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Old 03-21-2012, 04:21 PM
 
Location: Jefferson City 4 days a week, St. Louis 3 days a week
2,709 posts, read 4,233,455 times
Reputation: 998

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https://tastyresearch.files.wordpres...pvssodamap.png

Anybody who says soda is a common southern term needs a reality check, and a big one. Soda is far more common in the Midwest and Northeast than in the south. As indicated by the map, soda essentially blankets most of the northeast, and it has significant portions of the Midwest that it blankets as well (large parts of Missouri, Illinois, and Wisconsin). Virginia and North Carolina do use soda, but they use a swath of other terms as well. Other than these two states and Florida, soda is almost entirely absent on this map where the south is concerned.
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Old 03-21-2012, 04:23 PM
 
Location: Silver Springs, FL
23,440 posts, read 31,756,105 times
Reputation: 15560
Quote:
Originally Posted by GunnerTHB View Post
Hmmm I've never heard pop down there. It drives me crazy too lol.
Could be a micro-regional thing...all the cousins from Butler county say it.
You know, like the hoosier thing in STL.
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Old 03-21-2012, 04:32 PM
 
3,644 posts, read 9,012,935 times
Reputation: 1798
Quote:
Originally Posted by stlouisan View Post
https://tastyresearch.files.wordpres...pvssodamap.png

Anybody who says soda is a common southern term needs a reality check, and a big one. Soda is far more common in the Midwest and Northeast than in the south. As indicated by the map, soda essentially blankets most of the northeast, and it has significant portions of the Midwest that it blankets as well (large parts of Missouri, Illinois, and Wisconsin). Virginia and North Carolina do use soda, but they use a swath of other terms as well. Other than these two states and Florida, soda is almost entirely absent on this map where the south is concerned.
How are you gonna tell me that I need a reality check when I live in the South? It is my reality... Yes, "coke" is the first term that people use. It's the colloquial term, but when people want to sound a little more "proper" they say "soda" So "soda" is what the local media uses and it's what people say when they want to clarify themselves because "coke" is not so clear. For instance, the other day, my friend said "I'm giving up cokes for lent" and another friend asks "Like, just Coca-Colas?" my friend responded "No, sodas in general" Had my friend said "pops" instead of "sodas" we would have all had a good laugh because nobody says that hear. It would be a dead give-away that you're not from around here. On the other hand, "soda" is perceived as more of "that person is trying to sound educated"

The map only shows the first most common term, but it doesn't show the second most common term. Where I live, "coke" is first, followed by "soda", and "pop" is virtually non-existent. I grew up saying "soda" and no one ever corrected me or asked me what the hell I was saying, so it must not be that uncommon.

It seems to me that anything that they do or say up in St. Louis needs to distanced from whatever they do or say in the South. So if a poster mentions that some Southerners say "soda" then you automatically get defensive because they say "soda" in St. Louis. God forbid that anything they say in St. Louis is also said in the South.

Last edited by Smtchll; 03-21-2012 at 04:56 PM..
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Old 03-21-2012, 04:34 PM
 
Location: USA
2,779 posts, read 6,693,692 times
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Cajun accents are not delta accents. North of Pointe Coupee parish in Louisiana there's no French influence in the delta.
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Old 03-21-2012, 04:37 PM
 
Location: West Tennessee
2,082 posts, read 2,904,002 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hdwell View Post
Cajun accents are not delta accents. North of Pointe Coupee parish in Louisiana there's no French influence in the delta.
Absolutely correct.
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Old 03-21-2012, 04:55 PM
 
Location: Jefferson City 4 days a week, St. Louis 3 days a week
2,709 posts, read 4,233,455 times
Reputation: 998
Quote:
Originally Posted by Stars&StripesForever View Post
They sound southern to me. To my southern ears, I hear people who sound less southern than that every day.
How else do I respond to this except that you have no idea what you are talking about...you think the Sainte genevieve accent sounds southern? No southerner with an accent other than general american that I've ever met can hide their accent that well unless they move to another region of the country, and those people have been in St. G forever. And the Poplar Bluff accent is definitely southern, but to call it a Deep South accent is stretching it....people from Poplar Bluff speak very similar to Kentucky, Tennessee, and Arkansas.
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Old 03-21-2012, 04:59 PM
 
29,949 posts, read 27,441,480 times
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I was born and raised in SC and we always referred to soft drinks as "soda." Never heard of it being generally referred to as "coke" or "pop" in my neck of the woods until encountering online discussions like these.
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Old 03-21-2012, 05:02 PM
 
3,644 posts, read 9,012,935 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mutiny77 View Post
I was born and raised in SC and we always referred to soft drinks as "soda." Never heard of it being generally referred to as "coke" or "pop" in my neck of the woods until encountering online discussions like these.
Same here, I didnt know that we Southerners were "supposed" to be saying "coke" until I got on city-data, but ever since then, I've noticed it more.
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Old 03-21-2012, 05:02 PM
 
29,949 posts, read 27,441,480 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kshe95girl View Post
I am from SE MO, there really isnt much of a southern accent until you get south of US 60.
These people (the farmers) are from my hometown of Sainte Genevieve, MO, no southern accent at all.

Environmental Stewardship - Eckenfels Farm - 2009 Region III Award Winner - YouTube
I hear a bit of a Southern twang in the son's voice but not the parents' voices. Interesting.
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Old 03-21-2012, 05:03 PM
 
29,949 posts, read 27,441,480 times
Reputation: 18540
Quote:
Originally Posted by Smtchll View Post
Same here, I didnt know that we Southerners were "supposed" to be saying "coke" until I got on city-data, but ever since then, I've noticed it more.
I still haven't noticed it. I do know that a lot of Northerners say "pop" though; I've experienced that in real life.
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