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Old 03-21-2012, 05:14 PM
 
2,402 posts, read 3,581,842 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by stlouisan View Post
How else do I respond to this except that you have no idea what you are talking about...you think the Sainte genevieve accent sounds southern? No southerner with an accent other than general american that I've ever met can hide their accent that well unless they move to another region of the country, and those people have been in St. G forever. And the Poplar Bluff accent is definitely southern, but to call it a Deep South accent is stretching it....people from Poplar Bluff speak very similar to Kentucky, Tennessee, and Arkansas.
I must be one of them, because few people comment on my southern accent when I'm outside of the South. I was born and raised in the South. I have lived in the South my entire life. I live around and work with southerners who sound no more southern than the "St. G" accent. On the other hand, there are others who have deeper, thicker accents. It really depends on the person and in the area.

The "Deep South" accent I was referring to was the first video someone posted of a lone man talking, not the one of the family in Poplar Bluff, or the one of the people in the flood waters.

The one from Dexter Missouri sounds very Birmingham, Alabama ish.
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Old 03-21-2012, 05:16 PM
 
2,402 posts, read 3,581,842 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mutiny77 View Post
I hear a bit of a Southern twang in the son's voice but not the parents' voices. Interesting.
The son does sound southern. The dad sounds a little southern. The mom does not sound southern at all.
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Old 03-21-2012, 05:17 PM
 
Location: Silver Springs, FL
23,440 posts, read 31,748,384 times
Reputation: 15560
Quote:
Originally Posted by Stars&StripesForever View Post
I must be one of them, because few people comment on my southern accent when I'm outside of the South. I was born and raised in the South. I have lived in the South my entire life. I live around and work with southerners who sound no more southern than the "St. G" accent. On the other hand, there are others who have deeper, thicker accents. It really depends on the person and in the area.

The "Deep South" accent I was referring to was the first video someone posted of a lone man talking, not the one of the family in Poplar Bluff, or the one of the people in the flood waters.

The one from Dexter Missouri sounds very Birmingham, Alabama ish.
The vid of the family talking and the people in the flood were 2 different ones.
Its easy to get confused after awhile.
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Old 03-21-2012, 05:23 PM
 
Location: Jefferson City 4 days a week, St. Louis 3 days a week
2,709 posts, read 4,232,269 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Smtchll View Post
How are you gonna tell me that I need a reality check when I live in the South? It is my reality... Yes, "coke" is the first term that people use. It's the colloquial term, but when people want to sound a little more "proper" they say "soda" So "soda" is what the local media uses and it's what people say when they want to clarify themselves because "coke" is not so clear. For instance, the other day, my friend said "I'm giving up cokes for lent" and another friend asks "Like, just Coca-Colas?" my friend responded "No, sodas in general" Had my friend said "pops" instead of "sodas" we would have all had a good laugh because nobody says that hear. It would be a dead give-away that you're not from around here. On the other hand, "soda" is perceived as more of "that person is trying to sound educated"

The map only shows the first most common term, but it doesn't show the second most common term. Where I live, "coke" is first, followed by "soda", and "pop" is virtually non-existent. I grew up saying "soda" and no one ever corrected me or asked me what the hell I was saying, so it must not be that uncommon.

It seems to me that anything that they do or say up in St. Louis needs to distanced from whatever they do or say in the South. So if a poster mentions that some Southerners say "soda" then you automatically get defensive because they say "soda" in St. Louis. God forbid that anything they say in St. Louis is also said in the South.
It seems to me that anything they do or say down in Memphis needs to be brought closer to St. Louis

I will admit I was ticked off when I made the post, but it's nonetheless nonsensical to claim that you can identify a southerner if they say "soda."

And it shows soda to be least common in the south of all regions, regardless of how common it may be.
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Old 03-21-2012, 05:26 PM
 
Location: Silver Springs, FL
23,440 posts, read 31,748,384 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Stars&StripesForever View Post
The son does sound southern. The dad sounds a little southern. The mom does not sound southern at all.
All born and raised in the same town.
As were their parents, grandparents, and great-grandparents.
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Old 03-21-2012, 05:29 PM
 
3,644 posts, read 9,010,378 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by stlouisan View Post
It seems to me that anything they do or say down in Memphis needs to be brought closer to St. Louis

I will admit I was ticked off when I made the post, but it's nonetheless nonsensical to claim that you can identify a southerner if they say "soda."

And it shows soda to be least common in the south of all regions, regardless of how common it may be.
I've been saying "soda" long before I knew St. Louis even existed. But I do love St. Louis, so to me, it's a plus whenever I see/hear something here that reminds me of St. Louis, but I dont make things up that dont exist.

And I never claimed that you can identify a Southerner by "soda" I simply said "Everyone here either calls it "coke" or "soda"" which is true. I was replying to kshe's post when she said that people whose parents are from down South usually call it "pop" It seemed strange to me, but she was referring to Southern MO.
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Old 03-21-2012, 05:29 PM
 
Location: Jefferson City 4 days a week, St. Louis 3 days a week
2,709 posts, read 4,232,269 times
Reputation: 998
Quote:
Originally Posted by Stars&StripesForever View Post
The son does sound southern. The dad sounds a little southern. The mom does not sound southern at all.
The son and dad have a slight southern influence to their accents, but nobody in their right mind would mistaken either of them to be southerners..why would you claim somebody sounds southern if their accent is much more general american? This is like taking someone is 1/15 Native American, hispanic, pick your race...and claiming that that person is part of that race. It's ridiculous. Both the kid and dad could blend in with a good chunk of Midwesterners. I guess dialect maps have no meaning at all, and the professional linguists waste their time and resources making these maps, because many decide they are good enough on their own to diagnose it.
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Old 03-21-2012, 05:34 PM
 
Location: Jefferson City 4 days a week, St. Louis 3 days a week
2,709 posts, read 4,232,269 times
Reputation: 998
Quote:
Originally Posted by Stars&StripesForever View Post
I must be one of them, because few people comment on my southern accent when I'm outside of the South. I was born and raised in the South. I have lived in the South my entire life. I live around and work with southerners who sound no more southern than the "St. G" accent. On the other hand, there are others who have deeper, thicker accents. It really depends on the person and in the area.

The "Deep South" accent I was referring to was the first video someone posted of a lone man talking, not the one of the family in Poplar Bluff, or the one of the people in the flood waters.

The one from Dexter Missouri sounds very Birmingham, Alabama ish.
Fine, you're entitled to your opinion, but know that I am speaking not just based on my experiences alone, but from the opinions many around me have provided as well as studies done by professional linguists. Saying your personal experiences alone trump those is just downright arrogant.

Last edited by stlouisan; 03-21-2012 at 05:44 PM..
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Old 03-21-2012, 05:40 PM
 
3,644 posts, read 9,010,378 times
Reputation: 1798
Quote:
Originally Posted by stlouisan View Post
Where exactly do you live anyway? That's what I want to know. Also, why don't professonal linguists share your opinion if you are so on the money? How many more maps do I need to show that backs this up...google southern dialect and you'll get countless maps like the one I provided. What's next? Somebody without a doctoral degree should be allowed to operate on people?
The dialect maps shows that Ste Genevieve is in a similar position as Northern OK, towards the bottom of the Midland dialect, not far from the Southern dialect. Half my family is from Northern OK and they definitely have a Southern accent, more Southern than mine, but on the maps, they're in the Midland area. So it's not out of the question that some places in Missouri that fall into the Midland areas on the map might have some people that sound Southern. That being said, I dont think the guy in the video sounds very Southern, every now and then, yes. But the guy in the Hannibal video sounds more Southern than the Ste Genevieve guy.
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Old 03-21-2012, 05:46 PM
 
Location: Jefferson City 4 days a week, St. Louis 3 days a week
2,709 posts, read 4,232,269 times
Reputation: 998
Quote:
Originally Posted by Smtchll View Post
I've been saying "soda" long before I knew St. Louis even existed. But I do love St. Louis, so to me, it's a plus whenever I see/hear something here that reminds me of St. Louis, but I dont make things up that dont exist.

And I never claimed that you can identify a Southerner by "soda" I simply said "Everyone here either calls it "coke" or "soda"" which is true. I was replying to kshe's post when she said that people whose parents are from down South usually call it "pop" It seemed strange to me, but she was referring to Southern MO.
Right...so the map I provided, plus the lingustics map, proves that I make things up that don't exist. Thanks for you insight, I'll try to be less accurate from now on.
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