc.).

That seems to be one style that is associated with Valspeak though.

Speech habits: Uptalk | Books | The Guardian

That drives me nuts. My niece used to do it when she was a teenager. I think she's past that now, in her late 20's.

"This girl? In my class? She was like talking to the teacher? And she like used the 'f' word? And the teacher like sent her to the office?"
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Old 03-17-2012, 08:13 AM
 
Location: Coastal New Jersey
56,036 posts, read 54,537,410 times
Reputation: 66385
Quote:
Originally Posted by daydreamin71 View Post
I know a few girls in their early 20's who cannot have a conversation without inserting the word "like" multiple times, even in the most serious of conversations. It detracts from the point they are trying to make, and ends up causing them to sound uneducated and vapid.
I noticed my daughter starting to do that (she's 20 and in college) and pointed it out to her. I don't want to hear her speaking that way, and it sounds unprofessional and ignorant. She is a linguistics major so she not only became aware of it, but started researching WHY people do that. LOL.
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