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Old 04-05-2012, 04:18 PM
 
Location: IN
20,861 posts, read 35,992,597 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cBach View Post
I have the opposite problem to you. I wouldn't live anywhere in the northern tier due to the sun angle and the cold alone. I am prone to getting SAD (seasonal affective disorder) without good strong doses of sunlight, I also am susceptible of getting eczema and asthma in cold dry weather. I tend to get skin problems within a couple of hours of being in a cold dry climate. Therefore, I stay well to the south of the 35 parallel, sticking close to the 30N parallel during winter time or south of it. Climate and weather a quality of life issue for me as well.
NH does not have a cold dry climate. RH values are moderate and precipitation is common during winter. Yes, some people have issues with SAD, but that is often a result of vitamin D deficiency- which most people don't get enough of anyway. Snow cover and winter sun also brighten most days in a "typical season" so its much better than the mid latitudes where everything stays brown and ugly for months. The tradeoff for shorter winter days and the low sun angle is milder temperatures for the rest of the year, though. Didn't Austin have temperatures of 110-120F for months last year? No thanks
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Old 04-05-2012, 07:46 PM
 
Location: South Central Nebraska
350 posts, read 630,883 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GraniteStater View Post
NH does not have a cold dry climate. RH values are moderate and precipitation is common during winter. Yes, some people have issues with SAD, but that is often a result of vitamin D deficiency- which most people don't get enough of anyway. Snow cover and winter sun also brighten most days in a "typical season" so its much better than the mid latitudes where everything stays brown and ugly for months. The tradeoff for shorter winter days and the low sun angle is milder temperatures for the rest of the year, though. Didn't Austin have temperatures of 110-120F for months last year? No thanks
Why do you like lots of snow? It's pretty but it gets tiring to shovel and snowblow. I agree its imperative for good skiing, sledding etc that's why I go visit places with snow when I go skiing!
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Old 04-05-2012, 08:05 PM
 
Location: Austin, TX
10,827 posts, read 9,450,839 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GraniteStater View Post
NH does not have a cold dry climate. RH values are moderate and precipitation is common during winter. Yes, some people have issues with SAD, but that is often a result of vitamin D deficiency- which most people don't get enough of anyway. Snow cover and winter sun also brighten most days in a "typical season" so its much better than the mid latitudes where everything stays brown and ugly for months. The tradeoff for shorter winter days and the low sun angle is milder temperatures for the rest of the year, though. Didn't Austin have temperatures of 110-120F for months last year? No thanks
We were extremely green this winter due to heavy rains. Louisiana was always that way growing up too. It's nice being able to fish, hike, or golf in the middle of the winter. In Austin, we had a drought last year but it started to break in October with a little rain and then by December we had a few weeks of cool (well mild by your standards) rainy weather to green everything up, make the waterfalls flow again, etc... January through March were rainy as well, but April has begun dry. Things were starting to bloom in late February this year and March and April have been very green and bright with pretty cobalt blue skies and warm sunshine. One thing up north is that it can be white in the winter, but spring comes late and fall comes early, and the time right after the leaves are gone but before the snow arrives (November) things look very drab and dull, especially since many trees are deciduous in many locations, losing their leaves, with only brown trees viewable and leaves covering what little grass does remain. I remember being in MA once in November, it was cold, the leaves were just blowing around, and everything just looked dead. Then I was back to Austin and trees that still hadn't lost their leaves. I was so happy to return. The same thing in the spring. The snow melts and you get mud season, when you can't do much of anything, all the trails are muddy, the trees haven't started blooming, and the weather is still crappy. No thanks.

I like to hike and get out and my skin tone changes from pasty in the winter to very tan in the summer. It's like all the Vitamin D I receive just awakens my body.

Dew points in NH can regularly get into the teens or lower. For me, any dewpoint below 50 starts to affect my skin. It's even more pronounced in the winter because heating elements further dry out the atmosphere. Whole house humidifiers somewhat alleviate that, but hotels don't have that so that eliminates me being able to visit up there for anything other than business, and I sure wouldn't ever live up there again.

We had 110+ for maybe 2 days last year, a record hot summer for us. How many days were you below zero in NH in winter 2010 - 2011 (I'll use a cold winter for you since you used a record summer for us)? I can't breathe in those conditions. No thanks.

My dad has a saying and it begins to become truer and truer each year. He is living in Southern Louisiana and he says "There ain't nothing good north of I-10." Now, I think there has to be an exception for Austin, but that adage starts to make more and more sense each year. By the way, he has traveled the world, as I have so it's not ignorance.

Last edited by cBach; 04-05-2012 at 08:18 PM..
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Old 04-05-2012, 08:29 PM
 
Location: Somewhere in Texas
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I don't know but when I find it, I'm moving. I've searched the map and just can't find that perfect spot, not yet anyway.
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Old 04-05-2012, 08:42 PM
 
Location: IN
20,861 posts, read 35,992,597 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SCentralNEGuy View Post
Why do you like lots of snow? It's pretty but it gets tiring to shovel and snowblow. I agree its imperative for good skiing, sledding etc that's why I go visit places with snow when I go skiing!
I plan for snow during winter so it is built in my routine unless it is an extreme snow event over a foot and a half. Snowblowing is easy. Roads are always well maintained and I have a Subaru with a winter kit as well as a bucket of sand.
To me, winter snowcover IS very important because it adds a LOT of brightness close to the ground and gives one a feeling of energy. Up north, this is important because the solar declination angle of the sun is much lower in the sky during the core winter season. I feel lethargic when I have to look out and see brown drabness with little snowcover for months at a time.
The tradeoff for those that don't care for snow where I live is milder temperatures for the reamaining three seasons. The average high temperature in July is 79-80F. The average for October is 55-65F. The average for April is 50-60F. Great for those that don't like high temperatures.
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Old 04-05-2012, 08:55 PM
 
Location: IN
20,861 posts, read 35,992,597 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cBach View Post
We were extremely green this winter due to heavy rains. Louisiana was always that way growing up too. It's nice being able to fish, hike, or golf in the middle of the winter. In Austin, we had a drought last year but it started to break in October with a little rain and then by December we had a few weeks of cool (well mild by your standards) rainy weather to green everything up, make the waterfalls flow again, etc... January through March were rainy as well, but April has begun dry. Things were starting to bloom in late February this year and March and April have been very green and bright with pretty cobalt blue skies and warm sunshine. One thing up north is that it can be white in the winter, but spring comes late and fall comes early, and the time right after the leaves are gone but before the snow arrives (November) things look very drab and dull, especially since many trees are deciduous in many locations, losing their leaves, with only brown trees viewable and leaves covering what little grass does remain. I remember being in MA once in November, it was cold, the leaves were just blowing around, and everything just looked dead. Then I was back to Austin and trees that still hadn't lost their leaves. I was so happy to return. The same thing in the spring. The snow melts and you get mud season, when you can't do much of anything, all the trails are muddy, the trees haven't started blooming, and the weather is still crappy. No thanks.

I like to hike and get out and my skin tone changes from pasty in the winter to very tan in the summer. It's like all the Vitamin D I receive just awakens my body.

Dew points in NH can regularly get into the teens or lower. For me, any dewpoint below 50 starts to affect my skin. It's even more pronounced in the winter because heating elements further dry out the atmosphere. Whole house humidifiers somewhat alleviate that, but hotels don't have that so that eliminates me being able to visit up there for anything other than business, and I sure wouldn't ever live up there again.

We had 110+ for maybe 2 days last year, a record hot summer for us. How many days were you below zero in NH in winter 2010 - 2011 (I'll use a cold winter for you since you used a record summer for us)? I can't breathe in those conditions. No thanks.

My dad has a saying and it begins to become truer and truer each year. He is living in Southern Louisiana and he says "There ain't nothing good north of I-10." Now, I think there has to be an exception for Austin, but that adage starts to make more and more sense each year. By the way, he has traveled the world, as I have so it's not ignorance.
Your point is taken regarding the later Spring and earlier Fall seasons. Decidious treecover is more common in Massachusetts. Where I live it is about 50-75% coniferous trees so you have a good amount of greenery all year long.
In all honesty, I think the dry air combined with the wind was what I had a problem with. I lived in the Kansas City area for a number of years and the winters there were very brown and windy. That combined with forced air natural gas heat in most houses (which lowered indoor RH even with a humidifier) was not good at all.

Even though NH can have lower bouts of humidity during winter the winds tend to be far less and the snowcover generally keeps humidity levels more elevated even though the temperatures are cold. The cold air dosen't bother me, but that is likely due to my northern European roots. I never felt like the climate of the Central Plains was a good match at all as I just can't stand the wind anymore.

"How many days were you below zero in NH in winter 2010 - 2011"

Not many at all compared to the Upper Midwest. According to the nearest reporting station 14 days recorded low temperatures below zero.
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Old 04-11-2012, 09:15 PM
 
Location: Austin, TX
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GraniteStater View Post
Your point is taken regarding the later Spring and earlier Fall seasons. Decidious treecover is more common in Massachusetts. Where I live it is about 50-75% coniferous trees so you have a good amount of greenery all year long.
In all honesty, I think the dry air combined with the wind was what I had a problem with. I lived in the Kansas City area for a number of years and the winters there were very brown and windy. That combined with forced air natural gas heat in most houses (which lowered indoor RH even with a humidifier) was not good at all.

Even though NH can have lower bouts of humidity during winter the winds tend to be far less and the snowcover generally keeps humidity levels more elevated even though the temperatures are cold. The cold air dosen't bother me, but that is likely due to my northern European roots. I never felt like the climate of the Central Plains was a good match at all as I just can't stand the wind anymore.

"How many days were you below zero in NH in winter 2010 - 2011"

Not many at all compared to the Upper Midwest. According to the nearest reporting station 14 days recorded low temperatures below zero.
You mention RH (relative humidity) but that should never be used. For instance, you can have a dew point of 60 but RH values of 20% in Austin (happens sometimes) whereas you could have a dewpoint of 10 in NH with a RH of 100%. That doesn't make it "humid", it just means if the temp falls any lower precipitation would be forced out of the air.

I think a truer measure of humidity would be the measure of humidity inside the house. It's true that forced air tends to dry the air out more than forced hot water, but forced air has a filter and thus there is no way to filter the indoor air quality with a forced hot water/steam (radiator). I also lived in KC and I had a whole house humidifier. In the winter, I set the humidity to 100%, that was the only way I could get by in those conditions!

In contrast, I lived in PA as well and they have a much snowier/wetter climate than KC and I still had the same skin conditions there with the radiators than the forced hot air of the Plains.

I agree that the winters in KC suck, they are cold and windy and whatever snow falls melts within a week. However, once you get very far south, like into the Deep South, you can have very green winters. Same thing out West. California's "rainy season" is wintertime, that is when all the hills are nice and green and the weather is unbelievably mild. They also get brown in the summer, but that just means no mosquitoes. By the way, how are the mosquitoes in NH? I hear they can be quite bad.

I'd also prefer to live with two 110 degree days than 14 below zero days.
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Old 04-11-2012, 09:35 PM
 
Location: IN
20,861 posts, read 35,992,597 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cBach View Post
You mention RH (relative humidity) but that should never be used. For instance, you can have a dew point of 60 but RH values of 20% in Austin (happens sometimes) whereas you could have a dewpoint of 10 in NH with a RH of 100%. That doesn't make it "humid", it just means if the temp falls any lower precipitation would be forced out of the air.

I think a truer measure of humidity would be the measure of humidity inside the house. It's true that forced air tends to dry the air out more than forced hot water, but forced air has a filter and thus there is no way to filter the indoor air quality with a forced hot water/steam (radiator). I also lived in KC and I had a whole house humidifier. In the winter, I set the humidity to 100%, that was the only way I could get by in those conditions!

In contrast, I lived in PA as well and they have a much snowier/wetter climate than KC and I still had the same skin conditions there with the radiators than the forced hot air of the Plains.

I agree that the winters in KC suck, they are cold and windy and whatever snow falls melts within a week. However, once you get very far south, like into the Deep South, you can have very green winters. Same thing out West. California's "rainy season" is wintertime, that is when all the hills are nice and green and the weather is unbelievably mild. They also get brown in the summer, but that just means no mosquitoes. By the way, how are the mosquitoes in NH? I hear they can be quite bad.

I'd also prefer to live with two 110 degree days than 14 below zero days.
Black flies are more common than mosquitoes, but both can be bad if you live near water... With that being said they aren't out for a long period of time because the climate features three months with frost free conditions. The shorter frost free period also allows for less in the way of allergies as well.

I still prefer colder temperatures over hotter temperatures. My favorite winter temperatures are in the 20-30F range with light winds, clear sky, and deep snowcover. Great for being outdoors.
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Old 04-11-2012, 09:47 PM
 
Location: Austin, TX
10,827 posts, read 9,450,839 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GraniteStater View Post
Black flies are more common than mosquitoes, but both can be bad if you live near water... With that being said they aren't out for a long period of time because the climate features three months with frost free conditions. The shorter frost free period also allows for less in the way of allergies as well.

I still prefer colder temperatures over hotter temperatures. My favorite winter temperatures are in the 20-30F range with light winds, clear sky, and deep snowcover. Great for being outdoors.
I think it boils down to personal preference. My ideal summer temps are around 90-95 with moderate winds, dewpoint around 60, and partly cloudy. Great for hiking, swimming, biking, etc...

My favorite winter temps are 60-70 with dewpoints of 60+. Perfect for everything except swimming.
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Old 04-12-2012, 10:26 AM
 
Location: IN
20,861 posts, read 35,992,597 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cBach View Post
I think it boils down to personal preference. My ideal summer temps are around 90-95 with moderate winds, dewpoint around 60, and partly cloudy. Great for hiking, swimming, biking, etc...

My favorite winter temps are 60-70 with dewpoints of 60+. Perfect for everything except swimming.
Yes, mild weather is very nice as well, not disputing that. I just prefer winters with actual snow instead of looking at ugly brown grass all the time.
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