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Old 04-06-2013, 08:11 AM
 
Location: USA
2,779 posts, read 6,683,825 times
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The cities of Lousiiana besides New Orleans have Italian communities many who are farmers just outside the city limits. Most of them are truck farmers or farm cotton. I wish we had some good roadside vegetable stands again that were owned by the Italians. The older generations are gone or retired and the younger ones aren't in the business or have left here. Sigh, another thing gone
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Old 04-06-2013, 09:01 AM
 
5,265 posts, read 14,899,381 times
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What a lot of people don't realize is that a very significant portion of Italian Americans did not simply hop off the boat on Ellis Island and then stay put in the NE at first; that is just where they settled. Western expansion was at it's fiercest during the period of time Italians were migrating to the US in largest numbers (1890s-1920s) and a lot of the "bottom of the barrel" job opportunities were out west in the mines/railroads. My off-the-boat Italian great-grandfather started out in Pueblo, Colorado in 1910 working the mines his first two years in the US before earning enough to buy a grocery store and settling in Rochester, NY (a very heavily Italian city/metro). The small "out of place" Italian populations one might find out west are likely the few remnants of those who did not move back east to the cities once they'd made enough money to settle down.
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Old 04-06-2013, 07:41 PM
Status: "Summer!" (set 15 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
86,987 posts, read 102,540,351 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sheena12 View Post
Henry Fonda was also not Italian.

However, Winona Judd, Ashley Judd and Rosanne Cash ( Johnny Cash's eldest daughter) are.

All names ending in "O" are not Italian. Many French names were changed. Some Norwegian names end in "O" also.

Other names, notably those ending in vowels "I" and "A" are Eastern European.
Brando wasn't, that was my error, but Henry Fonda was part Italian.
Henry Fonda - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
**The Fonda surname originated with immigrants from Genoa, Italy, to the Netherlands, in the 15th century. In 1642, a branch of the Fonda family immigrated to the Dutch colony of New Netherland, on the East Coast of North America.
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Old 04-07-2013, 11:05 AM
 
Location: Dallas, Texas
2,970 posts, read 4,341,163 times
Reputation: 2008
There's a "Jersey Shore" tv show type guy in my department at work and he sticks out like a sore thumb lol.
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Old 02-16-2014, 04:15 PM
 
1,640 posts, read 2,046,833 times
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As Italian-American who's lived in South Florida, Southern California, and now Central Arizona among other places, I can assure you that there are tons of Italian-Americans living in the major metro areas of those states. There are also tons of Italian-Americans in Vegas, too.

I would argue that approximately 15-20% of transplants to Florida, Arizona, and Nevada (three of the fastest growing Sun Belt states for decades over) from other U.S. states are of full or partial Italian descent. Of course, many transplants to the Sun Belt region originated in the Northeast, Upper Midwest, or California--three regions with high concentrations of Italian-Americans.

Generally speaking, Italian-Americans don't like cold weather, which is probably why you don't meet nearly as many in Colorado, Tennessee, Texas, et al.--states that are also very popular among transplants, but are not quite as warm in the winter as Florida or Arizona. FWIW, I've lived in Dallas and Atlanta--two popular destinations among transplants--and met very few Italian-Americans in those cities/metro areas.

Even though there are many Northeastern and, to a lesser extent, Upper Midwestern transplants in Atlanta, Charlotte, and Raleigh, I found that those metro areas tend to attract far fewer Italian-Americans than, say, South Florida (lots of NYC-area Italians) or Tampa Bay (lots of Chicago/Cleveland/Detroit Italians).

Irish, British, and Polish-Americans--those who have a naturally lower tolerance for UV radiation--tend to wind up in Atlanta or Charlotte more often than Florida. I know lots of Irish and British-Americans from New England--where I grew up--who would retire to New Hampshire. My Italian-American father who hates cold weather and loves Florida, mind you, is always floored every time he learns of someone retiring and moving to New Hampshire! With regard to the Sun Belt, I know way more Irish-Americans in North Carolina and way more Italian-Americans in Florida.

Overall, Italian-Americans prefer warmer weather more so than most Americans, IMO. The same goes for Americans of Mediterranean descent, especially Jewish people.
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Old 02-17-2014, 02:45 PM
 
363 posts, read 617,103 times
Reputation: 281
Quote:
Originally Posted by 601halfdozen0theother View Post
Any MINING area. There is a HUGE Italian population in northern Minnesota - the Iron Range. Italian miners were also in northen Wisconsin and in the Upper Penninsula of Michigan, but I know less about those areas.

The coal mines of south central Iowa also drew Italian immigrants in the early 20th c.

I've also heard that the copper mines of Butte Montana were a destination for Italian immigrants.

It always bugs me when people say that you can't find good Italian food outside of urban areas. Come to Hibbing or Chisholm or Virginia, Minnesota for REAL Italian food!
Add southern Colorado to this. Trinidad CO and a lot of the towns in Colorado have a decent Italian population.
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Old 02-17-2014, 02:55 PM
 
363 posts, read 617,103 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Katiana View Post
I think there are Italian communities in almost every large city. For some reason, Italy contributed a lot to the population of the US.

There is a decent size Italian community in Omaha, Nebraska. Marlon Brando is from there. Henry Fonda was actually born in Grand Island, NE, but grew up and got his acting start in Omaha.

Denver has a large Italian community as well. NW Denver used to be the Italian part of town; now a lot of the old Italian families have moved to the suburbs, especially the western suburbs. My little community of Louisville, CO has an Italian community. We are an old mining town, but Omaha and Denver are not.
Neither Fonda or Brando were Italian. But Omaha does have an Italian population that is spread out across the city. It used to be south of downtown by the Burlington and UP depots and they have a Santa Lucia procession from one of the churches down there to the riverfront where the festival is now. There are some okay Italian restaurants in Omaha though and they do run some of the good steakhouses as well (Venice Inn, Mister C's, Piccolo's, Gorat's, and Anthony's are all Italian run or at least were ).
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Old 02-19-2014, 01:14 PM
Status: "Summer!" (set 15 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
86,987 posts, read 102,540,351 times
Reputation: 33050
Quote:
Originally Posted by greenbay33 View Post
Neither Fonda or Brando were Italian. But Omaha does have an Italian population that is spread out across the city. It used to be south of downtown by the Burlington and UP depots and they have a Santa Lucia procession from one of the churches down there to the riverfront where the festival is now. There are some okay Italian restaurants in Omaha though and they do run some of the good steakhouses as well (Venice Inn, Mister C's, Piccolo's, Gorat's, and Anthony's are all Italian run or at least were ).
I'm now aware that Brando wasn't Italian, but Fonda was of Italian ancestry, though pretty far back.
Henry Fonda - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
**The Fonda surname originated with immigrants from Genoa, Italy, to the Netherlands, in the 15th century. In 1642, a branch of the Fonda family immigrated to the Dutch colony of New Netherland, on the East Coast of North America.[3] They were among the first Dutch population to settle in what is now upstate New York, establishing the town of Fonda, New York. By 1888, many of their descendants had relocated to Nebraska.[4]**
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Old 02-19-2014, 08:37 PM
 
Location: south central
606 posts, read 952,141 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 601halfdozen0theother View Post
Any MINING area. There is a HUGE Italian population in northern Minnesota - the Iron Range. Italian miners were also in northen Wisconsin and in the Upper Penninsula of Michigan, but I know less about those areas.

The coal mines of south central Iowa also drew Italian immigrants in the early 20th c.

I've also heard that the copper mines of Butte Montana were a destination for Italian immigrants.

It always bugs me when people say that you can't find good Italian food outside of urban areas. Come to Hibbing or Chisholm or Virginia, Minnesota for REAL Italian food!
Montana has some areas of Italian concentration. Mario Battali is from Montana.
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Old 02-20-2014, 12:11 PM
 
9,028 posts, read 16,421,659 times
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Colorado had a large amount of Italians living there.

When the gold rush hit and they traced gold and other minerals into the mountains it brought in a lot of people to work the mines - many of which were Italian

The first Italian ancestor I have on US soil came through San Francisco from Genoa. He then migrated to Denver where he worked mainly in support of the Italian community - a lot of the time operating an Italian language printing press.

Through the late 1800s and early 1900s Colorado had a very active Italian community - it was the first state to pass Columbus Day as a holiday
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