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Old 03-13-2012, 03:47 PM
 
14,752 posts, read 28,638,351 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 18Montclair View Post
I wanna say Houston in the 1970s.
Ditto here. I think that's the sweep of the Gulf Freeway around some of the older high-rises, with the gridded streets going on beyond. The newer stuff, making for a glitzier skyline, is to the north of those towers you see.
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Old 03-13-2012, 04:06 PM
 
Location: South Beach and DT Raleigh
11,810 posts, read 18,819,735 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by munchitup View Post
Holy parking lots!
How depressing to even consider what was wiped out to make room for all those surface lots!
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Old 03-13-2012, 04:50 PM
 
Location: Up on the moon laughing down on you
18,509 posts, read 28,187,635 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rnc2mbfl View Post
How depressing to even consider what was wiped out to make room for all those surface lots!
a lot of black folks homes.

Not joking. That side of town was the poorer black area where the black folks who worked mainly in the areas a little bit further south lived.

Over the years that area got more industrial and more parking was needed. The whole 3rd ward area pushed further south, while the rich whites pushed further west.

The good stuff that was demolished were where the skyscrapers are now, on the north side of downtown. That area was filled with beautiful brick buildings. Midtown was also filled with gorgeous mansions, but almost all have been demolished.

Don't think that area in the photo was a great loss. Was filled with cheaply made wood and galvanize shanties. can kinda see it in this photo http://houstorian.files.wordpress.co...ennowcover.jpg


The downtown buildings were a major loss though. They had so much more character:
http://blog.chron.com/bayoucityhistory/
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Old 03-13-2012, 05:03 PM
 
Location: Upper East Side of Texas
12,521 posts, read 23,123,842 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by caseywm23962 View Post
Attached is a pdf that showing an aerial view of (part of) a desolate, seemingly high-tech cityscape, probably in the U.S. It's said to be late 1990s, but I'm thinking older: maybe in the wake of urban renewal "clearing" operations. A friend found it in his filing cabinet but we can't identify where it is.

Any assistance would be appreciated.

Thank you,
Wm. casey
This is most definitely 110% Houston.

I can see the Exxon building & Pierce Elevated Freeway sweeping through what is now Midtown & Downtown.
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Old 03-13-2012, 06:21 PM
 
Location: Jefferson City 4 days a week, St. Louis 3 days a week
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Hard to believe that's Houston...really does show the effect of the New South...it's MUCH bigger now.
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Old 03-13-2012, 08:47 PM
 
11,177 posts, read 22,391,357 times
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I think most cities have cut down big areas during the period of "urban renewal". Most of the time they tore things down expecting rapid rebuilding and rebirth....only to have the 70's hit when cities went to crap and everyone ran away to the burbs. took until the 90's for a lot of it all to begin to rebuild.



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Old 03-19-2012, 10:58 AM
 
Location: Minneapolis
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The feedback received was helpful and "solved" the locational problem. The aerial is indeed of Houston's downtown loop (my term), taken roughly in the vicinity of the intersection of the EastTex Freeway (US 59) and Congress Street.

See attachment.

Thanks to everyone who assisted with good responses and interesting commentary.

Wm. Casey.
Attached Thumbnails
Identifying aerial of unknown U.S. city-tx_houstonloop.jpg  
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Old 03-19-2012, 02:50 PM
 
Location: Where Else...?
740 posts, read 1,020,807 times
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With all due respect, what in sam houston was the point of this thread?
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Old 03-21-2012, 01:29 PM
 
Location: Chicago, IL SouthWest Suburbs
3,528 posts, read 5,167,195 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Chicago60614 View Post
I think most cities have cut down big areas during the period of "urban renewal". Most of the time they tore things down expecting rapid rebuilding and rebirth....only to have the 70's hit when cities went to crap and everyone ran away to the burbs. took until the 90's for a lot of it all to begin to rebuild.



Interesting photo.
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