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Old 03-19-2012, 10:25 AM
 
Location: Jefferson City 4 days a week, St. Louis 3 days a week
2,709 posts, read 4,228,729 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SCentralNEGuy View Post
I think to Southerners anyone from the Northeast, Midwest, Pacific Northwest and Rocky Mountain States from Southern Colorado/Utah on north is a Northerner. If you want to know what Yankee (anyone who has to answer negatively to the question "y'aint from around here are you?") means I would also throw in the Southwest and California (Basically anywhere that is not Texas, Oklahoma, Arkansas, Louisiana, and the Southeast). To Northerners - there is a big difference between Northeasterners, Lower and Upper Midwesterners, inhabitants of the Plains, Westerners, and Pacific Coasters. There is even a difference between the slave-driving, fast paced people that live in the I-95 metro corridor and those that live in say central Massachusetts and/or the Berkshires. Its just Southerners prefer to write off everyone who is not Southern by birth or by several generations even a Californian or New Mexican as a Yankee.
I think that's a pretty accurate statement...if by the southeast you're including Kentucky, Virginia, and West Virginia, all of which are more than enough to be classified as that. In any event, the North is not nearly as culturally and demographically united as the south...you can group the southeast in with the south central and even "western south" states (OK and TX) and not have too many difficulties. However, if you try and group in a state like New Jersey with Iowa, you run into major problems.

One of the things I read historically about the Midwest that separated it from the Northeast was the politics..even today you can see it. The Midwest is probably the most politically balanced region in the country, whereas the N/E is fairly uniformly heavily liberal. The Midwest also I believe was much more isolationist than the N/E, or the other way around, can't remember which, just know that was a major distinguishing point. Also, there is absolutely no similarity between a Chicago accent and a New York accent...the two are almost alien by comparison. Not the case with a Virginia accent vs. say, a Texas one or Mississippi one. Are there noticeable differences? Of course...but the similarities are such that you will immediately classify them all as in the "South," and if not knowledgeable on dialects, you could easily mistake them for each other.
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Old 03-19-2012, 10:26 AM
 
35,108 posts, read 40,238,434 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Chris Balducci View Post
I am a Southerner, and we are often asked what it means to be Southern. Our culture is the most debated in the United States, praised and condemned with equal passion. I would like to turn this around and ask what it means to be a Northerner. What "Northern" values are praised or condemned? God bless.
It means your geographic location is North on the map.
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Old 03-19-2012, 05:13 PM
 
Location: Pennsylvania
1,392 posts, read 1,276,102 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by stlouisan View Post
One of the things I read historically about the Midwest that separated it from the Northeast was the politics..even today you can see it. The Midwest is probably the most politically balanced region in the country, whereas the N/E is fairly uniformly heavily liberal.
You are not at all familiar with Pennsylvania are you?
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Old 03-19-2012, 06:11 PM
 
Location: Vineland, NJ
8,483 posts, read 10,467,331 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cwa1984 View Post
You are not at all familiar with Pennsylvania are you?
Pennsylvania is traditionally known as a blue state.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Red_states_and_blue_states
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Old 03-19-2012, 07:20 PM
 
Location: South Central Nebraska
350 posts, read 630,358 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by stlouisan View Post
I think that's a pretty accurate statement...if by the southeast you're including Kentucky, Virginia, and West Virginia, all of which are more than enough to be classified as that. In any event, the North is not nearly as culturally and demographically united as the south...you can group the southeast in with the south central and even "western south" states (OK and TX) and not have too many difficulties. However, if you try and group in a state like New Jersey with Iowa, you run into major problems.

One of the things I read historically about the Midwest that separated it from the Northeast was the politics..even today you can see it. The Midwest is probably the most politically balanced region in the country, whereas the N/E is fairly uniformly heavily liberal. The Midwest also I believe was much more isolationist than the N/E, or the other way around, can't remember which, just know that was a major distinguishing point. Also, there is absolutely no similarity between a Chicago accent and a New York accent...the two are almost alien by comparison. Not the case with a Virginia accent vs. say, a Texas one or Mississippi one. Are there noticeable differences? Of course...but the similarities are such that you will immediately classify them all as in the "South," and if not knowledgeable on dialects, you could easily mistake them for each other.
Yes I am including those states. I just wish Southerners would be nicer to us. I am proud to be a Midwesterner and I guess some of my comments about Missouri had been made, never having spent much time there and simply looking at the landscape that I drove through on I-44 that had trees and hills and few fields which felt more "southern" to me than a drive on say I-80 in Iowa. It is undeniable to me that St. Louis and Kansas City are Midwestern cities but what about Springfield and Rolla? Other than going to McDonalds I spent very little time off the interstate. I guess I am afraid that south of I-70 in Missouri there would be the same hostility as in Arkansas and that the latitude is the same as borderline southern states or states with southern elements to them further to the east. As crazy as this sounds I feel like if I go too deep into Kansas I am afraid I may encounter some of these elements as well! If I go South I like going to New Mexico and Arizona because its an entirely different region altogether and one not marred by the hostility of the past!
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Old 03-19-2012, 08:23 PM
 
Location: Pennsylvania
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Quote:
Originally Posted by gwillyfromphilly View Post
Pennsylvania is traditionally known as a blue state.

Red states and blue states - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
You might want to check your link again since it shows at the bottom PA being red and when it was blue was only counting Presidential elections.



Not to mention we have 8 year republican governor rule then 8 years democratic governor rule with the cycle repeating itself. We had two republican senators from 2000-2006 and now we have a democrat and a republican senator. Our state legislature is completely controlled by the republicans. Or the fact Pennsylvania could very well vote republican in this Presidential election.

Sorry man but were a moderate state that bounces back and forth.
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Old 03-19-2012, 08:43 PM
 
Location: Somewhere below Mason/Dixon
6,523 posts, read 7,463,600 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by gwillyfromphilly View Post
Pennsylvania is traditionally known as a blue state.

Red states and blue states - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Pa is not as uniformley liberal as the rest of the northeast. Pa is more socially conservative than its neighbors, but its very blue on issues concerning unions. Really how blue can it really be, Rick Santorum is from there. The politics of Pa almost fit better with the states hundreds of miles to the west. Wisconsin, Michigan, Indiana and Ohio have similar swing state politics to Pa. Pennsylvania is the most un-northeastern northeast state politically. Dont take this post wrong, I am not claiming Pa is really more like a midwest state, as it is clearly in the northeast. Im just saying politically its not the same as its neighbors.
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Old 03-19-2012, 08:57 PM
 
Location: Vineland, NJ
8,483 posts, read 10,467,331 times
Reputation: 5401
Quote:
Originally Posted by cwa1984 View Post
You might want to check your link again since it shows at the bottom PA being red and when it was blue was only counting Presidential elections.



Not to mention we have 8 year republican governor rule then 8 years democratic governor rule with the cycle repeating itself. We had two republican senators from 2000-2006 and now we have a democrat and a republican senator. Our state legislature is completely controlled by the republicans. Or the fact Pennsylvania could very well vote republican in this Presidential election.

Sorry man but were a moderate state that bounces back and forth.
It still doesn't change the fact that PA traditionally leans more toward the blue states than the red states based on past presidential and governor elections. End of story.
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Old 03-19-2012, 09:00 PM
 
Location: Pennsylvania
1,392 posts, read 1,276,102 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by gwillyfromphilly View Post
It still doesn't change the fact that PA traditionally leans more toward the blue states than the red states based on past presidential and governor elections. End of story.
No...just no. You need to look at the entire voting for state and federal government before determining if a state is blue, red, or moderate. If you look at PA as a whole it is definitely a moderate state if not the model moderate state.
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Old 03-19-2012, 09:05 PM
 
Location: Somewhere below Mason/Dixon
6,523 posts, read 7,463,600 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NCN View Post
Yes, I thought the Civil War was States Rights also. Fancy that! There is a book called the Black Swan by (I think) Day Taylor that gives a fictional look at the real Southerner's version of what the Civil War was all about. It is good reading too. I must warn that it is so hot it will burn your fingers off.

Aren't most people in Michigan Southern transplants. Someone on City-Data mentioned one day that they had been very welcoming to all the Southerners that came North when they were looking for jobs.

I have been trying for some time to get reservations with our timeshare in a couple of the states you mentioned. They're always booked up. The season for travel there is so small that you almost need to start two years ahead of time. We are hoping to go to the Black Hills or Yellowstone this year and we will be traveling through some of your Midwestern States. And I do know the difference between New York, N.J. and Pennsylvania and New England and the Midwest. I have friends from all those states and more too, but I cannot help noticing the differences. Some people adjust faster than others. I call it the six month test. In six months after moving here, one has either adjusted or they probably never will or may spend many more years trying. Some just move back to where they came from.

We live in an area that is so confusing that a person can hide if they want to, so we end up with a lot of retired police officers, retired FBI agents, and other people who are looking for safety. One little policeman's wife came in one day and told me about a neighbor stopping by when she was in her yard and talking to her and she could not understand what he was saying. Here comes another of my laughable moments. She had a very New York accent and I thought but did not say, "I bet he had a hard time understanding you too." It is just funny to me that Northerners think we are the one's with the accent when they have more of an accent than we do. As a public worker, I encountered many accents. And I hope I didn't give you the impression that I don't like people from the other parts of the country. I have come to study accents and usually can pick out where a person has spent a lot of their time. The way a person from the Ohio Valley says "doll" is a dead giveaway.

Just call me Julia Sugarbaker on Designing Women. I enjoy putting people in their place when they start "putting down" Southern ways. We all need to have a little fun sometimes, don't we?
Yes there is a large population of people in Michigan who are decended from southerners. This large migration happened in the 20s, 30s, 40s, and 50s, so those people are either gone now or at a very advanced age. Many of us are the children and grandchildren of these people. However the impact of southern culture is still visable in certain areas near metro Detroit, or anywhere there is a long history of auto plants. Michigan used to be a boom state, and for decades it was the place to be, just like the Carolinas, Georgia, Texas and Arizona are today. I read once that Michigan had the most members of the Sons of the Confederacy of any state north of mason dixon. Its funny how things have reversed, now because of our economic situation people have started moving back south in the same large numbers. Its almost like history un-doing itself. From what I hear people from Michigan adjust pretty well when they move south, I dont think they face the same culture shock that a New Yorker would. Heck most people I have ever seen move here from New York or somewhere out there turn tail and go back east because of culture shock. I think the northeast has a very unique culture and its hardest for people raised in that culture to adapt to other areas.
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