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Old 03-28-2012, 05:15 PM
 
Location: Texas
5,070 posts, read 8,985,791 times
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Please let me know. I'm very interested in such things, especially since I came from a small town.
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Old 03-28-2012, 05:27 PM
 
Location: Victoria TX
42,663 posts, read 74,269,803 times
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What do you mean, "coming back"? Where did they go, and what is there to come back to?

Sadly, most small towns have their city council run by insurance salesmen and car dealers and realtors, and will do everything humanly possible to get their town to "come back" to a point at which they can make more money. People who like living in a small town just get steamrolled under this drive for "growth" and "progress".

I once lived in Oak Grove, Missouri. People in Kansas City got fed up with the big city and moved to Blue Springs, and when that grew too big, they got fed up with that big city and moved to Oak Grove. There was a municipal election there, and every single candidate (the business owners I described above) mentioned the word "growth" in his campaign platform, even though a majority of the voters settled in the town exactly because they hated growth.

One of the glittering jewels of "growth" was a new public library. No longer right down town, it was a mile out the highway, with no way for kids to get there safely except to be driven there in mom's SUV.

Oak Grove was a small-town supernova. In a single generation, it went from a sleepy village to a nice small town to an uncontrollable malignancy.

Last edited by jtur88; 03-28-2012 at 05:42 PM..
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Old 03-28-2012, 05:54 PM
 
Location: plano
6,570 posts, read 8,105,591 times
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I grew up in a town of 10k pop in SE Oklahoma. It never changed during my 20 years growing up there and was static the next 30 years as well. But it never did go down. Now its booming. Manufacturing is moving there from up north due to the good labor pool and low cost of doing business in OK. With the native American tribes doing good with casinos and giving back to their members as well as the community, the town is growing rapidly. Its in an area that is hilly and gets rain so its green. Its about an hour and a half from DT Dallas, and the transportation network of Dallas is a big draw. The local public school is growing and highly ranked for OK schools. With the local college nearby many artistic activites supplement the outdoors activities available near by as well. Unemployment is well under 5 % and call center jobs are coming back from India and others as the labor quality and cost is competitive. Its doubled in size since I grw up there, with much of the growth just outside the town on small acreage property. I consider it a small town success story.
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Old 03-28-2012, 07:06 PM
 
56,621 posts, read 80,930,134 times
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It may depend on your definition of small town. There are some close enough to bigger cities that may work in terms of employment. Perhaps such communities with a college may work for you too.


Here are some in my state that you might like: Village of East Aurora
GREATER EAST AURORA CHAMBER OF COMMERCE

Owego Homepage
Historic Owego Marketplace - Have fun Shopping, Dining and Sightseeing in Owego, NY - Home

Skaneateles Area Chamber Of Commerce - Welcome to Skaneateles

Cazenovia Chamber of Commerce

Clinton, New York: Historic Village of Clinton, NY Shopping & Entertainment Travel Guide

Village of Hamilton - Welcome to Hamilton New York

Cooperstown Chamber of Commerce - Welcome

Carthage Area Chamber of Commerce - Carthage NY 13619 - 315.493.3590

Brockport NY - the Greater Brockport Chamber of Commerce

Village of Fairport

Chamber of Commerce - Lewiston NY, Youngstown NY, Porter, Ransomville, & Sanborn ..::.. Lower Niagara River Region Chamber of Commerce
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Old 03-28-2012, 07:19 PM
 
Location: Texas
5,070 posts, read 8,985,791 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jtur88 View Post
What do you mean, "coming back"? Where did they go, and what is there to come back to?

Sadly, most small towns have their city council run by insurance salesmen and car dealers and realtors, and will do everything humanly possible to get their town to "come back" to a point at which they can make more money. People who like living in a small town just get steamrolled under this drive for "growth" and "progress".

I once lived in Oak Grove, Missouri. People in Kansas City got fed up with the big city and moved to Blue Springs, and when that grew too big, they got fed up with that big city and moved to Oak Grove. There was a municipal election there, and every single candidate (the business owners I described above) mentioned the word "growth" in his campaign platform, even though a majority of the voters settled in the town exactly because they hated growth.

One of the glittering jewels of "growth" was a new public library. No longer right down town, it was a mile out the highway, with no way for kids to get there safely except to be driven there in mom's SUV.

Oak Grove was a small-town supernova. In a single generation, it went from a sleepy village to a nice small town to an uncontrollable malignancy.
I used to be in the town of Paducah, Texas. All the shops around the square are closed, with the exception of a couple of small shops that have opened up. A lot of the agriculture has stopped, though some of the older farmers have done as much farming as they could, renting some of the other farms.

I believe most of the younger ones liked the malls and the movie theaters as well as colleges and jobs. I'd like to see some of these small towns come back but I haven't found a cure. There could be micro-loans available, who knows?
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Old 03-28-2012, 07:25 PM
 
3,970 posts, read 11,833,305 times
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I agree, it depends on your definition of a small town.

Personally, as I get older, I prefer metro areas between 200-300K. Enough population to offer some good restaurants and other amenities, but not so small that everybody knows everybody. These areas usually have few traffic or crime problems, and just make life enjoyable. I'm currently living in such, and if I could choose anywhere to live would probably choose the same. (Perhaps within 3 hours of a major metro).
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Old 03-29-2012, 06:04 AM
 
Location: The canyon (with my pistols and knife)
13,222 posts, read 17,963,194 times
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I think small towns that are located at the intersection of major highways and rail lines will do well in the future.
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Old 03-29-2012, 09:37 AM
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Location: Ohio
16,822 posts, read 33,219,532 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jtur88 View Post
One of the glittering jewels of "growth" was a new public library. No longer right down town, it was a mile out the highway, with no way for kids to get there safely except to be driven there in mom's SUV.
What you describe here is an effect of the modern paradigm, not a cause of it. Suburban kids today don't go to the library by themselves. They don't go anywhere by themselves, unless it's in Mom's SUV. Mom thinks there are predators on every street corner and her kids need to be transported in an armored, suburban assault wagon to keep them from being kidnapped. Do a web search for "helicopter parents."
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Old 03-29-2012, 11:54 AM
 
Location: IN
20,852 posts, read 35,958,846 times
Reputation: 13297
Quote:
Originally Posted by jtur88 View Post
What do you mean, "coming back"? Where did they go, and what is there to come back to?

Sadly, most small towns have their city council run by insurance salesmen and car dealers and realtors, and will do everything humanly possible to get their town to "come back" to a point at which they can make more money. People who like living in a small town just get steamrolled under this drive for "growth" and "progress".

I once lived in Oak Grove, Missouri. People in Kansas City got fed up with the big city and moved to Blue Springs, and when that grew too big, they got fed up with that big city and moved to Oak Grove. There was a municipal election there, and every single candidate (the business owners I described above) mentioned the word "growth" in his campaign platform, even though a majority of the voters settled in the town exactly because they hated growth.

One of the glittering jewels of "growth" was a new public library. No longer right down town, it was a mile out the highway, with no way for kids to get there safely except to be driven there in mom's SUV.

Oak Grove was a small-town supernova. In a single generation, it went from a sleepy village to a nice small town to an uncontrollable malignancy.
Ya, that's Kansas City suburban sprawl development for you. The sheep move in herds and destroy small towns with new housing developments. Kansas City doesn't conserve much land for conservation purposes so you just have haphazard poorly built sprawl housing in all directions. Quantity over quality.
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Old 03-29-2012, 11:58 AM
 
Location: Illinois
565 posts, read 821,965 times
Reputation: 439
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gnutella View Post
I think small towns that are located at the intersection of major highways and rail lines will do well in the future.
My hometown is located on both and is doing very poorly but not because of the rail and roads. It is the lack of foresight by our local administration. They basically want to stagnate the place into a retirement community and limit any meaningful growth. They turn down good proposals ALL of the time and are quickly driving out the meager student population. It's very frustrating because we HAVE the resources in place. Plus the state isn't helping, we lost out on the big for Caterpillar's new factory because the state is very business unfriendly. I wish things would change, they could save my hometown from collapse but they aren't.

Ok sorry, rant over!
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